C Channel Install

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate
links, including eBay, Amazon, Skimlinks, and others.

Joined
Apr 13, 2020
Threads
1
Messages
13
Location
23229
I have a few questions about installing my new C Channels. About a year ago I cleaned up the frame, cut, pried, beat and cussed the old C Channels supports out. I also removed the rear spring hanger bracket to get the C Channel out and bolted it back in place. At the time I was installing a new suspension and did not have the new C Channels to replace the old ones before putting the truck back together. Fast forward, I have the new supports and need to install them. I have use of a drive on lift that can lift the truck from the frame and hang the rear suspension and axle.

Option 1: Lift the truck up by frame taking all the weight off the tires, remove the Ubolts, drop the axle. Hook a small come-along to the leaf spring and hold the tension while removing the bolts in the spring hanger. (Or should I remove the leaf spring from the shackle and hanger). Install the C Channel with new hardware and put everything back together.

Option 2: Same as option 1 but leaving the Ubolts on, hooking up the come-along the same but only doing one side at a time..

I am looking for the safest method. Also if you have a better suggestion I am all ears as I am new to this.
IMG_0813 (1).jpg
 
I haven't done this job, but I don't understand why you wouldn't simply jack the car up, remove the upper shackle bolt and let the rear axle assembly rest on the floor while you bolt the c-channels in?
I think you are right. I have a hard time not overthinking something and just doing it. Thanks for the reply
 
I was wondering similar. I was going to jack the rear end up to where I think the springs have no tension. Then remove the rivets holding the spring hanger on. But I dont really know what that measurement is. I dont want the thing to let go all of a sudden as I remove the rivet. At least yours are bolted in now so you'll see them separate as you undo the bolt if theres tension.
 
Who made those channels and, approximately, what's the cost?
I had a friend make these from the old set I pulled out. He owns a fab shop that supports the tobacco business so they work primarily with stainless steel. My hope is that everything lines up when I go to install. The only place I am aware to purchase these from is Trail Tailor.
 
I'm a bit late to this party but did you ever get your new C channels installed?

I just want to see pictures of shiny new stainless C channels in the frame rails 😂
 
I'm a bit late to this party but did you ever get your new C channels installed?

I just want to see pictures of shiny new stainless C channels in the frame rails 😂
Sorry for the late reply. The job went better than I thought it was going to go. I had to notch out the forward end so that the sway bar brackets would fit. The C-Channels were thicker than the originals and the bolts on the sway bar brackets were not long enough.
IMG_4587.jpg
IMG_4873.jpg
IMG_4874.jpg
IMG_4875.jpg
 
Beautifully done. What's the paper you have between them and the original steel for?
I covered the C-Channel with a thin layer of Teflon tape (purchased from Amazon) to act as a barrier between the Stainless and the original frame steel (that had been painted a year ago). May have been overkill or maybe useless but I remembered reading about a barrier between dissimilar metals and thought "why not".
 
I covered the C-Channel with a thin layer of Teflon tape (purchased from Amazon) to act as a barrier between the Stainless and the original frame steel (that had been painted a year ago). May have been overkill or maybe useless but I remembered reading about a barrier between dissimilar metals and thought "why not".
With stainless on carbon steel you're alright. Combinations of aluminum, steel, magnesium, etc are where you'll start to get bimetallic corrosion. That said, the teflon tape sure ain't hurting anything so may as well leave it in 😂
 
With stainless on carbon steel you're alright. Combinations of aluminum, steel, magnesium, etc are where you'll start to get bimetallic corrosion. That said, the teflon tape sure ain't hurting anything so may as well leave it in 😂

WRONG... Stainless to carbon = galvanic corrosion. Teflon sheet is what I used to supply with my SS C-channel kits (with stainless hardware) before the price quadrupled in price and no one would buy them.

Using steel bolts on this application is still going to cause GC. As soon as the coating on the steel bolts scratches/touches the stainless and O2 hits it the reaction starts. This is why I only used stainless hardware. Stainless hardware reduces the chance of this over steel hardware in the long run.

Oilfield stanchion assembly for pipe. Stainless to Carbon.... teflon liners and stainless hardware. Spelled out in most engineering specs and ASME code books.


J
 
WRONG... Stainless to carbon = galvanic corrosion. Teflon sheet is what I used to supply with my SS C-channel kits (with stainless hardware) before the price quadrupled in price and no one would buy them.

Using steel bolts on this application is still going to cause GC. As soon as the coating on the steel bolts scratches/touches the stainless and O2 hits it the reaction starts. This is why I only used stainless hardware. Stainless hardware reduces the chance of this over steel hardware in the long run.

Oilfield stanchion assembly for pipe. Stainless to Carbon.... teflon liners and stainless hardware. Spelled out in most engineering specs and ASME code books.


J
I stand corrected. I was going off anecdotal experience with the times I've put stainless hardware on steel parts and not seen any signs of corrosion in years since, so figured stainless stock to mild/carbon stock would be the same. Thanks for the clarification.
 
I bought Jason's channels and hardware, including his rear bumper brace that he dug out from some secret stash. Grinded off surface rust of old frame and coated frame with Por15. Coated the new steel channels with Por15 top coat, then hit them with Eastwood chassis black. Layered on a film of SuperLube clear synthetic grease to the frame before bolting up the new channels. Should be good for a few years.

IMG_9573.JPG


70145548085__99E55093-8E8A-4BE3-A46A-8E98CD771A77 2.JPG


IMG_9577.JPG


IMG_9578.JPG


IMG_9588 2.JPG
 
WRONG... Stainless to carbon = galvanic corrosion. Teflon sheet is what I used to supply with my SS C-channel kits (with stainless hardware) before the price quadrupled in price and no one would buy them.

Using steel bolts on this application is still going to cause GC. As soon as the coating on the steel bolts scratches/touches the stainless and O2 hits it the reaction starts. This is why I only used stainless hardware. Stainless hardware reduces the chance of this over steel hardware in the long run.

Oilfield stanchion assembly for pipe. Stainless to Carbon.... teflon liners and stainless hardware. Spelled out in most engineering specs and ASME code books.


J
Thanks for the information. I'll switch out my hardware to Stainless.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Back
Top Bottom