chev swap

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so I am almost finished my frame off resto and the my 76 2f motor turnes out to be pooched! the fuel pump diaphram broke and ran lots of gas into the oil and wrecked the mains ??? I was changing the oil and it pissed out probably 15 litres of gassy oil


350 time!

anyways when I bought all my parts from a guy to build my truck he gave me a lakewood bellhousing which is custom set up for a 350 to a toyota 4spd it also has the mount for hydraulic clutch slave and i have the crossmember for the t case. also I have the tranny and t case that was on the setup

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well what I need to find out is the clutch set up? throwout bearing? clutch fork and clutch pack? do chev trannies have the same input shaft spline count?? what about the pilot bearing on the end of the cranksaft will that need shims?

any info will be appreciated
 
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so does anyone know if a chevy clutch slides onto the splines on the toyota 4spd input shaft???

Is the input shaft retaning bearing the same size?
 
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depending on cost i would stay away from anything smaller the 350ci, if its free or close then why not run something smaller. if you are going to rebuild it then only 350 or bigger, just money well spent.

chevy clutch works, i imagine you will have to use chevy fork and a toy throwout, dont know for sure, i have that same bell setup but not installed in anything. pilot is something you will have to look at also.

It has been recommended not to use centerforce for any kind of hard wheelin, dont know thats what i heard.

below is for carb motors and very early TBI,
As far as difference between 350 truck v 350 car or truck v car v8 chevys are very little difference between them at all. Yes some heads are made for truck specific applications, they also use different acc. mounting. The earlier heads also have different acc. mounts then the later ones. Power difference there is none. Later motors use same heads, cams, internals between car and truck. THe main difference is how fresh the rebuild is :D :D

cam and intake, properly setup quad will make worlds of difference.

Car engine are generally worked less then the trucks.

there also is a 400ci, personal favorite :p

Damn if you were close i would give you a rebuildable core, or cheaply sell you a runner. I am sick of tripping over 10+ sbc engines holding down the floor.
 
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[quote author=HI^C link=board=1;threadid=5506;start=msg44819#msg44819 date=1064512846]It has been recommended not to use centerforce for any kind of hard wheelin, dont know thats what i heard.[/quote]
We have three SBC FJ40s. One with a centerforce and two using the chev clutch. The centerforce has outlived three chev clutches and has steadily out performed them. The chev clutch heats up and slips where the c-force just keeps going.
below is for carb motors and very early TBI,
As far as difference between 350 truck v 350 car or truck v car v8 chevys are very little difference between them at all. Yes some heads are made for truck specific applications, they also use different acc. mounting. The earlier heads also have different acc. mounts then the later ones. Power difference there is none. Later motors use same heads, cams, internals between car and truck. THe main difference is how fresh the rebuild is :D :D
As previously stated the SBC has an outstanding interchangability rate. There are, however, some major differences between the run of the mill car type engine and the truck and corvette engines. Trucks and vettes are the legendary four bolt main heavy duty block. Car motors aren't. As for the heads there are too many differences to list but generally they are interchangeable.
cam and intake, properly setup quad will make worlds of difference.
Yes, this is another reason to use a truck engine. They have a torque cam from the factory where the car has economy or highway travel cam installed.
Car engine are generally worked less then the trucks.
there also is a 400ci, personal favorite :p
Just so you'll know the 400 is a four bolt main truck engine. It also has siamesed cylinders and around 20% less cooling area. the shared area on the cylinder wall causes a hot spot which is the cause of most 400 piston related failures. The best combination for offroad applications is to use the crank assembly and rods from the 400 in the 350 block. This makes a "383 stroker" which is very well known for power and durability.
 
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Actually not all Van and Truck SBC's are 4 bolt main. I bought one out of a 3/4 ton 79 Van and it turned out to be a 2 bolt. The 4 bolt is the one you want for building a high horsepower motor but the 2 bolt is fine for a mild rv cam and a performance intake / exhaust type motor. After all , were not going circle track racing. ) The 383 is the best way to go "imo". but it will cost you a bit more to get the 400 crank.
 
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[quote author=hammerhead link=board=1;threadid=5506;start=msg44960#msg44960 date=1064533555]
There are, however, some major differences between the run of the mill car type engine and the truck and corvette engines. Trucks and vettes are the legendary four bolt main heavy duty block. Car motors aren't. As for the heads there are too many differences to list but generally they are interchangeable.Yes, this is another reason to use a truck engine. They have a torque cam from the factory where the car has economy or highway travel cam installed.Just so you'll know the 400 is a four bolt main truck engine. It also has siamesed cylinders and around 20% less cooling area. the shared area on the cylinder wall causes a hot spot which is the cause of most 400 piston related failures[/quote]

Not so. Small blocks of every description (4 bolt and 2 bolt) were used in GM cars and there are MANY 2 bolt 400's. GM was most influenced by emissions and the gas shortage in the 70's and 80's and made their cam choices more on those factors than truck or car. Also, the legendary overheating in the 400 had less to do with cooling area and more to do with people putting on heads that did not have steam holes drilled for the engine. In addition, most dyno research also shows that the stength difference between 2 and 4 bolt mains is almost non-existant under about 350 HP and even then provides little help. Keep the bottom end below 6000 RPM and your 2 bolt will hold together nicely and for a long time.
 
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Sorry boys, my chev book says nothing about the 2bolt 400. My mistake.

Let's stay true to the topic here though gentlemen. We're not talking circle track. We're not talking mud drags. We're talking about a good powerplant for a 4x4. The fact is that the Chev truck 350 is the most common (easily found in most every junkyard in the country), the cheapest (dime-a-dozen in most areas), and has the best low end power. More than enough to shread the stock drivetrain in an FJ. The car engine wasn't setup for pulling the loads. You can build any engine to be capable but the truck engine already is so why waste the money.

I'm running a truck 350, HEI, Q-jet. It will stay lit below 400 RPM on steep stuff. I have chugged it down as far as 250 RPM just going slow on smooth dirt. I've had many chevys in my lifetime and the only small blocks capable of this came from trucks.
 

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