how different is a '77 2F than a '86 2F

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i found a '86 60series with a hole in the oil pan.
"it ran till it stopped..." they tell me.
so i figure it has a parted con rod.

here's the question. i have a '77 2F core, will they have compatable con rods and pistons? in a perfect word i would pull a complete piston, rings and rod from the core and install it in the other engine.

i know there are alot of other things that could prevent this, cylinder scoring, damaged crank...

anyway, any input would be appreciated.
thank-you.
 
I'm thinking the domed piston from the 77 might be a problem in exchange for the flat top piston
 
what about using the piston from the 60 on the con rod from the other engine.
i am sure the design must have changed in years.

pipe dreaming...

what year engine will bolt up to the bell housing? manual tranny do know if that matters.
 
what year engine will bolt up to the bell housing?



Any 1958-1987 F/2F engine variants will 'bolt up' to the flywheel housing in the 1986 60 series....
 
Even though an early 2F will bolt up to a FJ60 bellhousing, there are some things that won't, like the power steering pump. If these things are important to you, don't use the early 2F block.
 
Hey Eric, I may know of another FJ60 to scavenge a block off of in Edmonton. Was out looking at a 62 in a boneyard to see what was left of it, thought the others were all diesels, but apparently one is an FJ60 (didn't go digging under the hoods, so not sure if there is an engine or not). Could have another look in a couple days when I know a bit more about their situation.
 
If you do decide to rebuild a motor using the stuff you have you could run the early block and rotating assembly and just use a saginaw power steering pump. But after what I just went through getting parts for my rebuild I would use the later head and flat top pistons without question. Early dome pistons are extremely hard to come by these days.
 

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