New closure of Bush Fire area

DSRTRDR

I can mangle anything ...
SILVER Star
Joined
Jan 4, 2005
Messages
15,139
Location
Baton Rouge, LA and Fountain Hills, AZ
 
 
 
Date(s): Jul 31, 2020 - Mar 15, 2021

For your safety the areas affected by the Bush Fire are closed due to the high risk of flooding. The Bush Fire was declared 100% contained on June 4, 2020 after it burned approximately 192,412 acres of the Tonto National Forest. Post-fire flooding and debris flow risks will persist through the Arizona monsoon season, tropical storm season, and winter rains.



map attached below
 

Attachments

Living in the Past

SILVER Star
Joined
Apr 21, 2005
Messages
18,802
 
 
 
Sad, but with another nonsoon instead of a monsoon the flooding and debris probably not as high a risk as a normal year. Sadly no nonsoon is becoming the norm. Average high temperature in Phoenix was 110°. Broke the old record by 4°.
 

Living in the Past

SILVER Star
Joined
Apr 21, 2005
Messages
18,802
 
 
 
There isn't enough data in to make this statement. Weather changes over time, always has always will.

Curious where this came from? I didn't blame anyone or anything. The 110° average temperature for July was simply a FACT not a opinion. The lack of rain during the monsoon is also a fact. 1017/2018 winter was the first time I ever remember since the Coconino National Forest Service started closing the road that they didn't close the roads in the forest because of no snow. I have a history with Coconino National Forest dating back to 1971. So I have a pretty good idea over that short term in history how the weather is changing.
 

zona

Rig name: Tio Nacho
Joined
May 20, 2013
Messages
805
Location
Chandler
 
Curious where this came from? I didn't blame anyone or anything. The 110° average temperature for July was simply a FACT not a opinion. The lack of rain during the monsoon is also a fact. 1017/2018 winter was the first time I ever remember since the Coconino National Forest Service started closing the road that they didn't close the roads in the forest because of no snow. I have a history with Coconino National Forest dating back to 1971. So I have a pretty good idea over that short term in history how the weather is changing.
I appreciate with the facts the comments.

The rim still gets its rain and yesterday it rained so much around Christopher Creek that the temperature dropped from 89 to 59 in one hour. I had to pull out a sweater. ahahhaa. I remember the 2017/2018 winter you're referencing too, it yielded a total 6" at Christopher Creek, argh. That was terrible.

Zona
 
Joined
Oct 11, 2015
Messages
552
Location
Sedona AZ
My point isn’t what’s to blame. How long does it take for something to be considered “the norm”? Is it 2 years, 5 years, 10 years, 100 years?

Let’s say we have a heavy monsoon next year and the year after, has the clock been reset?
 

Living in the Past

SILVER Star
Joined
Apr 21, 2005
Messages
18,802
 
 
 
I appreciate with the facts the comments.

The rim still gets its rain and yesterday it rained so much around Christopher Creek that the temperature dropped from 89 to 59 in one hour. I had to pull out a sweater. ahahhaa. I remember the 2017/2018 winter you're referencing too, it yielded a total 6" at Christopher Creek, argh. That was terrible.

Zona

I am above the rim to north at around 6,900'. We only had one decent rain in all of July. On the local FB site been mentioned the Ponderosa Pines are already dropping their needles. My driveway was paved last week and is started to be covered with needles. Normal for them is around the time the leaves change on the rim. Maybe the pines trees know what ahead for the rest of the season and getting a head start on dropping their needles.
 

zona

Rig name: Tio Nacho
Joined
May 20, 2013
Messages
805
Location
Chandler
 
That's surprising, at 6,900' you should be pretty well soaked. We've had a few good rains over here by Christopher Creek in July and yesterday we probably got 1/2"to 3/4", grass is growing tall again. We've noticed the areas of Payson, Pine and Strawberry are not getting the normal amount. I heard it hailed/rained there yesterday. Let's keep our fingers crossed we get more rains.

Zona


I am above the rim to north at around 6,900'. We only had one decent rain in all of July. On the local FB site been mentioned the Ponderosa Pines are already dropping their needles. My driveway was paved last week and is started to be covered with needles. Normal for them is around the time the leaves change on the rim. Maybe the pines trees know what ahead for the rest of the season and getting a head start on dropping their needles.
[/QUOT
 

MesquiteDweller

SILVER Star
Joined
Jan 29, 2007
Messages
5
 
 
I've actually heard that some say the heat contained in the valley due to all the cement/pavement is keeping storms from moving in. They just get pushed away on the outskirts of the valley. Don't know if there is research or evidence to show that is accurate.

You talk to old timers who remember the monsoons starting in June and it was like clockwork with rain most afternoons.

Recently the monsoons don't seem to be starting till July and now it's August and we have only had a couple storms roll in.

As a life long valley resident, the heat is becoming more unbearable every summer. The only reason I made it through June was because I knew the monsoons started in July.

If there is truth to the valley's heat keeping storms from coming in I don't know if I can survive June and July (or August) heat with no storms.

Today was a cooler day with a high of 108 but it is still 100 degrees outside at 10pm.
 

Living in the Past

SILVER Star
Joined
Apr 21, 2005
Messages
18,802
 
 
 
I've actually heard that some say the heat contained in the valley due to all the cement/pavement is keeping storms from moving in. They just get pushed away on the outskirts of the valley. Don't know if there is research or evidence to show that is accurate.

You talk to old timers who remember the monsoons starting in June and it was like clockwork with rain most afternoons.

Recently the monsoons don't seem to be starting till July and now it's August and we have only had a couple storms roll in.

As a life long valley resident, the heat is becoming more unbearable every summer. The only reason I made it through June was because I knew the monsoons started in July.

If there is truth to the valley's heat keeping storms from coming in I don't know if I can survive June and July (or August) heat with no storms.

Today was a cooler day with a high of 108 but it is still 100 degrees outside at 10pm.

I moved to the valley in 1979. Had a home around 35th and Northern. Remember times I was working in North Scottsdale and having to wait for the rains to stop and the washes to stop flowing. I know they have improved the roads so they go over the washes. Not if the washes still flow as bad couldn't answer since been since the nineties I worked in that area. Still have a home in the valley but further west. Before retiring and spending summers away there would always notice the Storms came in from the Southeast and because of the heat island most wouldn't make their way against the valley to where we are. Now seems even the Southeast valley isn't having the storms like they use to. Even the section on I-10 north of Tucson with the lighted speed limit signs that allow to lower the speed during dust storms hasn't been needed. Bought our cabin up on the rim in 2002. First few winters would shovel a path around the cabin. We had a couple of Poms that they couldn't get out of. After a few years the amount of snow slowed down. 2009 was a bumper year close to the record set in the 1960s. I have a snowplow that fits an FJ40. Last ten years I've have a garage to keep it just not enough snow to make it worth while to install the plates on the frame so I can mount the snowplow. Will hurt the value of the cruiser installing the plow so haven't bothered.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom