Anyone carry/use an electric Chain Saw?

Joined
Jan 23, 2019
Messages
492
Location
Florida
Anyone carry and use an electric Chain Saw?

Where I go we sometimes have fallen trees (small ones) or when gone for more than 5 days like to saw up some dead wood for the fire.

I've been thinking about carrying a small 12" or 16" saw for this plus I can use it around my place to small stuff.

Our local power company gives all the trucks Mikitas 12", as they pack small. I kind of like the husqvarna but and not used either.

Any Recommendations?
 

e9999

You want to do what...?
Moderator
 
 
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Messages
16,867
Location
US
been looking at cordless ones a bit recently. Gravitating towards the new Makita XCU06, but mostly because of arborism needs and that one is particularly light, fast, and compact. Also because of battery compatibility with many other tools.
Overall impression about the field is that the power of cordless saws is getting reasonable but the battery run times is a limiting factor still.
 
Joined
Feb 26, 2007
Messages
1,512
Location
Lancaster, PA
I think @jamarquardt22 in Keystone Cruisers one and really likes it.
I have a Ryobi with a 12 inch bar. It runs on the 18 volt battery. It's small light and meets my needs in Suburbia. It's the brushless version. So far I've used it to cut a 10 inch piece of Ash. It cuts but you can't force it you need to remember it's electric. Battery life so far has been better than expected.
 
Joined
Nov 26, 2009
Messages
42
Location
Virginia
I have the Husqvarna 120i cordless 40v and love it. I bought it for small jobs in the yard when I didn’t want to break out the gas Stihl and it has been able to handle more than I expected. I also have taken it off-road and camping and it has been handy as well as quieter when gathering firewood.

While I recommend it...I bought it last year and am not sure how it now compares to other available models. I did add the Husqvarna cordless hedge trimmer to stay in the same battery family so I have 2 batteries. I am also considering their cordless blower and /or string trimmer as upgrades to my older and weaker Worx blower and trimmer. That said, there are a few other brands that have a broader set of cordless tools if keeping your options open for other tools is important to you. Husqvarna only seems to offer a few basics so I would give consideration to lines like Makita and Ryobi.

Over the years I keep seeing how expansive the Ryobi 18v line is with cool tool so that part of me wished I had bought into it. Then i’d Have multiple tools and multiple batteries. You can add tools every year and keep getting fresher batteries which keeps your initial investment lasting longer. The multiple 18v batteries are as good as larger 40v battery, especially if you are just cutting up limbs and smaller logs for the campfire.
 

e9999

You want to do what...?
Moderator
 
 
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Messages
16,867
Location
US
from a pure weight and handling point of view, only one smallish 18/20 V battery onboard is better but there is something to be said for heavier higher voltage batteries too, typically longer runs of course but also hopefully higher torque. In the former case, having several spares handy will keep you going, but dang batteries are just so expensive when bought separately, though, that it makes sense to buy some tool and batteries packages when on sale at christmas etc (loss leaders) to build up your battery supply. You'd want an extensive lineup of good tools, then. Or look for deals. My local ace right now has a $400 2x18V makita saw for sale that comes with an extra two 5Ah batteries (and charger) for a total of 4. Those batteries are about $100 each when bought separately, so the saw is free, so to speak.

I don't think Ryobi is in the same quality class as Makita.
 
Joined
Jun 12, 2015
Messages
200
I have the corded Makita with a 16 inch bar. Cuts as well as my Husqvarna saw but much lighter and quieter and you don’t have to mix gas. I have one of the quiet 2000 watt generators that I bring along if I’m glamping. It powers the saw with no problem.
 
Joined
May 18, 2017
Messages
511
Location
Vernon, BC
Friend of mine has the Milwaukee electric chainsaw with the 12amp battery and it is a phenomenal tool. Instant start in any weather, super quiet, more than capable of clearing the average trail, cutting a ton of firewood, and still having juice left over. I want one myself to replace the gas Husqvarna I have.
 
Joined
Jan 23, 2019
Messages
492
Location
Florida
Thanks .. I'll have to check out that deal at ACE !

Found it and a good compare the little Mill vs the 14" mill 18 seconds vs 4 seconds on a cut.

at the 3:05 mark.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jun 19, 2018
Messages
295
Location
Seattle, Wa USA
I'm pretty heavily invested into the Milwaukee cordless tool and battery family, I've been looking for an excuse to grab the Milwaukee saw, but I wish it was just a bit smaller. My neighbors just had an arborist at their place, and he had the Husqvarna stuff. I didn't pay attention to the model (12" bar maybe), but he and his 2 guys said that it's an awesome small saw. He also had a bigger Kobalt brand with a 60volt battery that he grabbed at a pawn shop. He said it was decent, but heavy.
 

e9999

You want to do what...?
Moderator
 
 
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Messages
16,867
Location
US
The Makitas have a wide range of chainspeeds with the new little 06 the fastest at something like 4700 fpm IIRC. That makes a big difference in cutting speed I think. The 03 above is like 4000. The little guy in the vid is probably an 02, that's only 1700 fpm. And brushless gives you mo' powa' too. I must say I like their keeping the 18V line strong and using 2 batts for 36V instead of going to higher voltage with humongous batteries like some brands do. You can't very well use those high cap 60V or 80V etc for anything else but big outdoor tools like a chainsaw, trimmer or blower really. They probably weigh as much as the bare tool.
This is tempting enough that I'm now seriously thinking about restarting a Makita set...
Can't say I'm fond of some of those toolless chain adjustment mechanisms, though.
 
Joined
Jan 23, 2019
Messages
492
Location
Florida
Thanks for the help,

Although Husqvarna is my favorite gas powered tool manufacture, I went with the Mikita XCU06T.

Mikita has a whole line of new mini's.. XCU06T, 08PT and 09PT. Since this is for small stuff the 06 will pack best and charge easiest.

Has anyone tried the off brand lithium 5ah batteries on the tools? These batteries are less than 1/2 the price. Do they work .. or are they junk?
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jul 26, 2016
Messages
78
Location
Northern VA
I recently got the Snapper cordless 18" chainsaw, but I haven't used it yet. It uses the same 82V batteries as my mower, trimmer, and blower. I got a couple of packages on Amazon, as well as an extra battery, so I have a spare charger if I want to take it on the road. I'd take two batteries and recharge one via the inverter while driving.
 
Joined
Jan 8, 2012
Messages
504
My buddy and I have a small arborist company. I’ve very seriously considered investing in Husky T536Li for in tree stuff the comparable Sthil version hasn’t made it over here yet. But that’s top handle, not super great for ground work. For light duty down low, I’ve honestly thought about buying the Harbor Freight Lynx brand electric saw and paying extra for the protection package and just using the snot out of it. If it breaks, get a free new one.
 

e9999

You want to do what...?
Moderator
 
 
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Messages
16,867
Location
US
Fisher, tell us how you like the 06. Tempted myself. Have had my eye on that one since it came out. I especially like the low weight. Like 7 lbs with the battery. That's better than just about anything out there. I think the Stihl 150 is even a bit more than that, although admittedly when I held both in the store they felt pretty similar. There is a vid out there of some arborists doing much of a removal with an 06. Were taking down some pretty big limbs up there with it too...

As to an aftermarket replacement battery, I would only vaguely consider it if I were sure it has legit cells in it, and probably not even then cuz you still don't know about the circuitry and if that one is no good, even legit cells could be done for fast. So, unless money is very tight, personally I'd stay with branded batteries.

I will also add a freebie semi-PSA : I think there is a bit of a danger with cordless chainsaws that some folks may be less cautious with those than with the fiery noisy gas ones that rightfully instill fear in most everybody. The cordless ones are almost silent, don't vibrate as much, are lighter, feel more like a toy etc. This makes for a package that is easy to underestimate. But they sure are no toy and deserve full respect. I was almost painfully reminded of this when I started to cut for the first time with a corded one a while back. Was thinking this thing can't be very powerful. Well, I was wrong and I almost got it in my face when one-handing it up high cuz it was so light. Stoopid!
 
Joined
Jan 8, 2012
Messages
504
Fisher, tell us how you like the 06. Tempted myself. Have had my eye on that one since it came out. I especially like the low weight. Like 7 lbs with the battery. That's better than just about anything out there. I think the Stihl 150 is even a bit more than that, although admittedly when I held both in the store they felt pretty similar. There is a vid out there of some arborists doing much of a removal with an 06. Were taking down some pretty big limbs up there with it too...

As to an aftermarket replacement battery, I would only vaguely consider it if I were sure it has legit cells in it, and probably not even then cuz you still don't know about the circuitry and if that one is no good, even legit cells could be done for fast. So, unless money is very tight, personally I'd stay with branded batteries.

I will also add a freebie semi-PSA : I think there is a bit of a danger with cordless chainsaws that some folks may be less cautious with those than with the fiery noisy gas ones that rightfully instill fear in most everybody. The cordless ones are almost silent, don't vibrate as much, are lighter, feel more like a toy etc. This makes for a package that is easy to underestimate. But they sure are no toy and deserve full respect. I was almost painfully reminded of this when I started to cut for the first time with a corded one a while back. Was thinking this thing can't be very powerful. Well, I was wrong and I almost got it in my face when one-handing it up high cuz it was so light. Stoopid!
That last bit... 👌🏽. Haven’t used one yet, but I’ve thought the same thing. Less noise=less caution.
 
Top Bottom