P/N for t case drive spline o ring

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Really not sure what to even call this. My searches didn’t give me anything close. Obviously from the pictures this one is screwed up, folded in in itself. What’s the replacement process like?

Humbly,

Matt
 
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I feel like I'm high right now. Which transfer case is that, and what orientation is it in?
Haha, sorry. 97 TC. Seen here is the mating surface to the transmission. Looks to be an o ring where the drive spline from the transmission goes into the t case. This would be looking from the front of the car back.
 
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This would be looking from the front of the car back.

It's rotated ~120 degrees counterclockwise (looking from the front), too, right?

I think it's part 36111B in this diagram:


That points to both the lever and the shaft seals. I think it would be p/n 90311-48025 "Seal, Oil (For Transfer Case)".

My '94 FSM only mentions it in the disassembly section and it assumes the case has been torn down enough to get to the back side.

Screenshot_20220727-123225_Adobe Acrobat.jpg


I'm not telling you to do this, but I have heard of people using this hack for motorcycle output shaft seals that would otherwise require that the crankcase be split: sometimes one can carefully peirce the body of a seal (not the lip!) with a wood screw or two and pull it out that way.
 
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80 series case.

It is not an o-ring. It is an oil seal.

PN: 90311-48025
Thank you, sir. Is it a matter of pulling out the oil seal and pushing the new one on, or some (dis)assembly required?
It's rotated ~120 degrees counterclockwise (looking from the front), too, right?

I think it's part 36111B in this diagram:


That points to both the lever and the shaft seals. I think it would be p/n 90311-48025 "Seal, Oil (For Transfer Case)".

My '94 FSM only mentions it in the disassembly section and it assumes the case has been torn down enough to get to the back side.

View attachment 3070520

I'm not telling you to do this, but I have heard of people using this hack for motorcycle output shaft seals that would otherwise require that the crankcase be split: sometimes one can carefully peirce the body of a seal (not the lip!) with a wood screw or two and pull it out that way.
Many thanks for the reference. If one were hypothetically able to perform this motorcycle hack, could one potentially drive the new seal in from the outside?
 
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If one were hypothetically able to perform this motorcycle hack, could one potentially drive the new seal in from the outside?

Unless the shaft steps down in diameter, I can't imagine why a new seal couldn't be pushed in with the shaft in place. I would lubricate the shaft with gear oil and be very careful not to damage the lip of the seal when initially pushing the seal onto the shaft. When replacing motorcycle fork seals, people often recommend wrapping Teflon tape around the end that the seal has to slide onto.

Personally, I would carefully examine the shaft for burrs, polish off that rust, and take a close look at what appears to be a groove near the end. If that's a machined groove (i.e. sharp edges and 90-degree angles), I'd wrap it with Teflon tape before trying to slide a seal lip past it. I would also order a backup seal or a cheap parts store seal to experiment with first.

Then again, the transfer case is out. If you're ever going to disassemble it, check for wear, and replace all the rubber, now is the time...
 

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