I really didn't want to start another birf/knuckle thread...but; (1 Viewer)

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Here's the lowdown,
It's edging into the crap time of year to wrench in the driveway. I had the work Tundra in the shop, so I thought I would hand them the FZJ80 when it was done to narrow down the possible light/vague/sloppy steering culprit. They got as far as the left front wheel bearing being loose.
I already had a full axle kit with bearings at home from @cruiseroutfit
I'm going to try out a place that lets you rent a lift and work on your own stuff. The problem is they have no onsite parts washers. For this specific job, what should I bring along?
white gas, diesel, some organic crap??? I'm going to have to double my paper towel quantity for sure.
 
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Paper towels - thick, 2 rolls minimum.
Your preferred cleaning agent
Not sure what you plan to wash, but anything other than the axle housing can do in a 1x1x1ft tub probably.
And copper wool, scotch pad, toothbrush, q-tips.
Then cloth towels for final wipe.
 
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Charlotte, NC & Alexandria, VA
Mineral spirits break down the grease faster than anything (that won't eat your hands down to the wrists), but you'll need denatured alcohol to remove that so you can regrease (you do not want mineral spirits left on surfaces you intend to grease - it'll break the grease down in a minute). If you use Simple Green, you can rinse the parts in distilled water and blow dry with shop air. The water won't hurt the parts long term, because they've been packed in grease for decades and you're going to cover them the same way again.

I have found the mortar tubs brick masons use to be invaluable. They are large enough to hold all the parts and tools for an axle seal replacement, heavy enough that they don't deform or break, made of material that is resistant to absolutely everything I've put in it so far, and not so big that you can stuff more in than you can carry. You can't beat the price. And it makes a great washtub! Just remember to bring empty milk jugs to recover the used parts washing fluids.
 

mudgudgeon

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I have a couple of old aluminum commercial bake trays that I use a lot.
They are good to lay under the hubs, if you drop any parts or grease, they land on the tray.
Plus there's room to lay out tools, or clean parts.

20201005_134716.jpg


For cleaning, I use a cut down 25 litre chemical drum, cut in half lengthwise so the screw cap and handle are still intact for easy emptying.
I tend to use low odour kerosene (lamp oil) for cleaning. I doesn't have the harsh fumes of gas, breaks down grease and oil fairly well, and you can put it in a cheap trigger spray bottle, or small weed spraying bottle with hand plunger for washing down parts
I don't have a pic of mine cut down.
They are a good size for cleaning most things in, I use it as an oil drain pan too. Easy to wipe clean too

images (5).jpeg
 
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If you are rebuilding the front knuckles I would make sure you have a bearing packer and a spatula for filling the knuckle with grease before you put the axles back in. Also using a needle adapter on your grease gun for filling the birfields will make it so you don't have to remove the inner axles to fill the inside of the birfs with new grease.
 
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Seattle, Wa USA
I appreciate the tips and suggestions. I'm assuming knuckles on a running and functioning rig are usually a level or two easier than a set of parts axles that have been sitting.
I am renting lift/shop space, so I need to get in and out with this job in 10 hours, and I may need to haul whatever fuel or chemicals I bring to clean with back home with me. (they are an actual shop space, but I didn't run down the laundry list of available on site fluid disposal types). I will have to "hand wash" my own stuff as I go.
My main concerns are just getting all of the bearing and race surfaces nice and clean for both proper inspection and to not start fresh bearings on the wrong foot.
I'm going to press my luck a bit and do new rotors, pads and calipers "while I'm in there." I'm at the wear point on all 4 wheels where things will go from bad to worse quickly if I do nothing. I have a friend I've been bribing with offers of cash and food, so hopefully we'll be able to do the left/right front simultaneously which will greatly ease the time constraints. Fingers crossed.
 

SteelHunterFJ80

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Mineral spirits break down the grease faster than anything (that won't eat your hands down to the wrists), but you'll need denatured alcohol to remove that so you can regrease (you do not want mineral spirits left on surfaces you intend to grease - it'll break the grease down in a minute). If you use Simple Green, you can rinse the parts in distilled water and blow dry with shop air. The water won't hurt the parts long term, because they've been packed in grease for decades and you're going to cover them the same way again.

I have found the mortar tubs brick masons use to be invaluable. They are large enough to hold all the parts and tools for an axle seal replacement, heavy enough that they don't deform or break, made of material that is resistant to absolutely everything I've put in it so far, and not so big that you can stuff more in than you can carry. You can't beat the price. And it makes a great washtub! Just remember to bring empty milk jugs to recover the used parts washing fluids.
Where do you take the used parts washing fluid when done? Do recycling centers or dumps take it in?
 
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I'll check at the place today, but we have household hazmat sites out here that take most stuff. My triple backup would be to bring it to a diesel guy I know and add it to his disposal tank. (depending on what I use obviously).
 

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