4x4labs rear bumper build

1997 FZJ80 40th

James Jennings
Joined
Apr 23, 2008
Messages
166
Location
San Antonio, Texas
 
 
Some Questions for those who have purchased a 4x4 bumper as a kit and did the welding themselves: What is the thickness of the heaviest gauge piece that needs to be welded for assembly? It appears from the description that 3/8 inch is utilized throughout, is that generally true? What would be the minimum spec Mig welder that could do the job well? I have been hoping to pull the trigger on a Miller 211 (110V/220V dual voltage) for several weeks, but have needed to prioritize spending so am considering a Hobart/ or Lincoln 140 (110V only). I suspect 3/8 steel would be pushing the limits of the Mller 211 (even at 220V) for single pass, and would be even more problematic for one of the 140 machines. Any feedback from 4x4labs or someone who has tackled this project would be greatly appreciated. I won't be making final decision as to which Welder based only on this project, but it will be factored heavily.
 

1997 FZJ80 40th

James Jennings
Joined
Apr 23, 2008
Messages
166
Location
San Antonio, Texas
 
 
Thanks for the quick response LC Phil. So I understand the Hobart 187 is a 220V machine with similar duty cycle and specs to the Miller 211 (when used in 220V). That would be good news if I end up with the Miller 211. Do you have any thoughts on whether the smaller 110V machines would suffice?

Anyone else? Thanks.
 

LandCruiserPhil

Peter Pan Syndrome
Supporting Vendor
Joined
Mar 10, 2004
Messages
24,801
Location
Scottsdale Arizona
 
 
 
Thanks for the quick response LC Phil. So I understand the Hobart 187 is a 220V machine with similar duty cycle and specs to the Miller 211 (when used in 220V). That would be good news if I end up with the Miller 211. Do you have any thoughts on whether the smaller 110V machines would suffice?

Anyone else? Thanks.
Personally I would not attempt the bumper with a 110V. FWIW I also have a 110v Lincoln.
 
Joined
Oct 11, 2011
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2,408
Location
Sarasota, FL
I second that even if you're using gas 110 isn't going to cut the mustard. An old Lincoln tombstone 220 that plugs onto your dryer outlet would and I see those often for $100-150 on CL.

I think anyone can learn to lay down nice stick welds before they get thru the first box of rods.
 
Joined
Oct 10, 2010
Messages
241
Location
Savannah,Ga
You can use a 110v just fine be it a lincoln 140 or equivalent. Instead of one pass. Do a hot pass and two more passes over the hot pass.
Hot pass is the center bead joining the two templates.
2nd pass is on the bottom side of the hot pass over lapping the hot pass by 50%.
Lastly, the 3rd pass is on the top side of the hot pass overlapping the hot pass by 50%.
This will provide more strength to your weld. You will see under the lid on the side of a Lincoln 140 machine, suggesting 3 passes for 3/16.
I have done this plenty of times in Afghanistan building security obstacles, because material is limited you have to improvise. My 3/16 to 1/2 steel security obstacles were built with 110v hobart 140 handler. Of course I did 3 passes or more. They stopped plenty of enemy vehicles without the weld breaking. I tell you, the vehicle didn't hold up as well as me welds and obstacle.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Oct 10, 2010
Messages
241
Location
Savannah,Ga
Tire carrier kit
I am just wondering, but first beautiful bumpers. This is regarding the tire carrier, the square tubing clap with the two bolts to hold the square tubing of the tire carrier bracket, I believe its item number(5), It looks a bit slopped, a downward slope, can you skip that piece all together and just weld the two square tubing together?

Thank you,
P.S. Great work.
 

sl33p3

still waking up...
Joined
Oct 13, 2009
Messages
1,240
Location
ABQ, NM
 
I am just wondering, but first beautiful bumpers. This is regarding the tire carrier, the square tubing clap with the two bolts to hold the square tubing of the tire carrier bracket, I believe its item number(5), It looks a bit slopped, a downward slope, can you skip that piece all together and just weld the two square tubing together?

Thank you,
P.S. Great work.
do you mean weld the tire carrier upright directly to the swingarm? of course you could i guess. but you'd have a heck of time unbolting nonexistant bolts it if you ever wanted to? i think i am missing something?

and i agree on the bumper kit. i LOVE mine, beat the snots out of it and a little rustoleum forgives all sins.

*edit. i think you mean weld the upper tire holder to the upright? if you do that you can't adjust the clearance form the tire to the upright carrier bar... if you were never going to run a different tire or gave yourself a lot of room i suppose you could.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jul 20, 2004
Messages
24,774
Location
Chandler, AZ
 
 
...
*edit. i think you mean weld the upper tire holder to the upright? if you do that you can't adjust the clearance form the tire to the upright carrier bar... if you were never going to run a different tire or gave yourself a lot of room i suppose you could.
Yes, but, if you have fab tools, it wouldn't be much work to cut it off and reweld in the needed position for the new tire. :meh:
 
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