rear axle service photos

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snowwolf said:
Just like to add, it's far easier to use the socket/box spanner idea like you have done, but use a vice instead of the hammer, it's a more gentle and more forcefull, just like to say the photo's were great and will use your imput

Holy crap, i just pictured in my mind what you are describing and it does sound like the way to go. I'll give that a shot this time through.
 

spartan

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Did you use bolts to pull rotor and drive shaft or did they come right off / out?

TX
 

clownmidget

 
 
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Dave, you're spot on. In fact I'd say that anytime you start to tear apart your actual "focused" repair you have on hand any "complimentary" parts that might come into play once you've committed your labor. In this case, I hadn't anticipated replacing the rear disc brake pads, breaking off a lug or futzing around with the emiergency brake. But once you get in there, you notice your pads are too thin to bother putting back in, you break a lug off and you remember how crappy the e-brake is fxning. Luckily I had the rear pads around, had plenty of extra lugs and lug nuts (DO THIS NOW!- not when you really, really need one in a pickle), and luckily the e-brake pads were in great shape.

I will be flushing out the brake fluid too though as it's just good to do and costs under $10 even using synthetic.

Thanks for the reminder :cheers:

MoGas said:
Very nice write up.
The only thing that I would do differently is to use the bleed screw to relieve the brake fluid when compressing the caliper. The fluid does not circulate through the brake system, it just moves back and forth a few inches, so the fluid in the caliper has been heated and is generally pretty nasty looking and I personally, don't like the idea of forcing "dirty" fluid backwards through the system and causing potential ABS issues. You may introduce a small amount of air into the caliper this way, but, after any brake job you should bleed the brakes out anyway.



:cheers:
Dave
 

clownmidget

 
 
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dude, yeah it's in the FSM and I didnt' want to completely plagarize it :grinpimp:

I tried to touch on it above about lining up the lock nut/ring hash marks with those on the spindle so the screws will seat into the thrust washer. And Beno & Co. thread already showed the pre-load fish scale test and gives the proper torque. It's all good though...

desertdude said:
ah yeah ...I have tha manual and have the info - but thought it was good to post it here - and there is also screws on the lock ring - nice to include that too for folks who don't know :)
 

clownmidget

 
 
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Yes, if your vise is big enough and properly mounted it's a no brainer. I was by myself and my vise is sitting under the workbench unmounted so I went with my strong suit :hillbilly

You've got to not be timid in removing them, don't fear the sledge ;)

snowwolf said:
Just like to add, it's far easier to use the socket/box spanner idea like you have done, but use a vice instead of the hammer, it's a more gentle and more forcefull, just like to say the photo's were great and will use your imput
 

clownmidget

 
 
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well you asking caffeinated or not? :D

It's tough to give a true time frame because I started with the driveshaft sitting on my garage floor and the rear third absent from the rear axle. And I had just had all the cone washers wacked free less than a week before so they were not nearly as tough the first time around.

But I started Sunday around 9:30 and was finished by 4:30 including an oil change, filling the rear diff, adjusting the e-brakes, replacing the wheel lug, and the general aimless milling about with a socket in my hand and no idea what I was going to do with it. "Ever stop to think, and then forget to start?"

Echo_29 said:
Nice write-up Mike--how long did this all take?
 

desertdude

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Thanks Mike for clearing that up- I just did the removal today - had a real hard time getting the rotor off - I removed the Ebrake cable and clocked down the adjuster to the bottom - could not get the drivers side off could not even spin the wheel - I had to put a wheel back on and use it as leverage - I finally got it off after much struggle - ( only 40K miles on the 80)

Mike - you made my day much easier with this write up

( ken - please delete all my posts in your final FAQ :)
 

clownmidget

 
 
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TX, my rotors just slid off. That's also why I made note to make sure your e-brake is OFF. I can't count how many times I've seen folks struggle at this 30-sec step because they are so well trained to put that e-brake on, especially when jacking up the truck. The two small bolts 180-deg apart on the rotor are 8-mm if I remember correctly.

The driveshaft comes off with two 14-mm spanners. I use a 6-pt and a 12-pt (also a gearwrench version). I spin the driveshaft with a large screwdriver in the rear flange yoke just in front of the rear diff.

spartan said:
Did you use bolts to pull rotor and drive shaft or did they come right off / out?

TX
 

clownmidget

 
 
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beno - I know your quote! Have you heard the Duhk's version? Great first effort too.

Boston - those are the older DBA's. They have over 70K miles on them and look really good. I do have (and always tried to have) the lspv set up properly but that does seem like a really long time. Didn't think of it until you asked. That was the second set of pads I pulled from them so they are getting used.
 

FirstToy

 
 
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Great stuff Mike, great work documenting it all. :cheers:

Man, if all this stuff was published w/ color photos it would put the FSM to shame! iH8mud FSM :grinpimp:
 
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Thread resurrection - how far in should the inner axle seal that sits inside the spindle be inserted? There is a rim inside the spindle but it looks to be about 1.5" or so inside the spindle and seems a bit too far. My old ones were set about flush with the outside of the spindle. Any help would be appreciated.
 

mryanangel

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Thread resurrection - how far in should the inner axle seal that sits inside the spindle be inserted? There is a rim inside the spindle but it looks to be about 1.5" or so inside the spindle and seems a bit too far. My old ones were set about flush with the outside of the spindle. Any help would be appreciated.
Wow 13+ year resurrection.

The rear axle seals should sit flush with the outer edge of the axle tube....dont go jamming them down into the tube.
 
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Great, thanks for the answer. The FSM wasn't clear about it and mud search didn't come up with much.
 
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