Show us your solar panel install on your 80

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Let’s see pictures of your solar panel installation on your 80. Anxious to see what others have done. Topside, flexibles, management mounting, etc.

I went down the solar panel road about 4 years ago. Glad I did. Here’s a picture of my current setup topside.

I’m considering the semi permanent installation of the flexible 100 watt renogy panel on the sliding windows. Has anyone else done that?


F74229D0-4E0C-47AF-BABC-69F85A53EE2F.jpeg
 

Comet

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I just installed a duel battery set up with a battery isolator, no solar or controller yet. I am looking forward to the responses. The slope is slippery my friend and the water looks inviting. Subscribed.
 

bajaphile

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Just food for thought, but I prefer not hard mounting panels....I've run solar for about 6 years now by propping the panels up off the truck so I can park in the shade. The only reason I am using solar is to power the fridge, so if the fridge and truck are sitting in the sun, it just seems like a lot of wasted energy.

Not to mention, there are only 3-4 months out of the year where horizontally mounted panels are even getting the direct sunlight, and that is only a few hours a day. In the winter, you're looking at very low charging rates unless you're using some very expensive, high wattage panel.

Other reasons are that most panels will degrade over time being left outside. This results in losing charging capabilities. Mounting on the roof also now takes away your ability to mount anything. I personally use a Yakima box for long trips off the grid where I need the solar.

My favorite setup so far is the Renogy folding mono panels. They are easily adjustable and withstand high winds. They fold away for easy storage in the truck.
 

musthave

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Just food for thought, but I prefer not hard mounting panels....I've run solar for about 6 years now by propping the panels up off the truck so I can park in the shade. The only reason I am using solar is to power the fridge, so if the fridge and truck are sitting in the sun, it just seems like a lot of wasted energy.

Not to mention, there are only 3-4 months out of the year where horizontally mounted panels are even getting the direct sunlight, and that is only a few hours a day. In the winter, you're looking at very low charging rates unless you're using some very expensive, high wattage panel.

Other reasons are that most panels will degrade over time being left outside. This results in losing charging capabilities. Mounting on the roof also now takes away your ability to mount anything. I personally use a Yakima box for long trips off the grid where I need the solar.

My favorite setup so far is the Renogy folding mono panels. They are easily adjustable and withstand high winds. They fold away for easy storage in the truck.
Some great points. As for the wasted energy, it's free (after the cost of hardware), so at least the cooler stays cold. I'm at .80Ah/h to cool from 94 ambient to 38 degrees. In Florida with the 2 100 Watt panels that are 5 years old, flat mounted, I get a steady 110 from about 9AM until 6PM during the summer, and about 90 during the winter. Further north and/or further south locations would obviously change that. Overall, I leave my cooler at 46 so I use very little energy.

The roof mounting works well for me, mounted just under the 80X20 cross bars. I can still "use" my roof rack as intended when I need to, with the obvious implications.

The Renogy folding mono panels seem to be a great setup, perhaps worth looking into.
 
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Just food for thought, but I prefer not hard mounting panels....I've run solar for about 6 years now by propping the panels up off the truck so I can park in the shade. The only reason I am using solar is to power the fridge, so if the fridge and truck are sitting in the sun, it just seems like a lot of wasted energy.

Not to mention, there are only 3-4 months out of the year where horizontally mounted panels are even getting the direct sunlight, and that is only a few hours a day. In the winter, you're looking at very low charging rates unless you're using some very expensive, high wattage panel.

Other reasons are that most panels will degrade over time being left outside. This results in losing charging capabilities. Mounting on the roof also now takes away your ability to mount anything. I personally use a Yakima box for long trips off the grid where I need the solar.

My favorite setup so far is the Renogy folding mono panels. They are easily adjustable and withstand high winds. They fold away for easy storage in the truck.
I agree with your thoughts. For me I am wheeling for most of the day and this is when my panel is charging my aux. battery. I usually camp in late afternoon and will park in shade if available knowing my battery is charged.
 

SmokingRocks

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Here is my setup
battery-layout-li-ion-jpg.2685369

IMG-5092.jpg

IMG-5093.jpg

IMG-5094.jpg


no it's not broken, the refresh rate of the HVAC controller was messing with the camera.
IMG-5095.jpg


I love having my panels hard mounted on the roof, they just work all the time. Not concerned about the loss of storage or "parking in the shade" because most of my long trips are in the desert where there is no shade. Also, the panels provide some shade for the vehicle anyway. Another pro for hard mounting is that you never have to worry about dicking with setting up and babysitting a solar panel & extension cord. The angle of the sun in relation to the panel argument is scientifically valid however in the real world it's never been an issue for me, even when I only had one panel.

This setup easily provides enough to run two fridge/freezers at full tilt and still has enough left over to charge up the front house and starting batteries.

More info can be found here: Multi-Battery System
 

surfpig

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Just food for thought, but I prefer not hard mounting panels....I've run solar for about 6 years now by propping the panels up off the truck so I can park in the shade. The only reason I am using solar is to power the fridge, so if the fridge and truck are sitting in the sun, it just seems like a lot of wasted energy.

Not to mention, there are only 3-4 months out of the year where horizontally mounted panels are even getting the direct sunlight, and that is only a few hours a day. In the winter, you're looking at very low charging rates unless you're using some very expensive, high wattage panel.

Other reasons are that most panels will degrade over time being left outside. This results in losing charging capabilities. Mounting on the roof also now takes away your ability to mount anything. I personally use a Yakima box for long trips off the grid where I need the solar.

My favorite setup so far is the Renogy folding mono panels. They are easily adjustable and withstand high winds. They fold away for easy storage in the truck.
Agreed. And when I have my rack mounted on the truck, it's because I, you know, need it to haul stuff.
 
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Just food for thought, but I prefer not hard mounting panels....I've run solar for about 6 years now by propping the panels up off the truck so I can park in the shade. The only reason I am using solar is to power the fridge, so if the fridge and truck are sitting in the sun, it just seems like a lot of wasted energy.

Not to mention, there are only 3-4 months out of the year where horizontally mounted panels are even getting the direct sunlight, and that is only a few hours a day. In the winter, you're looking at very low charging rates unless you're using some very expensive, high wattage panel.

Other reasons are that most panels will degrade over time being left outside. This results in losing charging capabilities. Mounting on the roof also now takes away your ability to mount anything. I personally use a Yakima box for long trips off the grid where I need the solar.

My favorite setup so far is the Renogy folding mono panels. They are easily adjustable and withstand high winds. They fold away for easy storage in the truck.
In the way I use my truck and it’s setup, the portable fold out panel I have rarely gets used. Only if we are setup and staying in one place at camp for more than 1 day, and do not leave the camp area does the portable panel help out to optimize or double my wattage due to the tent roof panel being either in the shade or at an angle where it doesn’t see the sun.

My permanent setup is great in that it is constantly connected and charging, assuming the batteries are not already at 100%. This is more of a day to day use of the solar where it is a trickle charger for your batteries. Our trucks like most cars have a parasitic drain to them and having solar always keeps the battery 100%. The panel is also secure if you leave your vehicle either in a parking lot, driveway, trailhead, camp and you have sunshine, your batteries will get charge, albeit not a perfect optimum angles. Solbian, Merlin, and Sunflare I know have very efficient panels that can grab wattage even at very low sun angles.

Of course, everybody’s setup and needs are different.
 

musthave

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Here is my setup
battery-layout-li-ion-jpg.2685369

View attachment 2735502
View attachment 2735503
View attachment 2735504

no it's not broken, the refresh rate of the HVAC controller was messing with the camera.
View attachment 2735515

I love having my panels hard mounted on the roof, they just work all the time. Not concerned about the loss of storage or "parking in the shade" because most of my long trips are in the desert where there is no shade. Also, the panels provide some shade for the vehicle anyway. Another pro for hard mounting is that you never have to worry about dicking with setting up and babysitting a solar panel & extension cord. The angle of the sun in relation to the panel argument is scientifically valid however in the real world it's never been an issue for me, even when I only had one panel.

This setup easily provides enough to run two fridge/freezers at full tilt and still has enough left over to charge up the front house and starting batteries.

More info can be found here: Multi-Battery System
I went through your solar thread. Great work.

How do you like the RowPow batteries? I use an Odyssey 2150 but would like to move to the RowPow or similar. I wonder if they could be mounted in the right rear quarter.

I’m going to be adding drawers soon so I’m trying to keep the space clear.
 

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