Buying LC From Out of State! Need Logistics Advice (1 Viewer)

GTV

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Si'ahl
I posted this in the clubhouse section as well, apologies if that's a faux pas.

I'm currently closing a deal for a 100 series. My aunt & uncle live near it so I sent them the money, they will pay the seller and pick it up for me this weekend then hold it at their place until the country is somewhat back to normal. Whenever that is I'll drive it home to Seattle.

I need help with logistics. How would you handle the bill of sale, title, registration, etc?
Many thanks!
 
Joined
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Houston, Texas
You’ll want the original certificate of title. Depending on the state, there may be an assignment box on the original certificate of title that the seller can sign. If the seller signs that, you shouldn’t need a separate bill of sale. You register and title the car in your home state. You can check the DMV website for the state where the seller lives and also your state to see if there’s any special requirements.
 

AlpineAccess

Overlanding is an expensive word for car camping.
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This isa very risky way to buy a vehicle. If you absolutely must get this thing now, I'd make sure you get a PPI, and verify the owner of the vehicle is legit and that the title is free and clear. I've bought cars without seeing them, but I really wouldn't do it again if I were to tell you the truth. Fool me once, but I've been fooled twice even with all of the steps below:

I'd do a certified check only, and have the seller meet your aunt and uncle at the bank to sign it. You can give them a limited POA to sign things like the title and a bill of sale on your behalf (your name would still be on these documents, just their signature). They leave with the vehicle and mail you the title so you can go register it in Washington.

Have the seller send you the following: pictures of the VIN and door jam plate. Also the VIN with their drivers license in the frame.

Take the VIN and get an insurance quote initiated, and when your aunt and uncle call to say they are signing the bill of sale, call and insure the car.

Get the plates from WA state, take the insurance card, and fly out and pick the vehicle up and drive it home.
 

AlpineAccess

Overlanding is an expensive word for car camping.
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I should add, here are things you need to look out for:

Known mechanical issues. People sell cars at distance because its harder to pursue them when something goes wrong. Stop leak agents, transmission slip fix, oil thickeners/additives, cheap repair parts used on critical components to get them to pass inspections. Shops often don't catch these things and you end up paying a significant price for them. They do this stuff because they can just block your number and never deal with you again.

Hidden damage. I bought a Subaru from Texas in 2007, had it shipped to me. Clean title, owner seemed really above board, and he sent me paperwork from a shop in his area where it passed the PPI. It was his friends shop, I got duped. Was a Katrina car with hidden rust everywhere and the wiring harness failed within 6 months of getting it. It was rare, I was rushed. I would have caught it if I'd met the guy and driven/inspected the car in person.

Proof of ownership. Watch out for "jr's". Know a guy that bought a car from a junior, went to register it and it was listed stolen. Turns out the guy's son had a drug problem and sold his dads 4Runner while his dad was out of town. No joke. Just like you're having your aunt and uncle buy the car, make sure they verify the seller has the legal right to sell the vehicle. Having the bank cut them the check is the safest way as the bank verifies their identity.

Unlisted liens. They may not have a loan, but they may have signed the vehicle as collateral on something, or have balances owed on repairs by a shop. It's uncommon, but it happens. You're stuck proving ownership after the car gets booted or repossessed.

No insurance. Your aunt and uncle wreck the car driving it home. Guy was uninsured, and you haven't quoted and activated coverage on the car. I would confirm with your insurance company this structure will work - there is enough gray area it could be disputed by insurance: title signed but by your aunt and uncle but not you, aunt and uncle driving, etc. Most insurance companies have a form of "gap coverage" for you when you get a quote and sign a title or bill of sale, but if you're not signing...this is why the limited power of attorney is important.

Last question - you have a sequoia and a tundra and are getting a 100? How come?
 
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GTV

Joined
Jan 31, 2019
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Si'ahl
The 100 in question has an extensive and highly detailed history here on mud. If it's not as advertised we've all been duped.

I like the plan to meet at my aunt & uncles bank, that's perfect. Then have them send the title to me via certified mail so I can register it.

One question, how do I give them limited POA?

I had a Tundra for 14 years, sold it last fall to a friend. I bought the Sequoia in January of last year (selling it on Friday to a coworker), had some fun with it but when I started hanging out on mud it didn't take me long to "get it".
 
Joined
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Seattle
Most importantly, let us know when you get it back to Seattle. The local clubhouses here are painfully quiet and I miss having a community to drive and wrench with.
 

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