Suspension recommendation for 'Underlanding' (2 Viewers)

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Disclaimer: Underlanding = Not-Overlanding = ClickBait. In any case:

New Year's Eve trip was 68 miles of dirt, 56 of those on a rattle-your-teeth dirt road. Tires at 10 psi, and around mile 40 it started to occur to me that perhaps I want different springs or shocks...
I drove Claudia's LX (similar setup as below, same tires) for a mile, and it was noticeable better at 18psi.

That's our '93: ~ 2" lift of unknown origin (probably OME, but no more tags on the springs; coil wire diameter larger than stock but tables from Slee and Kurt give different results there), 315 ProComp XMT2s. Not sure about the shocks, either. 1/2" spring spacer in the front. Yellow caster bushings. Bump stops extended in the rear. Other than that: Slee shortbus front bumper with HF 12k winch & synthetic rope, single battery, WKOR sliders. Spare tire inside, light duty tool box, recovery gear including strap, rope extension, a few steel shackles and a snatch block.

NO: roof rack/roof top tent/hang-all-your-life's-belongings-on-the-rear-steel-bumper/inside sleep platform/storage drawer system/long-range gas tank. Not even a trash-a-roo. I do have a HAM radio, though. No towing, and no future plans to do so.

I want something softer, in the 2-2.5" lift range. I'm roughly aware what's available, but wouldn't mind hearing what works for others with a similar application. Thanks in advance - michael
 

Delta VS

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Progressive/dual-rate/variable rate springs and the most expensive shocks you can afford are going to be what sets this right. Large diameter (2.5” diameter or more) remote reservoir shocks of any brand (whether they’re adjustable or not) are going to make the biggest difference.
 

Road Apple

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Here’s a good article reviewing the Slinky stage 4 setup, which has 2.5 remote reservoir shocks. I’m currently installing the same setup, so don’t have direct experience yet. The Slinky has a comprehensive system designed and tuned for the FJ80.
(615) 283-3454


Dobinson has a large selection of options as well. They will talk to about how you use your truck. Taking into account weight, tire size, and terrain, they can find the right system for you.
(305) 424-8353
 

Delta VS

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The Slinky has a comprehensive system designed and tuned for the FJ80.
I would actually temper that statement with a note about how the Slinky kit is specifically valves for overweight 80 Series. Unless you go all the way to Stage 5 that has individual compression and rebound damping.

The only other shocks that have that capability (adjustable compression AND rebound) are the Dobinsons MRA shocks.

Edit: I believe the BP-51s also have both adjustable compression and rebound. Maybe @cruiseroutfit can verify.
 
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Road Apple

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I would actually temper that statement with a note about how the Slinky kit is specifically valves for overweight 80 Series.
I would actually temper that statement with a note about how the Slinky kit is specifically valves for overweight 80 Series. Unless you go all the way to Stage 5 that has individual compression and rebound damping.

The only other shocks that have that capability (adjustable compression AND rebound) are the Dobinsons MRA shocks.
I agree that Slinky is good for heavier trucks. Icon for lighter trucks. Thanks
 

Delta VS

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I agree that Slinky is good for heavier trucks. Icon for lighter trucks. Thanks
Yup.

EDIT: @Box Rocket added some info below about Slinky parts, also, I am discussing shocks not springs in this post

Now that I'm not on my phone...

The job of your springs is to hold the weight the vehicle and all it's contents.
The job of your shocks is to make the ride comfortable.

The way your shocks make the ride comfortable is by keeping the "pogo" effect of a plain spring to a minimum. This involves TWO valves (in the most basic of shocks). One that controls the compression stroke (when the axle is moving up towards the chassis) and one the controls the rebound stroke (when the axle is moving away from the chassis).

The larger the diameter of the shock body, the bigger these valves can be. The bigger a valve can be, the more finely it can be tuned. Main benefit of larger diameter shock body is more fluid though, which a reservoir can add to as well.

On the Icon/Slinky/King/Fox/ADS/whatever shocks (with the exception of the Slinky Stage 5), only the compression is externally tunable (and only if you pay the premium for adjustable reservoirs), so the "as built" rebound tune plays a role. These rebound tunes ARE adjustable, but the shock has to be disassembled to do so.

On the OME BP-51s, Dobinsons MRA, and the Slinky Stage 5, you also get external control of the rebound. This means a mostly adjustable shock without the need for disassembly. There are still guts that can still be changed out to modify shock behavior, but 90-ish % of the ride can be dealt with on the shock with no (or very basic) tools. There is still a considerable difference between the Slinky Stage 5 and the OME/Dobs offerings though, with the Slinky Stage 5 being actual external bypass shocks. All the other adjustable shocks, in all cases (that I'm aware of) are internal bypass.

I have spent the last 1.5 years with the non-adjustable Icon remotes on my 94. I have taken them off and retuned twice (via disassembly) based on vehicle weight. The next step for me is to swap out the parts and upgrade to adjustable reservoirs. 1.5 years is a good base to compare between the adjustable and non in my mind. This will give me some good insight on how they are set up.

After much discussion with the owner of Slinky at Cruise Moab and when he visited our shop (but NOT an official representative of the company), the Slinky kits are specifically designed for painless user experience on heavy rigs. Pretty sure only available in one lift height, to be paired with their springs. I'm sure someone like @Box Rocket can correct if that is wrong though.

Icon kits are designed around "stock-ish" to medium weight rigs and have a single compression adjuster. Can be had in two lengths (stock to medium lift AND tall to really tall lift).

Dobinsons MRA shocks have 2 compression adjusters (one high speed one low speed) and one rebound adjuster. Can be had it two lengths (stock to medium lift AND tall to really tall lift).

OME BP-51s I am not schooled in. Hopefully @cruiseroutfit has time to explain those a bit more. Have only seen them available for stock to medium lifts, not sure if available for taller lifts.

King has same basic setup as Icon.
 
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Road Apple

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Pretty sure only available in one lift height, to be paired with their springs.
Great info on shock construction!!
Edit:
Slinky is available in 50mm and 75mm lift height for the 80. From what Albert at Mill Creek Overland explained, all customers receive the same front springs, which are heavy duty. Rear spring weights are intermediate, heavy, and extra heavy duty. To move up the extra heavy duty, it requires at least 1600 lbs/725 kg of additional weight added to the truck.
 
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Delta VS

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Slinky is available in 75mm lift height for the 80. 50mm for the 100. From what Albert at Mill Creek Overland explained, all customers receive the same front springs, which are heavy duty. Rear spring weights are intermediate, heavy, and extra heavy duty. To move up the extra heavy duty, it requires at least 1600 lbs/725 kg of additional weight added to the truck.
I'm only referring to shock lengths
 

Box Rocket

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Yup.

Now that I'm not on my phone...

The job of your springs is to hold the weight the vehicle and all it's contents.
The job of your shocks is to make the ride comfortable.

The way your shocks make the ride comfortable is by keeping the "pogo" effect of a plain spring to a minimum. This involves TWO valves (in the most basic of shocks). One that controls the compression stroke (when the axle is moving up towards the chassis) and one the controls the rebound stroke (when the axle is moving away from the chassis).

The larger the diameter of the shock body, the bigger these valves can be. The bigger a valve can be, the more finely it can be tuned. Main benefit of larger diameter shock body is more fluid though, which a reservoir can add to as well.

On the Icon/Slinky/King/Fox/ADS/whatever shocks (with the exception of the Slinky Stage 5), only the compression is externally tunable (and only if you pay the premium for adjustable reservoirs), so the "as built" rebound tune plays a role. These rebound tunes ARE adjustable, but the shock has to be disassembled to do so.

On the OME BP-51s, Dobinsons MRA, and the Slinky Stage 5, you also get external control of the rebound. This means a mostly adjustable shock without the need for disassembly. There are still guts that can still be changed out to modify shock behavior, but 90-ish % of the ride can be dealt with on the shock with no (or very basic) tools. There is still a considerable difference between the Slinky Stage 5 and the OME/Dobs offerings though, with the Slinky Stage 5 being actual external bypass shocks. All the other adjustable shocks, in all cases (that I'm aware of) are internal bypass.

I have spent the last 1.5 years with the non-adjustable Icon remotes on my 94. I have taken them off and retuned twice (via disassembly) based on vehicle weight. The next step for me is to swap out the parts and upgrade to adjustable reservoirs. 1.5 years is a good base to compare between the adjustable and non in my mind. This will give me some good insight on how they are set up.

After much discussion with the owner of Slinky at Cruise Moab and when he visited our shop (but NOT an official representative of the company), the Slinky kits are specifically designed for painless user experience on heavy rigs. Pretty sure only available in one lift height, to be paired with their springs. I'm sure someone like @Box Rocket can correct if that is wrong though.

Icon kits are designed around "stock-ish" to medium weight rigs and have a single compression adjuster. Can be had in two lengths (stock to medium lift AND tall to really tall lift).

Dobinsons MRA shocks have 2 compression adjusters (one high speed one low speed) and one rebound adjuster. Can be had it two lengths (stock to medium lift AND tall to really tall lift).

OME BP-51s I am not schooled in. Hopefully @cruiseroutfit has time to explain those a bit more. Have only seen them available for stock to medium lifts, not sure if available for taller lifts.

King has same basic setup as Icon.
Oh boy. How do I correct all the mistakes in this post? Just kidding. Dave is correct on most points and descriptions here. I'll just add a few comments regarding the Slinky kits and options they offer.

Edit: Dave just mentioned the single height available for Slinky kits was referring to the shocks, not the coils. This is true as far as I know. The compressed and extended length of the shocks are the same throughout the more common kits, but the stage 1 and stage 4 have a full 12" of travel and with the right setup will use every bit of that 12". The stage5 shocks (I'll say more below) are slightly longer and have 14" of travel

The only real correction I would make is that there are Slinky kits that work great on lighter trucks. But I would say that 90% of the 80s I see on here are not what I'd call light 80s so the heavy duty Slinky kit would work well on most of those rigs.

There are different lift heights available from Slinky kits. There are 50mm (2") and 75mm (3") as the most common. I believe its possible to get additional coil options but those are the most common. These are offered in three different spring rates. Slinky doesn't publicly share the numbers of the spring rates (that I'm aware of) but there are intermediate, heavy duty and extra heavy duty springs available. The intermediate coils are a great option for lighter 80s. If you're building the rig with many of the common modifications like bumpers, winch, roofrack etc then my personal opinion is that the Heavy Duty spring is the best choice for the loads. The intermediate and heavy duty Slinky coils are tapered, dual rate coil springs. The Extra Heavy duty are specifically designed for a heavier CONSTANT load. So for the heaviest rigs these are a good option. Remember these were originally designed with a focus on Australian builds which can be extremely heavy, like 10,000lbs constant load. I know two guys here on MUD that have had the Heavy Duty coils and have stepped up to the Extra heavies because of the weight of their 80s. @Dirty Koala and @96bruizer are two that I know that have moved to the EHD coils (there may be others too) and they've been happy with them and can weigh in if they want. I know both of them use their trucks pretty hard. Edit: One other thing I'll add...
As I've had questions from numerous people asking about my experience with the Slinky coils and looking for recommendations I've been surprised how many think they have heavy trucks and think they need the EHD coils. I think it's a much smaller percentage of trucks that could really use the EHD coils. Get your truck weighed. For point of reference, my 80 is 7500lbs loaded. I don't use the EHD coils. I personally wouldn't consider the EHD coils until you're rig has at least surpassed 8000lbs.

A couple things to note on the EHD Slinky coil, they are not a dual rate and function better as a linear rate coil since they are handling heavier loads. They have a slightly taller free height (1" I think) than the HD coils.

As for the shocks. If you have a lightweight rig, the Slinky stage 1 kit works really well. The shocks are a 2.0 smooth body so you don't get any adjustment but the valving is really good IMO for the average 80, one of the best I've experienced. Once you get to the point where you are either driving your rig pretty hard (I'm not talking about rock crawling, but offroad situations that will rapidly extend and compress the shock to the limits of travel) then the Stage 1 shocks become less adequate. Rock crawling will push the shocks to the limits of extension and compression but it's usually not a rapid change and hard bottom outs. So if you're just a rock crawler that just drives mild trails to get to the hard stuff then the stage 1 could be an excellent shock. The stage4 Slinky shocks are the most commonly used adjustable shocks in the Slinky kits. These are 2.5 external reservoir (remote or piggyback) with 10 point CDC (compression) adjustability. Dave is correct that the rebound is not adjustable on these shocks. That said, I ran these shocks for the past 3 years and I feel like the rebound setting is quite good. The compression adjustability was great to be able to firm up the shocks for hard running or when increasing loads. I ran this setup hard for the 3 years I had it, with numerous times getting the truck airborne and running them hard and fast for hours. Personally, I've never been able to run them hard enough and long enough to cause enough heat for them to have any shock fade. That same hard running would get a small amount of fade in the stage 1 shocks. These shocks also have an internal hydro bump. Even though the rebound isn't adjustable on these shocks they are very good and will put a smile on your face if you like driving hard and if you want a really good ride on road as well as when pushing hard. FWIW, the stage4 shocks I ran never required a rebuild during the 3 years and roughly 60K miles that I had them. That length of durability isn't always possible when dealing with higher end shocks.

This past year I upgraded to the Stage5 Slinky shocks. These are the same dimensions as the stage4 shocks with a 2.5 body and external reservoir and internal hydro bump but introduces true external bypass tubes with 25 point adjustable compression AND rebound. The increased amount of adjustability is nice but can take some time to dial in. It was recommended to me that when making adjustments, that the knob should be turned 5 clicks to make a noticeable difference and then back it off as needed to dial it to where you want it. They're able to be fine tuned with 25 points of adjustment to get a really nice ride for any condition. I will say that since getting them I have done a lot more studying on suspension tuning to better understand the setup rather than just making arbitrary adjustments. As I've messed around with mine, I can say they are pretty incredible and I haven't experienced a better "off the shelf" suspension on an 80. The Dobinson bypass shocks as well as the BP-51s have internal bypasses. Rebound and compression is also adjustable in these but with the internal bypasses it decreases the oil volume slightly. The standard valving setups between all of these is also slightly different. I like that the Slinky/Icons don't require any tools for adjustment. The location of the knobs are very accessible and adjustment can be made in just a few seconds so playing around with different settings during a trip is easy and not cumbersome.

Sorry for the long response, but hopefully that answers most questions that may arise regarding the Slinky stuff. I'll also, note, I'm NOT an official representative of the Slinky products. Just a very happy customer that has spent far too much time researching the kits. But I have had extended experience with the stage 1, stage 4 and stage5 Slinky kits on my own 80.

Here's an image of one of my very well used Stage 4 (piggyback resivoir) rear shocks next to the stage 5 rear shock I have now. You'll notice the extra length and the two external bypass tubes. The adjustment knobs are on the ends of the bypass tubes. On the stage4 shock the adjustment knob is on the top of the reservoir.
Stage 5 Slinky by Adam Tolman, on Flickr
 
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Delta VS

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Oh boy. How do I correct all the mistakes in this post? Just kidding. Dave is correct on most points and descriptions here. I'll just add a few comments regarding the Slinky kits and options they offer.

Edit: Dave just mentioned the single height available for Slinky kits was referring to the shocks, not the coils. This is true as far as I know. The compressed and extended length of the shocks are the same throughout the more common kits, but the stage 1 and stage 4 have a full 12" of travel and with the right setup will use every bit of that 12". The stage5 shocks (I'll say more below) are slightly longer and have 14" of travel

The only real correction I would make is that there are Slinky kits that work great on lighter trucks. But I would say that 90% of the 80s I see on here are not what I'd call light 80s so the heavy duty Slinky kit would work well on most of those rigs.

There are different lift heights available from Slinky kits. There are 50mm (2") and 75mm (3") as the most common. I believe its possible to get additional coil options but those are the most common. These are offered in three different spring rates. Slinky doesn't publicly share the numbers of the spring rates (that I'm aware of) but there are intermediate, heavy duty and extra heavy duty springs available. The intermediate coils are a great option for lighter 80s. If you're building the rig with many of the common modifications like bumpers, winch, roofrack etc then my personal opinion is that the Heavy Duty spring is the best choice for the loads. The intermediate and heavy duty Slinky coils are tapered, dual rate coil springs. The Extra Heavy duty are specifically designed for a heavier CONSTANT load. So for the heaviest rigs these are a good option. Remember these were originally designed with a focus on Australian builds which can be extremely heavy, like 10,000lbs constant load. I know two guys here on MUD that have had the Heavy Duty coils and have stepped up to the Extra heavies because of the weight of their 80s. @Dirty Koala and @96bruizer are two that I know that have moved to the EHD coils (there may be others too) and they've been happy with them and can weigh in if they want. I know both of them use their trucks pretty hard. Edit: One other thing I'll add...
As I've had questions from numerous people asking about my experience with the Slinky coils and looking for recommendations I've been surprised how many think they have heavy trucks and think they need the EHD coils. I think it's a much smaller percentage of trucks that could really use the EHD coils. Get your truck weighed. For point of reference, my 80 is 7500lbs loaded. I don't use the EHD coils. I personally wouldn't consider the EHD coils until you're rig has at least surpassed 8000lbs.

A couple things to note on the EHD Slinky coil, they are not a dual rate and function better as a linear rate coil since they are handling heavier loads. They have a slightly taller free height (1" I think) than the HD coils.

As for the shocks. If you have a lightweight rig, the Slinky stage 1 kit works really well. The shocks are a 2.0 smooth body so you don't get any adjustment but the valving is really good IMO for the average 80, one of the best I've experienced. Once you get to the point where you are either driving your rig pretty hard (I'm not talking about rock crawling, but offroad situations that will rapidly extend and compress the shock to the limits of travel) then the Stage 1 shocks become less adequate. Rock crawling will push the shocks to the limits of extension and compression but it's usually not a rapid change and hard bottom outs. So if you're just a rock crawler that just drives mild trails to get to the hard stuff then the stage 1 could be an excellent shock. The stage4 Slinky shocks are the most commonly used adjustable shocks in the Slinky kits. These are 2.5 external reservoir (remote or piggyback) with 10 point CDC (compression) adjustability. Dave is correct that the rebound is not adjustable on these shocks. That said, I ran these shocks for the past 3 years and I feel like the rebound setting is quite good. The compression adjustability was great to be able to firm up the shocks for hard running or when increasing loads. I ran this setup hard for the 3 years I had it, with numerous times getting the truck airborne and running them hard and fast for hours. Personally, I've never been able to run them hard enough and long enough to cause enough heat for them to have any shock fade. That same hard running would get a small amount of fade in the stage 1 shocks. These shocks also have an internal hydro bump. Even though the rebound isn't adjustable on these shocks they are very good and will put a smile on your face if you like driving hard and if you want a really good ride on road as well as when pushing hard. FWIW, the stage4 shocks I ran never required a rebuild during the 3 years and roughly 60K miles that I had them. That length of durability isn't always possible when dealing with higher end shocks.

This past year I upgraded to the Stage5 Slinky shocks. These are the same dimensions as the stage4 shocks with a 2.5 body and external reservoir and internal hydro bump but introduces true external bypass tubes with 25 point adjustable compression AND rebound. The increased amount of adjustability is nice but can take some time to dial in. It was recommended to me that when making adjustments, that the knob should be turned 5 clicks to make a noticeable difference and then back it off as needed to dial it to where you want it. They're able to be fine tuned with 25 points of adjustment to get a really nice ride for any condition. I will say that since getting them I have done a lot more studying on suspension tuning to better understand the setup rather than just making arbitrary adjustments. As I've messed around with mine, I can say they are pretty incredible and I haven't experienced a better "off the shelf" suspension on an 80. The Dobinson bypass shocks as well as the BP-51s have internal bypasses. Rebound and compression is also adjustable in these but with the internal bypasses it decreases the oil volume slightly. The standard valving setups between all of these is also slightly different. I like that the Slinky/Icons don't require any tools for adjustment. The location of the knobs are very accessible and adjustment can be made in just a few seconds so playing around with different settings during a trip is easy and not cumbersome.

Sorry for the long response, but hopefully that answers most questions that may arise regarding the Slinky stuff. I'll also, note, I'm NOT an official representative of the Slinky products. Just a very happy customer that has spent far too much time researching the kits. But I have had extended experience with the stage 1, stage 4 and stage5 Slinky kits on my own 80.

Here's an image of one of my very well used Stage 4 (piggyback resivoir) rear shocks next to the stage 5 rear shock I have now. You'll notice the extra length and the two external bypass tubes. The adjustment knobs are on the ends of the bypass tubes. On the stage4 shock the adjustment knob is on the top of the reservoir.
Stage 5 Slinky by Adam Tolman, on Flickr
Thanks for the clarifications, I'll put an edit at the top of my post so that future folks don't get confused about shocks/springs.

For my clarification/education, all the Slinky shocks are valved for heavy vehicles, correct? As in, there aren't different shim stacks available for the same shock? This mostly applies to the rebound setup on anything adjustable, but still. Even with the CDCV, the shim stacks can be set up differently for different performance.

AND TO BE CLEAR, to my understanding, the differences in setup are much more of a "nuanced" change than a "sledgehammer" change.
 

Box Rocket

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Thanks for the clarifications, I'll put an edit at the top of my post so that future folks don't get confused about shocks/springs.

For my clarification/education, all the Slinky shocks are valved for heavy vehicles, correct? As in, there aren't different shim stacks available for the same shock? This mostly applies to the rebound setup on anything adjustable, but still. Even with the CDCV, the shim stacks can be set up differently for different performance.

AND TO BE CLEAR, to my understanding, the differences in setup are much more of a "nuanced" change than a "sledgehammer" change.
The valving in the Stage1 shock isn't the same setup that is in the stage 4 and up shocks if I'm not mistaken. This is why I say, the Stage1 shocks are well suited for lighter trucks. But, a specific answer to your question, no there are not different valving options for stage 1 shocks, or different valving choices for stage 4 shocks. The thinking is, I believe, that the vast majority that would be considering the stage 4 shocks will have a truck that fits the "heavy" definition. In other words, more than a stock truck with just lift and tires. So, (especially since they can be adjusted) there isn't a reason to provide different valving setups in the same shock.
 

SNLC

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Fox makes a compression and rebound shock for an 80. Most expensive you can buy for bolt on in an 80 from what I recall. King being the next most expensive but only has a compression adjuster.

Cheers
 

Delta VS

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The valving in the Stage1 shock isn't the same setup that is in the stage 4 and up shocks if I'm not mistaken. This is why I say, the Stage1 shocks are well suited for lighter trucks. But, a specific answer to your question, no there are not different valving options for stage 1 shocks, or different valving choices for stage 4 shocks. The thinking is, I believe, that the vast majority that would be considering the stage 4 shocks will have a truck that fits the "heavy" definition. In other words, more than a stock truck with just lift and tires. So, (especially since they can be adjusted) there isn't a reason to provide different valving setups in the same shock.
Yes, that all makes perfect sense!
 
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Thanks everyone for their input, this is really helpful. A lot of vehicles with suspension mods here seem to be on the heavier side, and therefor not comparable to my situation. But just to assure everyone - this truck is not a mall crawler, it sees dirt on a regular basis.
 

Delta VS

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There is a recycle yard not too far from our shop that will give you weight of front axle, rear axle, and combined.
 
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My girlfriends lx450 has the 3” flexi spring from dobinsons. Her car is light and she has around 2.5”. It rides great, flexes well, and is a good inexpensive option.
 

geologic

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There are sooooo many options now that it’s hard to commit to one. I think that I want a very compliant spring and shock set up, but my brother in law just did the 49 tire no nonsense 3 inch level lift with OME 2850J front springs and 2863 rear springs, Ironman Pro foam cell shocks: 45683FE front and 45682FE rear, Ironman castor plates, and OME steering damper, front and rear Slee sway bar drop blocks and Cooper LT315/75R-16 Discoverer AT3 XLT 10ply tires. The ride performance and handling were exceptional, in fact I think it rivaled or bettered the full Slee 4 inch lift that I had which was far more expensive and had custom front control arms all adjustable rear control arms and pan hards as well as a double cardan front drive shaft this lift has no extra weight on it but is a firm sport but comfortable ride. Hard to beat for the money
4A8C49A4-3411-4DE6-B433-FA6AF6EEFB46.jpeg
 
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I’m going to throw in my 2 cents worth . By no means am I a suspension expert. My experience extends from a long history of motorcycle enduro and desert racing. The important part here is quality adjustable shocks. My truck sounds very similar to yours . Front bumper, winch, sliders, roof rack but nothing hanging off the back and no heavy gear. I like to travel a lot of long rough dirt roads. Currently my truck has OME 850/860 springs with 30mm spacers up front giving me right at 23” center of hub to flare measurements . I was running OME nitro shocks to start but I wasn’t happy with them so I switched to a set of Bilstein 5100’s . What a mistake !! I was driving a fairly washboarded well traveled stretch of dirt road with the tires down at 15lbs getting my teeth rattled out and was literally passed by a Prius !!! At that point I had to make a change. I ordered a set of the adjustable Dobinsons MRR shocks from Mike at Exit off road. WOW what a difference !! I took the same 60 mile stretch of road last weekend and couldn’t believe what I had been missing. Even my wife was amazed at the difference. It just made the entire day about the scenery and the adventure instead of the pain. I’m not saying it didn’t hurt my wallet but if I had to make a choice I would give up all the other accessories on my truck before I would give up those shocks. It probably doesn’t matter which brand you go with as long as they are top quality and fully adjustable.
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