benefits of cent diff lock switch?

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9780

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Nov 10, 2003
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hey all :flipoff2: I am debating the merits of adding the cent diff lock switch to my 97 lx 450.
Is it correct that in H mode with unlocked center diff about 70% power to rear , 30% to front?
Then with the cent diff lock switch I can lock the cent diff in H mode giving me what kind of power? is it a 50/50 split.
I believe I understand the benefit of having the center diff unlocked in Low mode ( being able to turn tighter with less binding)
In what kind of driving conditions has anyone found this useful?
How do you think H mode with cent diff locked would perform in snow? On ice?

I hope I am not beating a dead horse here as you all have probably discussed this to death but I havent found any posts specific to winter driving.

Thanks :beer:
 
ppc

ppc

M Go Blue
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Locking the center on ice and snow as well as other slippery surfaces can be beneficial in most conditions but certainly not all circumstances. It avoids the constant shifting of power front to back when traction is lost on one wheel but it could cause a sudden shift of direction when one axle gains traction suddenly. Coupled with the fact the center lock disables ABS one can get into a bad predicament very fast. When locked there is a 50/50 distribution front to back. The 30/70 figure as well as others I’ve seen in the past but no one has given and reputable source for that information.
 
scottm

scottm

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I used to do a lot of trailering to & through construction sites. Unlocked low is really nice for maneuvering a trailer in rough ground. In deep stuff I stayed unlocked, but kept the diff switch set for rear locked, and my finger near the cdl switch. On real slick roads I sometimes had to lock up to get up a hill with the trailer, high range limited overall torque for less unintentional spinning.
 
Jim_Chow

Jim_Chow

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If it helps, the UN/NATO 105s, some overseas 80s, the 78s, and workhorse older hilux's are part-time 4WD, meaning that if you're in 4WD, the center diff is locked all the time ('cause there is no center diff!). I've driven on a number of icy roads around Mt Rainier (winter) in 4WD (part time, so no center diff) with no issues. But I don't recommend driving on high-traction surfaces (like dry pavement) w/ the center locked...it binds up the drivetrain...not good on the t-case...something has to give, and that typically means breakage though I've never had anything break (there's a lot of overbuild in Toyotas).

Since the 100 series has a center diff lock switch that operates in both hi/lo, and since most 100s are mall/soccer-mom cruisers who might inadvertently push the switch and drive around for week/months like that, my guess is Toyota engineers have figured a certain amount of overbuild into the design so the t-case won't disintegrate in the first 25mph turn on dry pavement.
 

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