Fuel pump resistors replacement

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So my fuel pump resistor just blew out, i was wondering if anyone had any options or advice on whether to replace it or delete it ?
 
What do you mean it blew out? I replaced mine at 300k with another Toyota one
 
This thing is a resistor. Its a solid state resistor. Meaning it's one of the most robust components under the hood, the only times I've seen them replaced was because the owner or mechanic erroneously thought it was the issue only to find out it wasn't.

Overvoltage and Overcurrent will damage or destroy the resistor, but if that is happening then you have other major issues.
 
Are you talking about the fuel pump relay under the hood?

IIRC, that relay controls an integral resistor that reduces fuel pump voltage based on throttle position and rpm. If deleted, the pump will run full speed all the time. The excess fuel is routed back to the tank via the pressure regulator. So the engine will run, but the life of the pump is shortened.

I have heard of this component failing on high-mileage cruisers, but it was the relay contacts that were the weak link, not the resistor itself. The delete was considered a limp-home option only.

Hope that helps?
 
Are you talking about the fuel pump relay under the hood?

IIRC, that relay controls an integral resistor that reduces fuel pump voltage based on throttle position and rpm. If deleted, the pump will run full speed all the time. The excess fuel is routed back to the tank via the pressure regulator. So the engine will run, but the life of the pump is shortened.

I have heard of this component failing on high-mileage cruisers, but it was the relay contacts that were the weak link, not the resistor itself. The delete was considered a limp-home option only.

Hope that helps?
Ok yea see on another thread they said they would bypass it perminatly. I was also wondering did my resistor blow because of my relay ?!? I don’t want to buy another resistor if my relay is bad. Today i took apart the relay and sanded down the points of contact so hopefully that helps
 
You should use Emory paper to clean the contacts. Sand paper uses chemicals in the glue which accelerate corrosion on electrical components
.
 
Denso fuel pump relays are only about $45. PN 567-0043

Circuit opening relay PN 567-0045
 
Ok yea see on another thread they said they would bypass it perminatly. I was also wondering did my resistor blow because of my relay ?!? I don’t want to buy another resistor if my relay is bad. Today i took apart the relay and sanded down the points of contact so hopefully that helps


Why are you convinced that your fuel pump resistor is the culprit? Because of the way it looked? Or have you actually tested it?
 
Fried wire. That sucks.
? If this resistor was to fail, would fail open?As in no resistance so pump would just run but at full go?
 
OKAY when you have your next issue let me know I’ll be sure to consider helping you

If you would have preformed the test outlined in the FSM you would have easily seen it as the culprit. I’m not convinced it is though. So good luck
 
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Fried wire. That sucks.
? If this resistor was to fail, would fail open?As in no resistance so pump would just run but at full go?

Normally a failed resistor fails open, meaning no current to the pump. It’s very odd that the wires “fried”. That should never happen if the correct fuses are used. Which makes me think they weren’t and that makes me wonder why.

It could be the resistor was going bad. But it’s more likely pointing to an issue with the fuel pump or pump wiring which isn’t rare. I would guess the fuse kept blowing so Mario put bigger fuses in which may have worked for a while, this allowed more current in the circuit than it was designed for.

Over current creates heat in the wire resulting in damage to the circuit. Aka fried wires.

Remember fuses are designed to protect the wires not the devices. People cause vehicle fires all the time because they jam larger amp fuses in rather than troubleshooting.
 
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