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Brake pedal sticking

Discussion in '100-Series Cruisers' started by dnp, Aug 10, 2005.

  1. dnp

    dnp Supporting Vendor SILVER Star

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    Several times a day, the brake pedal on my 99 LX sort of sticks. Basically, it doesn't rebound immediately after being depressed.

    Do any of you know if this is a noted problem? Should the pedal pivot and linkages require lubrication or is this more likely sticking within the master cylinder? Anyone know if these master cylinders have experienced any problems?

    Any help would be appreciated, as this is an annoying issue.

    Thanks.
     
  2. chukiechz

    chukiechz

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    mine too, but no one's found the problem yet.
     
  3. dnp

    dnp Supporting Vendor SILVER Star

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    Anyone have any ideas? Any "common" problems known on the LX-style Master Cylinders or boosters? I need help, and I know the dealership's the worst place to look for it!

    Thanks
     
  4. ZJ2UZJ100

    ZJ2UZJ100

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    Mine too.

    Break pedal return spring? Master cylinder?
     
  5. drexx

    drexx

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    16Aug2005 (UTC +8)

    Since I don't think you see this issue as being critical, do the cheapest fixes first. Try lubricating moving parts first... but my first suspect is the spring itself. My HZJ-80 has a similar issue, but it's with the clutch pedal :)
     
  6. sethos1

    sethos1

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    I just picked up a 2000 LC 2 weeks ago and am having the same problem. Very interested to find out why. will look at the spring first.
     
  7. dnp

    dnp Supporting Vendor SILVER Star

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    The only thing about suspecting the spring is that it doesn't stick but about 50% of the time.......VERY irritating! It probably does it worst when pulling out of the driveway (backwards) in the morning. I plan to lubricate everything, then I plan to replace the brake fluid with new.....hopefully, it's just some trash in the Master Cyl. that flushing will remove.

    I know one thing: I haven't checked the price yet, but the combination
    master cyl./booster/reservoir set up on this LX looks DAMN expensive!!!

    I have to tell you that I'm a little surprised that I've had any trouble at all out of this vehicle. Past Toyota products have been virtually maintenance-free; however, 6 months ago I had to replace the starter, and now this......hope this will take care of things for a long time to come (one of my other cars scares the $*it out of me when I think about the cost of repairs....this one is nearly as bad!)
     
  8. sethos1

    sethos1

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    I had my wife take the truck in to the dealer that we bought from since it has a 30 day warrenty. I spoke with the head mechanic and he tells me this is "normal" for these brakes. yeah right.
    how lazy are these toyota dealers?
    So i plan on getting another opinion from a trusted independent.

    On a side note we had to take the truck to the used service department as they honor the warranty. My wife called this place a crack house. It was a mess. Did not even look like a repair shop.
    And this from a fairly large toyota dealership. Toyota of North hollywood.
    Dealer service at most places is pretty poor.
    Any one know of a good dealer service dept in Los Angeles?

    Will try to get to the bottom of the brake issue.
     
  9. sethos1

    sethos1

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    Update

    I had all 4 disc rotors replaced as 2 were below spec. the sticking problem has gotten better but not gone completely. The pedal does not stick as hard and not as often. I am going on some road trips over the holidays and want to put some miles on the truck. We will see what happens.
     
  10. Jim_Chow

    Jim_Chow

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    I've had good results from having two alignments (once after changing t-bars, another after regearing the front diff & pulling the IFS crossmember, plus a fuel filter change) at South Bay Toyota on Western Ave just north of the 405. They're right down the street from Toyota USA.

    --Jim
     
  11. sethos1

    sethos1

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    Thanks for the tip Jim!
     
  12. Jim_Chow

    Jim_Chow

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    Sure. After I had the front diff on my mini regeared (pulled the IFS crossmember on one side), the mechanic called me into the back and told me that "for some strange reason, one side was correct while the other side was off." That's because the side that was off was the side where we pulled the crossmember. Anyways, he was saavy enough to figure this out w/o me telling them anything beforehand. BTW, they will install aftermarket parts (there's a Earl's on Hawthorne just north of the 405 where I had custom hoses w/ stainless ends made)

    The independent I go to for stuff like belts/tune-ups, etc. is Fenton's in Redondo Beach/Lawndale (right across from the 4Wheel parts on Marine, IIRC). They did a timing chain change on my 86, installed a new TRD cam, replaced rocker arms, new valve seals, exhaust guides, new HG for $880 labor (I bought the OEM parts from a Toyota dealer via the internet). The owner (Craig Fenton) is a tinkerer, used to drive a mini 4wd he rescued from a swamp and rebuilt, but now drives a LS400 w/ 1UZ.
     
  13. CarbonCruiser

    CarbonCruiser

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    Did anyone find a solution to the brake pedal that sticks? My 2001 has this issue. It feels as though the pedal gets held up on an uneven surface and then slips over the obstruction.
     
  14. k1elliott

    k1elliott

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    Hi All,

    My first contribution.

    My year 2000 100 series had the same sticking brake pedal problem up until yesterday.

    Over the weekend I overhauled the front calipers with genuine Toyota cylinder kits and the problem is resolved. Also, the resevoir had been over filled.

    I had previously bled the system to no avail.

    Hope this helps.

    Kind Regards.
     
  15. NMuzj100

    NMuzj100

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    A front caliper overhaul write up would make a nice second contribution!

    Welcome!
     
  16. k1elliott

    k1elliott

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    Here you go. I haven't reviewed it yet. TV calls.

    - Time = 60 mins per caliper depending on state of repair
    - you'll need original Toyota cylinder kit, sponge with soft scrubbing back, soft cloth, some cocktail sticks, block of wood about 30mm thick and standard tools
    - prepare a work surface with plenty of news paper
    - Apply parking brake and Loosen wheel nuts
    - Jack up at lower control arm
    - Remove wheel
    - Clamp the brake hose with brakeline clamp
    - Remove the union bolt and 2 gaskets from the caliper,then disconnect the flexible hose from the caliper. Place your bucket under the caliper to catch spilled fluid.
    - Remove the 2 mounting bolts (17 mm I think) and remove the caliper - make sure you have a good hold of it as its heavy
    - Take the caliper to your work area
    - Remove the clip (keep) from the end of the guide pins then pull the pins out of the caliper (keep)
    - Remove the spring that the guide pins passes through (keep)
    - Remove the pads and shims etc. Mine were all stuck together so pretty easy. They're a tight fit though (keep if not replacing pads)
    - Try to drain as much fluid out of the caliper as possible via the hose connection (the next bit vapourises the fluid which you don't want to breath in)
    - Remove the 'set rings' (circular steel rings around the dust boot/seal with a screw driver (discard)
    - Pull off the dust boot and discard
    - Place the wood between the pistons. The idea is to allow the pistons to be pushed out without coming out altogether.
    - using compressed air, apply air pressure to the hose connection hole in the caliper. Be careful here, the one with least friction will fly out. You're trying to get them all out a certain distance while keeping them in their bores so that pressure doesn't escape. Therefore the thickness of the wood is key to this step. I used 3 pieces about 1cm thick, blew air in, then took 1 piece out and
    blew again. Do this bit outdoors and wear a face mask. (If you dont have air you can reapply the brake line but that's difficult on your own)
    - I couldn't get 2 pistons out the rest of the way. I don't have a specific tool for this so I used a screw driver levering with a piece of wood in the centre of the caliper face against the groove where the dust boot sits into the caliper. At the same time, I used a second screw driver on the other side of the piston levering againt the caliper wall and the same groove. This provides force on both sides ensuring the piston doesn't sieze.
    - You should have them all out. Be careful with them and DONT drop one or score the machined surface. Be likewise careful with the machined surface inside the bores.
    - Now remove the piston seals from the calipers. I used a cocktail stick to prize it away from the groove then used a very small flat head screw driver to remove it. The sticks weren't strong enough
    to remove the ring completely. Be very careful that the screw driver blade doesn't damage the machined surface. (discard)
    - Now you have dirty pistons and a bare caliper. My calipers had rust damage under the boots so I decided to get a wire brush attachment on a drill and clean the surfaces around where the boots sit. Again be careful with the inner bore surfaces.
    - I then got my air line and blew out the small holes between each bore and the caliper as a whole (doing the internals last).
    - I cut a small piece from the back of a sponge and lightly cleaned the rust from inside the top of the bores where the boots had failed.
    - I placed the pistons in soapy water and with 3 fingers holding the inside of a piston, I lightly cleaned the pistons with the back of a sponge. This did a nice job of bringing the pistons to a mirror surface. Dry them carefully with a soft cloth. One of my old t-shirts was nominated.
    - Open your cylinder kit. You'll have new seals, boots, ring clips, gaskets, bleeder covers and grease. you'll notice that on each side of the caliper, theres a large piston and a smaller. Seperate out 2 large seals, clips and boots and 2 small of each.
    - Grease a dust boot and place it over the piston so that it sits into the groove and can travel down the piston. I noticed that the boot sometimes didn't sit properly into the groove. If you pull the boot down over the piston after you fit it, it will twist and sit in properly.
    - grease up a seal and place it in the groove in the bore
    - grease the piston and carefully place the piston into the bore and push it down all the way into the bore. It get's tight as it hits the seal but keep pushing. Be sure to push evenly on the surface as it will get stuck if you don't.
    - push the boot over its housing (the lip around the top of the bore). it should sit neatly and easily.
    - now apply the circlular 'set ring'. Make sure you get the right size. TIP!! Open the clip and let the 2 ends join together !! Then its almost opened to the size of the boot. Place it over the top of the bore and stretch it out to fit. Let it close over the boot. Check it by applying a small amount of upward pressure with your finger. If it pops then its not seated properly.
    - Repeat for remaining pistons.
    - Insert pads with copper grease on rear (not disc side), reinsert spring, insert cleaned and greased guide pins and clip
    - Bolt the caliper onto the axle (90 foot lb)
    - remove the gaskets from the union bot if they are stuck to it. clean the bolt. using 2 new gaskets reapply the union bolt. (22 ft lb)
    - remove hose clamp
    - bleed - don't forget to fill resevoir. apply new bleed cover.
    - done

    K
     
  17. NMuzj100

    NMuzj100

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    Haven't even read it all yet but I'd call that the new standard for a second post ....






    ... but where are the pictures?
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2009
  18. mmaakk

    mmaakk

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    My brakes were sticking recently and when I checked my rear and front breaks everything looked good. Went a step further and took off tires and on closer inspection the rear driver side inner pad had about 1/8" while the exterior pad had about a 1/2"; talk about sticking! cleaned everything up and installed new pads and its much better now; curious to see if the next set of pads will wear the same.
    Warning! give all your inner pads a visual inspection!
     
  19. Desert Dog

    Desert Dog

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  20. Desert Dog

    Desert Dog

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    I have the same brake drag problem with my 2000 100 Series LandCruiser. I was thrilled to see your post that seems that it could the solution. Did your brake pedal fail to come all the way up immediately after taking your foot off the pedal? Or did the brake drag even though the pedal came up all the way? I can lift the pedal up (maybe 3/4 to 1 inch) with the tip of my foot and the brake stops dragging. If the caliper is not returning, I can see that you would have the brake dragging problem and your solution would fix it. But it seems to me that the pedal would return all the way even though the caliper does not release fully. My question to you is did your pedal fail to come all the way up before you rebuilt the calipers?