Preserving Miss Kitty, circa 1964

HelloKitty65

SILVER Star
Joined
Jan 23, 2017
Messages
1,029
Location
Southwest Washington
No don't have that. Nor the pintle hook or the hand crank bracket or the winch. But those parts were not on our 40 when new.
Still looking for the dual sided turn signals.
The hand crank wasn't standard equipment anymore but it was available as a option, and there are those little screws preserving the installation holes for the hand crank's clips.
 

HelloKitty65

SILVER Star
Joined
Jan 23, 2017
Messages
1,029
Location
Southwest Washington
Keeping me on my toes. I appreciate it. 'Yes sir, may I have another'...

This is the sort of thing I like to pay attention to, to widely varying success (depending on the stage of my education). I recently noticed slight font differences in two types of ~<'1963 250 mm adjustible wrenches.
 

Bear

SILVER Star
 
Joined
Nov 2, 2005
Messages
2,205
Location
California
How critical we have all become, my friends. I remember one restoration years ago of a rare and classic Duesenberg. The judges subtracted points from a glorious restoration that also actually ran and was occasionally driven--for using modern vinyl-coated wire instead of the unsafe cotton wrapped wire of the original.

I suppose if the intended destination of a resto is to be parked never-to-be-moved in a museum with sanctified purity, then absolutely every detail MUST be as it left the factory assembly line--original paint formulations using original chemical bases, original lubes and oils, Japanese air in the tires, all the way down to including protective covers intended for shipping. Ridiculous, I know, but then again, just where do you draw the line, and who says you are the final judge of originality, not someone else with stronger or weaker opinions.

I realize John is prodding in jest, but every restorer should be able to feel successful with their hard work and attention to detail. Some of us are more obsessive about specific details than others, and deserve recognition for a job well done, but there needs to be room and praise for any of us working hard to get as close as possible to perfection, and yet not quite achieving it.

Steps off soapbox.

Oh, it is kinda fun to not have all the slots in a series of slotted screw heads not all lined up exactly the same ! In a non-conformist kind of way ! And those of us with OCD really know it as CDO, since the letters need to be in correct alphabetic order !
 

65swb45

Elder Statesman
Supporting Vendor
 
 
Joined
Apr 14, 2004
Messages
26,615
Location
818-953-9230
How critical we have all become, my friends. I remember one restoration years ago of a rare and classic Duesenberg. The judges subtracted points from a glorious restoration that also actually ran and was occasionally driven--for using modern vinyl-coated wire instead of the unsafe cotton wrapped wire of the original.

I suppose if the intended destination of a resto is to be parked never-to-be-moved in a museum with sanctified purity, then absolutely every detail MUST be as it left the factory assembly line--original paint formulations using original chemical bases, original lubes and oils, Japanese air in the tires, all the way down to including protective covers intended for shipping. Ridiculous, I know, but then again, just where do you draw the line, and who says you are the final judge of originality, not someone else with stronger or weaker opinions.

I realize John is prodding in jest, but every restorer should be able to feel successful with their hard work and attention to detail. Some of us are more obsessive about specific details than others, and deserve recognition for a job well done, but there needs to be room and praise for any of us working hard to get as close as possible to perfection, and yet not quite achieving it.

Steps off soapbox.

Oh, it is kinda fun to not have all the slots in a series of slotted screw heads not all lined up exactly the same ! In a non-conformist kind of way ! And those of us with OCD really know it as CDO, since the letters need to be in correct alphabetic order !
Well said Michael. In 1993, a Pebble Beach concors judge appraised my 1965 SWB and said it was Pebble Beach material.

It wouldn’t make it past the front gate in 2019 with 4 on the floor.

And like your wiring example, I shunned reinstalling the clamshell steering box stand for safety reasons and rebuilt a 1968 steering box for that rig. That is something that would probably still escape notice by a car show judge in 2019. But not by MUD.

OTOH, since I’ve hoarded flat screws for the marker lights, it’s also nice to know that people are now looking for such things. :grinpimp:
 
Last edited:

HelloKitty65

SILVER Star
Joined
Jan 23, 2017
Messages
1,029
Location
Southwest Washington
Where can I source Japanese air? Does it need to be Jan. 1964 air? I think I can determjne the date given the lower carbon dioxide content of the era and the Keeling curve.:flipoff2:
PS, Mark, when I get a minimum order together, I may be needing a few of those flat head screws. Unless they qualify on there own!
 
Last edited:

Bear

SILVER Star
 
Joined
Nov 2, 2005
Messages
2,205
Location
California
"Japanese air"

I realized the danger of what I wrote might be taken seriously by a fellow fanatic ! Never even gave thought to the liter of 1964 Japanese gasoline left in the tank to move the truck on and off any transports. That would be the ultimate in terms of having your ride detailed from a historic perspective.

And so for our married friends, likely safer to be obsessed with cars and perfection, than with hot movie star chicks--if your wife knows Lorena Bobbit !
 
Top Bottom