Controlling off-roading

spressomon

glutton
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Might want to read this:

http://news.rgj.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051103/NEWS10/511030347

Government funded Clear Cutting and Mining, that leave scars upon our land for centuries, is OK but off-roading for pleasure/leisure is apparently not to be tolerated by idiots in Washington. Our government, in my opinion, has gotten way, way too big, powerful and too selective in who they control.
 

alvarorb

Color Geek in Charge
 
 
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Could it have something to do with the fact that the lobbist for lumber far exceed the lobbist for recreational access?

It's all about the money

Regards

Alvaro
 

spressomon

glutton
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Exactly! Or maybe if we dump millions of gallons of Arsenic, Mercury, radioactive toxins into the rivers, streams and aquifers (as long as it is on federal property) they would leave us alone...effing government! :mad:
 

Niner

 
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Readfield, WI
Before you bash the GOV to much read yesterdays forest service news release.

USDA FOREST SERVICE NEWS RELEASE

EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE UNTIL 1 P.M., EST

Release No. FS-0605

Contact: Press Office, (202) 205-1134

USDA FOREST SERVICE RELEASES FINAL RULE FOR MOTORIZED RECREATION IN
NATIONAL FORESTS & GRASSLANDS
New Rule will Balance Best Possible Care of Land with Public's
Enjoyment of Recreational Vehicles through Local Collaboration

WASHINGTON, Nov. 2, 2005 - U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service today announced a new regulation for recreational motor vehicle use in national forests and grasslands which will forge a sustainable system of routes and areas designated for motorized use in the future.

"OHV and other motorized vehicles are fun and exciting ways to experience national forests and we've seen dramatic increases in their popularity in the last decade," said Forest Service Chief Dale Bosworth. "Land managers will use the new rule to continue to work with motorized sports enthusiasts, conservationists, state and local officials and others to provide responsible motorized recreational experiences in national forests and grasslands for the long run."

The new travel management policy requires each national forest and grassland to identify and designate those roads, trails and areas that are open to motor vehicle use. Local units will seek public input and coordinate with federal, state, county and other local governmental entities as well as tribal governments before any decision is made on a
particular road, trail or area. Unplanned, user-created routes will be considered at the local level during the designation process.

The agency expects that it will take up to four years to
complete the designation process for all 155 national forests and 20 grasslands. Each unit will also publish a motor vehicle use map. The final rule addresses the more than 80,000 comments received on last year's proposed rule. Most comments strongly supported the concept of designating
routes and areas for motor vehicle use.

Once the designation process is complete, motor vehicle use off these routes and outside those areas (cross-country travel) will be prohibited. This prohibition will not affect over-snow vehicles, such as snowmobiles.

The rule will impact motor vehicle use on roads, trails and areas under Forest Service management. State, county or other public roads within national forest and grassland boundaries will not be included in the designation process.

Some national forests and grasslands already have established systems of roads, trails and areas designed and managed for motorized use. This rule does not require those units to change existing plans.

In 2002, the Forest Service had more than 214 million visits, with about the same number driving through just to enjoy the scenery. More than 200,000 miles of forest roads are currently open to off-highway vehicle (OHV) use as well as more than 36,000 miles of trails. In addition, national forest recreation has become the biggest contributor to many
local economies, including rural communities.

Recreational motor vehicles include OHVs, all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), off-highway motorcycles (OHMs) and off-road vehicles (ORVs), such as 4-by-4 trucks or Jeeps.

A copy of the new rule can be found at www.fs.fed.us
 

spressomon

glutton
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"Once the designation process is complete, motor vehicle use off these routes and outside those areas (cross-country travel) will be prohibited. This prohibition will not affect over-snow vehicles, such as snowmobiles."

Essentially if I am travelling off-road and want to drive across sage brush to get at a place to camp...judging by the above statement...I won't be able to!

They are still trying to clamp down on the folks that cause the least amount of damage...IMO. In Nevada & Oregon (and probably other Western states) the public lands (BLM, USFF) has been nuked, ripped, mined, scarred, polluted, over-grazed, raped, etc...but nothing is done to the perpetrators. In fact if you completely destroy a mountain to get at a little gold ore, uranium, copper, etc., and then file bankruptcy you basically escape all the federally mandated reclamation laws.

Another way the burrocraps have fast forwarded effectively fencing off the land for anyone not on foot or hoof is by placing these lands under "Wilderness Study"...which outlaws any motorized vehicle use in those areas. In Nevada they (the burrocraps) have already roped off thousands and thousands of acres with their "Wilderness Study" program. This program, of course, is a whole lot less time and energy consuming regarding the process than a full blown Wilderness Designation.

Don't get me wrong: I am in favor of Wilderness Areas and overall protection of lands. But I wish the government(s) would go after the corporations that REALLY impact the land, water, air...rather than clamping down on a few recreationalists that are out enjoying the great outdoors.
 
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