Now what?

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate
links, including eBay, Amazon, Skimlinks, and others.

Joined
Jun 23, 2016
Threads
41
Messages
2,588
Location
Wyoming MI
So my new to me Cruiser has had her baseline set. I've replaced all fluids and filters, plugs, air filter. Cleaned the throttle body. Flushed the cooling system and replaced the thermostat.
The transmission was the last to get done and I did that this morning.
Now there is nothing left to do except drive her.
She needs new speakers but that's not essential, just a want.
So what do I spend my money and free time on? Naps and video games?
Anyone else have this problem?
 
You could always buy another one. I still have things to do on my 80 and 100, so I do not have that problem, yet.
 
Clean & lube the battery post. (Keep post disconnected for 30 minutes to reset computers)
Lube the propeller shafts yokes & spiders.
Re- Torque spider bolts
Pack the wheel bearings, and axle bearing & bushing..
Replace both heater-line T's
Replace steering rack bushings
Check ball joint & tie rod ends
Clean & Condition the Leather.
Clean & seal the carpet.
Condition the plastic vinyl & rubber.
Clean & clay bar the paint.
Buff the paint.
Wax the paint
Buff the glass.
Clean & condition the undercarriage.
Flush the power steering (again)
Flush the brake fluid
Check the brake pads & rotors.
Fill the washer fluid.
Recheck coolant level after cool down.
Check front drive shaft boots.

Once done check back for more!;)
 
Do nothing else unless needed, which will not be much. IMO, over maintenance is overrated. Not necessary unless you just WANT to for the fun of it. Remember these are Land Cruisers not Land Rovers or American made vehicles. It is fun to tinker and work on these vehicles but really, it is not a necessity. I personally do not do near the maintenance that most seem to do on Mud, and I have had very good "luck".

I would also say steer your attention to the different aspects of the cooling system such as the heater line T pipes as @2001LC mentioned. That can get your hurt.
 
I have not replaced the "T"'s in the cooling lines yet. But that's a easy one.
Leathers been cleaned and conditioned. Headlights upgraded to LED.
I'm not worried about the carpet, I have kids. They're worse than a dog.

Yes the thermostat is nesaccasry. Proper engine temp is vital to longevity and MPG.

I don't "over maintain", I PREVENT breakdowns.
To me over maintaining means changing the oil and other fluids and filters to often.
 
Oh, and I've already flushed the power steering fluid however many times it takes to go through an entire gallon of Valvoline Maxlife DexIII full synthetic.
 
I just do a qt. of M1 MV full syn ATF in steering at each flush. But find that if PO had not done regularly it helps to do two to three flushes with miles driven in-between. The steering pump becomes almost silent and fluid is not so black the next day. Oh, I also make sure to clean the screen in the power steering reservoir first.

I am in the maintain by the numbers camp, following Toyota maintenance schedule as close as possible. It pays off in the long run.

I've work on a number of them that were either under maintained or improperly maintained. For me it just parts & my time to correct the damage, but to many it's very expensive shop time. These rig will last as long as one is willing to properly maintain & operate.
 
I drained my power steering by removing the supply line from the reservoir.
Then refilled. Drove for a week. Repeat until the gallon was gone.
It's super easy to do, the hardest part was catching the used fluid as it would run down the frame and shock mount and everywhere else except into my drain pan.
 
I drained my power steering by removing the supply line from the reservoir.
Then refilled. Drove for a week. Repeat until the gallon was gone.
It's super easy to do, the hardest part was catching the used fluid as it would run down the frame and shock mount and everywhere else except into my drain pan.
That is the drain and fill method often used on transmission. To me that like taking a glass of dirty water empting a little then topping with clean and repeating. I'll not drink the water, will you!

Try this:
First time: Step 1) I start with cleaning reservoir. I slid clamps down the lines, twist lines to loosen but don't pull lines off yet. Then remove reservoir from holder clip. Tip over and pour old fluid out into small bucket or large plastic cup with rag underneath to catch any spills. Then remove reservoir and clean inside using old tooth brush (custom bent using heat to bend plastic) to scrub clean internal screen along with good degreaser, follow up with hot soapy water and rinse, then high pressure air dry will speed things up. Then replace into holder and attach lower hose

Step 2) Plug upper (return line) nipple with small piece of hose pinched off and fill reservoir with fresh ATF. Now run the return line into a buck through a clear hose so you can see color of fluid. Start engine for just a few seconds, make sure not to run reservoir dry, filling with fresh fluid as it pumps out. Supper easy and even easier with helper filling as it drains.

Repeat step every other oil change.

Transmission flush is just as easy, but take 12 qt. every 15K miles.
 
Last edited:
You can go one farther and add a hose to the supply line and stick it into a gallon of new ATF.
Jack up the front of the truck and have a friend turn the steering wheel lock to lock as the new fluid is sucked in and the old pumped out.

You can do the same with the transmission.

But after working for a company that not only supplies parts washer solvent and recycles waste oil and parts washer solvent and spending 40hrs in training to learn all about solvents and oils...the drain, drive and repeat method works just as well.

I'm not arguing with your method, but the way I do it doesn't need a helper and for me that was important. My wife has gotten sick of pumping the brake pedal and turning the steering wheel and whatever else I've asked her to do...
 
I have not replaced the "T"'s in the cooling lines yet. But that's a easy one.
Leathers been cleaned and conditioned. Headlights upgraded to LED.
I'm not worried about the carpet, I have kids. They're worse than a dog.

Yes the thermostat is nesaccasry. Proper engine temp is vital to longevity and MPG.

I don't "over maintain", I PREVENT breakdowns.
To me over maintaining means changing the oil and other fluids and filters to often.


^^^^^^^^^^^^ Good Job!

Definitely get those 'Tees' replaced. You'll probably find that one of them is still good, the other 'not so much'. One of mine crumbled as soon as touched. Replaced mine with steel Tees, but I suppose OEM Tee's would be good for 100K or more.
 
Flush Transmission every 30K?

i though its every 100k for 05+!!!!
I corrected my Transmission post to 15K miles from 30K. This is for pre ~2003 before transmission change.

Check your scheduled maintenance manual for 2003 and up.
 
You can go one farther and add a hose to the supply line and stick it into a gallon of new ATF.
Jack up the front of the truck and have a friend turn the steering wheel lock to lock as the new fluid is sucked in and the old pumped out.

You can do the same with the transmission.

But after working for a company that not only supplies parts washer solvent and recycles waste oil and parts washer solvent and spending 40hrs in training to learn all about solvents and oils...the drain, drive and repeat method works just as well.

I'm not arguing with your method, but the way I do it doesn't need a helper and for me that was important. My wife has gotten sick of pumping the brake pedal and turning the steering wheel and whatever else I've asked her to do...
I've tried the jacking up & turning steering wheel with engine off. Doesn't work as well and needs bleeding afterwards.
Helper is not needed in either method, but will make job faster.

I like driving with new synthetic fluid in for some period of time, it has a cleaning effect on seals & internal parts. Rather than just pumping a ton of fluid through all at once, which gives a good clean fluid until driven.

Drain & fill method: So you'd drink the water with dirty & fresh mixed, to each his own.
 
Drain & fill method: So you'd drink the water with dirty & fresh mixed, to each his own.

To be politically correct, that would be 'integrated'. ;)


Flint.
 
^^^^^^^^^^^^ Good Job!

Definitely get those 'Tees' replaced. You'll probably find that one of them is still good, the other 'not so much'. One of mine crumbled as soon as touched. Replaced mine with steel Tees, but I suppose OEM Tee's would be good for 100K or more.

Where did you get the metal ones? That's why I haven't replaced mine yet, I don't want to stay with plastic. I want copper or aluminum if possible. But plain old steel would be just fine too.
If you got them from the hardware store what size are they?
 
I've tried the jacking up & turning steering wheel with engine off. Doesn't work as well and needs bleeding afterwards.
Helper is not needed in either method, but will make job faster.

I like driving with new synthetic fluid in for some period of time, it has a cleaning effect on seals & internal parts. Rather than just pumping a ton of fluid through all at once, which gives a good clean fluid until driven.

Drain & fill method: So you'd drink the water with dirty & fresh mixed, to each his own.

A helper helps because the engine is running the whole time, supply line in a gallon of new fluid, return line going into a empty jug. Helper turns steering wheel lock to lock while you make sure the hoses stay in their jugs.
That will flush out all of the old fluid not only in the pump but also the lines and rack and pinion.
Once the full gallon has gone through shut off engine, put hoses back, fill the system. If you don't let it run dry it'll bleed itself.
Just fill the reservoir to the brim, the system will suck in what it needs, the excess will weep out of the reservoir cap.
Check fluid level once a day until your confident you don't need to add anymore.
Then degrease the reservoir and surrounding area. D. O. N. E.
Now you can drive for as long as you like as there is no actual service interval for the power steering system.
I do mine every 50k. And that's only because fluid is cheaper than a pump. And using high mileage fluid keeps the seals from leaking too.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Back
Top Bottom