fj60 4sp transfer case was too full (1 Viewer)

hward1

87 fj60 / 95 fjz80
Joined
Feb 10, 2011
Messages
988
Location
CA for little while
 
today when i checked the fluid in the transfer case oil out comes a lot of oil at the fill plug area -- like pouring out -- what is wrong --- also leaking bad around the flange i guess its called (front of rear drive shaft) what will i need to fix this
 

BG_TX

SILVER Star
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Apr 15, 2007
Messages
888
Location
Tejas
 
 
The seal between the transmission and the transfer is shot, more info here...
 

2mbb

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Sep 1, 2003
Messages
5,016
Location
WC, CA
 
 
 
if the leak is going from the transfer case up into the transmission, then a temporary fix is to install a bypass hose. Man-a-Fre sells a kit, or you can put the parts together yourself--there is a thread someplace that has part numbers, etc. If the leak is going the other way, or if you want to fix the leak, then you need to replace the seal between the transfer can transmission, which means completely disassembling the transfer case. This is a lot more work and money (all new gaskets, seals, and you might as well check or replace transfer bearings while you are in there.

The leaking rear output seal can be replaced on the truck. Remove the drive shaft. The companion flange is held onto the transfer case with a stake nut. remove the nut, and the flange comes out giving access to the seal. This is not too difficult a job.
 

rusty_tlc

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Jun 23, 2005
Messages
13,926
Location
Reno, NV
 
 
 
If you have the ability to tap few threads you can take a couple of filler plugs two 90 deg fittings and a couple of hose barbs and make a bypass. It cost about $10.

If the splines are worn replacing the seals won't solve the problem.
 

orangefj45

Supporting Vendor
Joined
Mar 14, 2003
Messages
17,278
Location
norcal
 
 
 
the bypass hose is a band-aide but it does the job.


if the t-case has a lot of miles on it, then you might want to consider replacing the seals and or rebuilding it. usually that's not necessary unless you have 150k plus miles on the ticker.


georg
 

hward1

87 fj60 / 95 fjz80
Joined
Feb 10, 2011
Messages
988
Location
CA for little while
 
the truck has 166000 on it - i guess i should rebuild it and at that time do you rebuild the 4sp trans - thanks again
 

fred

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Aug 9, 2010
Messages
114
Location
Eugene, OR
Hward1,

Shortly after I bought my cruiser last summer, I discovered the T-case was leaking like a sieve.
I did the T-case rebuild with it IN the truck.

As for whether to rebuild the tranny as well - since you don't NEED to pul the tranny to rebuild the t-case, I wouldn't touch it if it appears to be workign fien and the clutch is working fine.
You might have a tranny guy drive it and listen to it to get another opinion. I did my t-case rebuild at 175K. At some poitn in the future, I am sure that I will have to replace the clutch. That seems like a good time to rebuild or replace the transmission.
Or when you do an engine rebuild...

The previous owner had already added the "return hose" from the T-case to the tranny. But the seals and gaskets were all almost three decades old (1982 FJ60).

Get the T-case rebuild kit from Kurt at Cruiser Outfitters (make sure you pick one that matches the year and T-case that you have!) for $225. Get the correct gear oil.

Apart from appropriate wrenches, the only thing that can be handy for disassembly is a gear puller, to get some stuff off the transmission output shaft. A soft mallet and some large sockets are sufficent for replacing these items.

For the T-case output shafts, you could probably remove the items that need to come off with a gear puller, and probably replace them with various tubes/sockets and a mallet, but access to a hydraulic press certainly simplifies life. I actually had all the pressing done at a local driveline shop. Well worth paying for a half hour to hour of mechanic time. But odds are you know someone with a press.

As for manuals, the process in the downloadable copy of the chassis and body manual (1984) is invaluable, and the printout fo the relevant pages was with me every step of the way. However, I also found that the images in the older Haynes manual (for FJ40s and the early FJ60's) was also very helpful.

The only tricky parts of the process are these 5 or 6:

1. When disassembling, be VERY careful when removing the aluminum rear housing. While it IS possible to slide it off by itself, it is probably NOT going to happen that way. It is pretty easy for the idler shaft and it's extremely heavy double gear to come off with the case, and then slide out of the case. If you are doing this with the truck on jackstands, having a hunk of steel that large landing on your head or hands is NOT goign to make your day.
And if the universe is feeling puckish, it will then land on something and chip the gear.

2. When pulling gears and bearings off of the transmission output shaft, be sure to either remember to try and catch the locking ball for the innermost sleeve when you remove the sleeve, or have the foresight to place a bucket beneath that point in the T-case to catch any residual oil that continues to drain. This will save your bacon when you DO slide off the sleeve on the output shaft.

There is a groove on the shaft, and on the inside of the sleeve.
A medium sized ballbearing sits there, to ensure that the sleeve stays locked to the shaft and spins along with the shaft. Unless you have accidentally managed to have the tranny oriented such that the ballbearing and slot are on the top of the shaft, this ball WILL fall out when you pull the sleeve off. Don't lose it!
And when you do the reassembly,you will beable to rotate the shaft so that the slot in ON TOP, and you can place the ball in there before sliding the sleeve back on. This sleeve, BTW, sits inside the tranny to t-case seal.

3. Removal of the pilot bearing in the rear of the front output shaft. This was a serious PITA, and ended up being ripped out in pieces. I suspect that there is some nice Toyota custom tools for removing this. Just be careful not to do any damage to the shaft and the bearing seat.
Also, getting the seal out of the inside of the speedometer gear housing can be pesky. It tends to break, rather than come out intact.

4. When reassembling, nothing is more annoying than to get all the shafts, bearings, races, and gears in place, get the cover on successfully, without dislodging anything, bolt it up, and roll over to discover that one of the thrust washers from the idler shaft is still sitting on the ground next to you. Very easy to forget.

5. Lining up the linkage lever for high-low gear.
I didn't find this to be a problem, but it seems to be for a lot of folks doing this rebuild. here's a link to a discussion, and my directions:
https://forum.ih8mud.com/60-series-wagons/423802-real-time-transfer-help.html

6. Front output shaft - because of it's location, this has a couple of gotchas. When attempting to unbolt the front drive shaft from the flange, the U-joint makes it difficult to access the nuts. Feel along the bottom of the large bracket that runs beneath the flange,and you wil find a slot in the bottom center that some genius at Toyota had punched so that you can get a wrench in there!
Later, on reassembly, this location will again become an issue.
The flange assemblies are attached to the output shafts with a "staked" nut, at a particular torque value. The stakenut is a relatively soft nut, with a collar that extends above. The shaft has a pair of large grooves in it. Once tightened to the correct value, you need to "Stake" the nut - basically use a chisel and hammer to drive a point or strip of the soft metal collar into those grooves. This is to prevent the nut from loosening. While relatively easy to do on the rear shafts, on the front shaft, supported on jackstands, there is not very much room to swing a hammer and hold a chisel.
I am a big guy, and with a 40 oz machinists hammer I was not able to get even swing to stake the nut. I resorted to driving the truck, with the front drive shaft still out, to my usual oilchange shop and schmoozing them into letting me pop into their pit and take two quick shots with the hammer and chisel to stake the front output shaft nut. Went home and put the riveshaft back in.
Last step of th process.

Other issues: The measuring pre-load step is pesky, in part because it is hard to find the correct instrument to measure this. I tried a bunch of auto parts stores without success. One option, descirbed in seveal threads, is using a fishing scale for this. I improvised by using an inch-lb. torque wrench, the old school kind with the arc and moving arrow (not the click kind) to get the pre-load in what seems to be the correct ballpark.

Hope this helps!
 

hward1

87 fj60 / 95 fjz80
Joined
Feb 10, 2011
Messages
988
Location
CA for little while
 
Hward1,

Shortly after I bought my cruiser last summer, I discovered the T-case was leaking like a sieve.
I did the T-case rebuild with it IN the truck.

As for whether to rebuild the tranny as well - since you don't NEED to pul the tranny to rebuild the t-case, I wouldn't touch it if it appears to be workign fien and the clutch is working fine.
You might have a tranny guy drive it and listen to it to get another opinion. I did my t-case rebuild at 175K. At some poitn in the future, I am sure that I will have to replace the clutch. That seems like a good time to rebuild or replace the transmission.
Or when you do an engine rebuild...

The previous owner had already added the "return hose" from the T-case to the tranny. But the seals and gaskets were all almost three decades old (1982 FJ60).

Get the T-case rebuild kit from Kurt at Cruiser Outfitters (make sure you pick one that matches the year and T-case that you have!) for $225. Get the correct gear oil.

Apart from appropriate wrenches, the only thing that can be handy for disassembly is a gear puller, to get some stuff off the transmission output shaft. A soft mallet and some large sockets are sufficent for replacing these items.

For the T-case output shafts, you could probably remove the items that need to come off with a gear puller, and probably replace them with various tubes/sockets and a mallet, but access to a hydraulic press certainly simplifies life. I actually had all the pressing done at a local driveline shop. Well worth paying for a half hour to hour of mechanic time. But odds are you know someone with a press.

As for manuals, the process in the downloadable copy of the chassis and body manual (1984) is invaluable, and the printout fo the relevant pages was with me every step of the way. However, I also found that the images in the older Haynes manual (for FJ40s and the early FJ60's) was also very helpful.

The only tricky parts of the process are these 5 or 6:

1. When disassembling, be VERY careful when removing the aluminum rear housing. While it IS possible to slide it off by itself, it is probably NOT going to happen that way. It is pretty easy for the idler shaft and it's extremely heavy double gear to come off with the case, and then slide out of the case. If you are doing this with the truck on jackstands, having a hunk of steel that large landing on your head or hands is NOT goign to make your day.
And if the universe is feeling puckish, it will then land on something and chip the gear.

2. When pulling gears and bearings off of the transmission output shaft, be sure to either remember to try and catch the locking ball for the innermost sleeve when you remove the sleeve, or have the foresight to place a bucket beneath that point in the T-case to catch any residual oil that continues to drain. This will save your bacon when you DO slide off the sleeve on the output shaft.

There is a groove on the shaft, and on the inside of the sleeve.
A medium sized ballbearing sits there, to ensure that the sleeve stays locked to the shaft and spins along with the shaft. Unless you have accidentally managed to have the tranny oriented such that the ballbearing and slot are on the top of the shaft, this ball WILL fall out when you pull the sleeve off. Don't lose it!
And when you do the reassembly,you will beable to rotate the shaft so that the slot in ON TOP, and you can place the ball in there before sliding the sleeve back on. This sleeve, BTW, sits inside the tranny to t-case seal.

3. Removal of the pilot bearing in the rear of the front output shaft. This was a serious PITA, and ended up being ripped out in pieces. I suspect that there is some nice Toyota custom tools for removing this. Just be careful not to do any damage to the shaft and the bearing seat.
Also, getting the seal out of the inside of the speedometer gear housing can be pesky. It tends to break, rather than come out intact.

4. When reassembling, nothing is more annoying than to get all the shafts, bearings, races, and gears in place, get the cover on successfully, without dislodging anything, bolt it up, and roll over to discover that one of the thrust washers from the idler shaft is still sitting on the ground next to you. Very easy to forget.

5. Lining up the linkage lever for high-low gear.
I didn't find this to be a problem, but it seems to be for a lot of folks doing this rebuild. here's a link to a discussion, and my directions:
https://forum.ih8mud.com/60-series-wagons/423802-real-time-transfer-help.html

6. Front output shaft - because of it's location, this has a couple of gotchas. When attempting to unbolt the front drive shaft from the flange, the U-joint makes it difficult to access the nuts. Feel along the bottom of the large bracket that runs beneath the flange,and you wil find a slot in the bottom center that some genius at Toyota had punched so that you can get a wrench in there!
Later, on reassembly, this location will again become an issue.
The flange assemblies are attached to the output shafts with a "staked" nut, at a particular torque value. The stakenut is a relatively soft nut, with a collar that extends above. The shaft has a pair of large grooves in it. Once tightened to the correct value, you need to "Stake" the nut - basically use a chisel and hammer to drive a point or strip of the soft metal collar into those grooves. This is to prevent the nut from loosening. While relatively easy to do on the rear shafts, on the front shaft, supported on jackstands, there is not very much room to swing a hammer and hold a chisel.
I am a big guy, and with a 40 oz machinists hammer I was not able to get even swing to stake the nut. I resorted to driving the truck, with the front drive shaft still out, to my usual oilchange shop and schmoozing them into letting me pop into their pit and take two quick shots with the hammer and chisel to stake the front output shaft nut. Went home and put the riveshaft back in.
Last step of th process.

Other issues: The measuring pre-load step is pesky, in part because it is hard to find the correct instrument to measure this. I tried a bunch of auto parts stores without success. One option, descirbed in seveal threads, is using a fishing scale for this. I improvised by using an inch-lb. torque wrench, the old school kind with the arc and moving arrow (not the click kind) to get the pre-load in what seems to be the correct ballpark.

Hope this helps!
thank you so much - i know this took time to explain -- i will get at it and let everyone know how it turns out -- thanks again - Heath
 

hward1

87 fj60 / 95 fjz80
Joined
Feb 10, 2011
Messages
988
Location
CA for little while
 
2. When pulling gears and bearings off of the transmission output shaft, be sure to either remember to try and catch the locking ball for the innermost sleeve when you remove the sleeve, or have the foresight to place a bucket beneath that point in the T-case to catch any residual oil that continues to drain. This will save your bacon when you DO slide off the sleeve on the output shaft


i pulled my gear off and dont think i had a ball holding it
 

hward1

87 fj60 / 95 fjz80
Joined
Feb 10, 2011
Messages
988
Location
CA for little while
 
how do you remove the front output shaft with the front transfer case off so i can replace the bearing
 

hward1

87 fj60 / 95 fjz80
Joined
Feb 10, 2011
Messages
988
Location
CA for little while
 
2. When pulling gears and bearings off of the transmission output shaft, be sure to either remember to try and catch the locking ball for the innermost sleeve when you remove the sleeve, or have the foresight to place a bucket beneath that point in the T-case to catch any residual oil that continues to drain. This will save your bacon when you DO slide off the sleeve on the output shaft


i pulled my gear off and dont think i had a ball holding it
never mind i did was thinking of different part
 

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