HAMsters: "Just got licensed, now what?" (Radios / Skills / Articles) (1 Viewer)

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Success! Thanks @Somebodyelse5 with the help with my settings. My little handheld, from my west facing bedroom window, was able to hear the Net Control meeting tonight on 147.300 pretty darn clear. I didn’t talk at all, but cool proof of concept. Also neat to kinda get a feel what these nets are about, and the way people are checking in and talking . Very excited about this new hobby

5CE7324B-394F-4CF5-A318-2279ED53E198.jpeg
 
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You guys may be too far from the Repeater to receive on your rubber duck antennas. Typically, if you can hear the Repeater, you can transmit to it and open it up to receive your signal and retransmit it at much higher power (*many repeaters are running 100w or more). Plus, look into Repeater Net to see which machines are linked together to get your signal even further.

You may have better luck hitting a repeater closer to your location, and Awhatukee should have a great signal right near the towers on South Mountain,
 
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I was downright shocked when it worked tonight. The Del Web hospital is about 25+ miles NW from me, so surprisingly clear reception for this little rubber duck.
 
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I'm glad that worked! I'm about 35mi and a bit uphill from Del Webb and I can receive and transmit clearly, including my HT at 5w. On the 25w base station and a copper-pipe J-pole antenna I built, it sounds like I'm next door to the Repeater. For the record, I'm not a member of the West Valley Amateur Radio club, but they have some very helpful members there and have internalized the Amateur Radio code of ethics, making them a good group to learn by listening.

Their Net Control schedule is; Daily - 9a Check-in Net, 8p Check-in Net, and usually a Newbie Net on the last Fridays of the month. This last Net is meant for new HAMS to call in and test equipment, talk about technical stuff, or just share experiences, but ALL of their Net controls are open to ANY licensed station operator.

The typical Net Control is run as follows;
1) Repeater ID & Net Controller Announcement to Introduce & Open the Net
2) Call for QST (*quick message) traffic, like brief general announcements from stations
3) Welcome call for Mobile or Short Time check-in. This is to catch mobile stations before they drive out of coverage, or for stations that can't stick around for too long. Usually there's a quick trivia question or discussion topic introduced, like; "What's your favorite thing about HAM radio?"
4) Net Controller will pick up 4-5 guys at a time. To check in, wait for a break, give Callsign and your First Name, only. The Net Controller will wait for 4-5 guys, and then make contact with you, in order.
5) When he gets to you, wait for the Ker-Chunk to stop (*repeater resetting), and then start transmitting! You can talk up to about 5min, and then the Repeater shuts you down. This is to control heat and transmitted signal on the machine. If you hear the machine (*just a different name for a repeater) give Morse Code signals, wait for it - as thats it's station ID. When you're done, end with your Callsign and he may come back to ask you follow-up questions or get clarification. If you hear someone say only "comment", the Net Controller may allow the commentor to jump in and ask you something. Be brief, but it's your turn to talk. Remember that there are potentially lots of people waiting for their turn, too.
6) Trivia is answered at the end of the meeting after all Call-Ins are finished, with sometimes additional discussion about it by whoever wants to share.
7) Repeater is returned to normal operation. At this point, anyone can use it as a signal amplifier for general HAM use.

Clubs pay for Repeater construction, maintenance, and operating costs, so bear in mind if you find you use one regularly - it's a nice gesture to join their club, or contact them about sending them a club donation. You'll find that most Repeaters are run by enthusiasts, and they're just happy to have people using their equipment which makes their labor of love worthwhile.

Contact info for the West Valley Amateur Radio club is N7TWT - Dave at 623-680-5011, and remember that you can probably tap into the Repeater, say "N7-Tango-Whiskey-Tango, this is KJ7(*you)" and he just might come on to chat with you. Get used to using Phonetic Alphabet for the last part of Callsigns to help with correct ID. Dave is the Manager for the club, and I got his card at the VE Test session last weekend from one of the Proctors.

I'll try to join tonight's 8p Net (Fri, May3), and you'll be able to recognize my voice. I'll even mention that some new HAMS may be getting on the air, and leave it to you to join in or just hang out. Dont worry, I wont call you out! We can chat after the meeting, if you're up for it. Take care, and enjoy this foray into the Amateur Radio arts,
 
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Also, a good frequency to test equipment for RECEIVE = 154.190mhz. You won't be able to transmit here as its outside the legal 2m band and only special radios can transmit there, but your 2m HAM radio can receive it. As it's the Phoenix Fire Dept dispatch frequency, so you can hear calls for service and it will verify receive function on your radio and antenna. (*sometimes, you just need to hear anything to know it's hooked up correctly!)
 
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Joined
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Messages
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I'm glad that worked! I'm about 35mi and a bit uphill from Del Webb and I can receive and transmit clearly, including my HT at 5w. On the 25w base station and a copper-pipe J-pole antenna I built, it sounds like I'm next door to the Repeater. For the record, I'm not a member of the West Valley Amateur Radio club, but they have some very helpful members there and have internalized the Amateur Radio code of ethics, making them a good group to learn by listening.

Their Net Control schedule is; Daily - 9a Check-in Net, 8p Check-in Net, and usually a Newbie Net on the last Fridays of the month. This last Net is meant for new HAMS to call in and test equipment, talk about technical stuff, or just share experiences, but ALL of their Net controls are open to ANY licensed station operator.

The typical Net Control is run as follows;
1) Repeater ID & Net Controller Announcement to Introduce & Open the Net
2) Call for QST (*quick message) traffic, like brief general announcements from stations
3) Welcome call for Mobile or Short Time check-in. This is to catch mobile stations before they drive out of coverage, or for stations that can't stick around for too long. Usually there's a quick trivia question or discussion topic introduced, like; "What's your favorite thing about HAM radio?"
4) Net Controller will pick up 4-5 guys at a time. To check in, wait for a break, give Callsign and your First Name, only. The Net Controller will wait for 4-5 guys, and then make contact with you, in order.
5) When he gets to you, wait for the Ker-Chunk to stop (*repeater resetting), and then start transmitting! You can talk up to about 5min, and then the Repeater shuts you down. This is to control heat and transmitted signal on the machine. If you hear the machine (*just a different name for a repeater) give Morse Code signals, wait for it - as thats it's station ID. When you're done, end with your Callsign and he may come back to ask you follow-up questions or get clarification. If you hear someone say only "comment", the Net Controller may allow the commentor to jump in and ask you something. Be brief, but it's your turn to talk. Remember that there are potentially lots of people waiting for their turn, too.
6) Trivia is answered at the end of the meeting after all Call-Ins are finished, with sometimes additional discussion about it by whoever wants to share.
7) Repeater is returned to normal operation. At this point, anyone can use it as a signal amplifier for general HAM use.

Clubs pay for Repeater construction, maintenance, and operating costs, so bear in mind if you find you use one regularly - it's a nice gesture to join their club, or contact them about sending them a club donation. You'll find that most Repeaters are run by enthusiasts, and they're just happy to have people using their equipment which makes their labor of love worthwhile.

Contact info for the West Valley Amateur Radio club is N7TWT - Dave at 623-680-5011, and remember that you can probably tap into the Repeater, say "N7-Tango-Whiskey-Tango, this is KJ7(*you)" and he just might come on to chat with you. Get used to using Phonetic Alphabet for the last part of Callsigns to help with correct ID. Dave is the Manager for the club, and I got his card at the VE Test session last weekend from one of the Proctors.

I'll try to join tonight's 8p Net (Fri, May3), and you'll be able to recognize my voice. I'll even mention that some new HAMS may be getting on the air, and leave it to you to join in or just hang out. Dont worry, I wont call you out! We can chat after the meeting, if you're up for it. Take care, and enjoy this foray into the Amateur Radio arts,
thanks for spelling all out for us. incredibly helpful! Good to know about the code of ethics, i felt like just listening for 30 minutes i was able to pickup on quite a few things too. I'll listen in tonight for a bit see if i hear you.
 
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Also, a good frequency to test equipment for RECEIVE = 154.190mhz. You won't be able to transmit here as its outside the legal 2m band and only special radios can transmit there, but your 2m HAM radio can receive it. As it's the Phoenix Fire Dept dispatch frequency, so you can hear calls for service and it will verify receive function on your radio and antenna. (*sometimes, you just need to hear anything to know it's honked up correctly!)
also cool, clear signal on my Baofeng
 

Somebodyelse5

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Also, a good frequency to test equipment for RECEIVE = 154.190mhz. You won't be able to transmit here as its outside the legal 2m band and only special radios can transmit there, but your 2m HAM radio can receive it. As it's the Phoenix Fire Dept dispatch frequency, so you can hear calls for service and it will verify receive function on your radio and antenna. (*sometimes, you just need to hear anything to know it's hooked up correctly!)
I'll plan on getting in tonight, hoping to get some signal. I am real close to south mountain so I may not be able to hit the Dell repeater but I will give it another try tonight
 

Somebodyelse5

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Here is that repeater on repeater net, I am getting it real clear over in tukee.

If you want to try to talk this evening let me know, I will be around. I believe 446.000 MHz is the national simplex calling frequency if you want to try. or we can meat on that repeater.
 
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Here is that repeater on repeater net, I am getting it real clear over in tukee.

If you want to try to talk this evening let me know, I will be around. I believe 446.000 MHz is the national simplex calling frequency if you want to try. or we can meat on that repeater.
Can’t do tonight but tomorrow night if your free around 6:30-7?
 
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You guys playing around on 70cm? Why not connect on a repeater on 2m, and we can all get on to chat...?
 

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