Anyone carry/use an electric Chain Saw?

e9999

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did you see a significant difference when using the high torque mode if you tried that?
 
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No, I didn't try the high torque models. They increment buy about $100 each model as you go up, and I would imagine they are better "but" they are also larger.

This 06 is miniature, and in the bag it packs about the size of a pair of running shoes. Those larger ones are more like full size saws.

The makita 06 is definitely perfect for a small trail saw... provided you not dealing with "large" trees.
 

e9999

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IIRC, the 06 has a high torque mode that you get to by holding the power switch for a bit. The light will then turn from green to amber. And supposedly it gives higher torque then, but that does not seem to be what people observe, so may be just Makita marketing.
 
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Interesting .. I never did read the manual. .. It does turn to amber if you hold it down when turning it on, I try that tomorrow.
 

e9999

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where did you buy that saw so cheap, if I may ask? Cheapest I've seen for the bare saw is $211. And $350 for the kit with the batteries worth about $65 each IIRC.
 
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amazon was 340 for saw and two 5ah batteries and the charger.
at Home Depot two 5ah batteries are 160 and the charger is 103 so I used that split for some rough math.
340 - 160 - 103 = 77

It wasn't that great of a deal, but it was better buy in it with the batteries than as tool only. They also had some tools where you get and extra 2 batteries (4 in total) but the 06 was not included in those deals.
 

e9999

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well, HD does its thing, but I have often seen new Makita brand 18V chargers online for somewhere between $20 and $30. Batteries also are likely cheaper online than HD. But no matter, around $350 sounds like a good value for that saw and kit if you are not already in the Makita system. I like the saw -well on paper and vid at least, since I have not used it myself-.

But back to the main question, and not to fixate on the 06, I do wonder how long the 18V is going to remain a good option, though. I would think we are likely to move on to higher voltages as batteries get better. Except that the higher voltage batteries are all over the place right now with no standardization in sight.

So, what I'd want to know about is how long the batteries will be available for any cordless tool -like a saw- that I buy today. And, of course, I don't know that. But I do know that I am runnning a 30 year old gas saw, with plenty of parts available today. I also know I don't have any 30 years old cordless tool with batteries still usable or purchasable, though. Now admittedly, I guess many people are not working on a 30 years horizon and are fine with chucking a tool after 5 years and getting a new one, so they may not care.

Either way, we should count our blessings in the US, price wise. I have often seen Makita and Dewalt tools sold in Europe at prices that would send most of us into shock-induced coma...
 
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Good point & question.
I am still using my Dewalt 18 Volt tools from 2004... but they are near end of life as they are not brushless.

I'll be using this small saw and they have a weed wacker which I plan to get. At least Makita has been doubling up their 18 Volt batteries instead of coming out with new battery variations which the other manufactures have been doing. Another reason I went with Makita.

As for cutting up the remainder of that tree... my Stile gas saw is what I'll be using.
 

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do you have any batteries from 2004 that are still working? But that they are still selling batteries at a reasonable price for those tools after 15 years is pretty good, actually.

Yes, it's interesting that Makita is holding on to the 18V batteries platform. I like that too, although it may be just prolonging the inevitable.
 
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I have the Makita XCU03PT1, and have found it to be perfect for my needs. Had a Stihl 026, but I do not use a chainsaw often enough for it not to be a problem when I do need to use it. Hard start, not running right, etc.

Anyway, the Makita is lighter, well balanced, and cuts well. Got to let it work, you cannot lay into it or it will stall. It will cut its full bar length (14"). The 5Ahr batteries do deplete fast, but that is why the kit includes four I guess. I carry it when we go camping, or out on the trails.
 

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I've been carrying a Makita cordless chainsaw in the truck for longer trips and it is great for incidental downed trees and preparing firewood. Shares batteries with a cordless impact wrench... It has proved very useful.
 

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here is another take on this. Interesting. I suppose one can debate if it's a valid comparison. And of course it's not about just a couple of quick cuts on the trail. But it does address a bit the issue of batteries which has been on my mind as far as the bigger picture with the large cordless tools.


 
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Great video. Clearly demonstrates the great value of having an electric along on an offroad/camping excurison. Don't think many of us will need to cut as much as he was able to cut, or as such thick trees, to produce an adequate amount of firewood or clear a tree or three across a road.
 

e9999

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yes, but it also reinforces the notion that you need some seriously big batteries to get much done with an electric saw. It is probably a misconception to think that a little 2Ah 18V battery will do very much for you. Which in turn would mean big bucks for batteries. Then again, if you have a big shop system already, that may not be so outlandish.
 
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Fortunately all the modern ones do come with large batteries so it isn’t an issue. I am amazed at the amount of work I get out of mine, and since I have 2 batteries it really lasts a long time. In truth anything needing 2 batteries probably was a bigger job where the gas saw would have been the better tool. But one battery is more than enough to limb and buck a medium tree. I used one battery to fully limb a very large oak, then got the gas saw to buck up the 18” rounds. I could never see myself doing that much trail/camping work ever so the electric has been my goto and doing awesome
 
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I use the Harbor Freight Bauer 20v with the 3.0 Ah battery and I have been very happy so far. This saw gets left in the rig or the RV at all times. The battery lasts a long time. I can't give an exact number and I'm sure that's online somewhere anyway. What I can tell you is it cut enough firewood for a three day weekend where two of the mornings I woke up to an inch of snow on the ground.

As far as safety there is no actual chain brake. It does require you to press a button to unlock the trigger to allow the saw to run and as soon as you release the trigger the chain stops.

My friend was so impressed with mine that he went to Harbor Freight to get his own but decided he wanted the larger Lynxx one instead. So far he has also been very happy.
 

e9999

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since we talked a bit about chaps earlier, here is a new vid on chaps and electric saw. Not entirely conclusive and a clickbait title but at least there is some real world info:
 
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