Any one sleeve a 1fz block? Cylinder 1 damage

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My 97 LX450 (250k)overheated on the coldest morning this past February. Maybe a stuck thermostat? Fan clutch? I don't know. Started later that afternoon and steam was coming out at every joint in the exhaust and I got a misfire code. I did not drive it again. A few weeks later I pulled the head off and it was clearly blown. Piston #6 was shiny while the rest were covered in carbon. There was also a good bit of antifreeze that came out of the oil pan. My plan was a complete reseal and valve job until I was checking the cylinder bores. At the top front of cylinder #1. Starting about 3/8" down from where that rings stop you could feel where the ring had dug into the cylinder so that it got uniformly deeper as it got closer to the top of the stroke. Anyway, I pulled the engine block and transmission/transfer case. I purchased oem 50 over pistons and rings and took it to the machine shop to be bored. So my choice now is to spend money I don't have and reorder 100 over pistons and rings and or (if he can find one) let him bore the cylinder and sleeve it.
I have not found anyone in my area that is familiar with our vehicles (machinist included), but he says that he has seen this problem in quite a few domestic inline sixes that have the water pump up front. Has any one else seen this or had success sleeving the block? The rest of the cylinders looked and measured great. Also all the rod and main bearings looked great and measured out to .0015 oil clearance with plastigage. The coolant passages in the block were very clean, as was the oil cooler. The PO replaced the pesky heater hose and radiator after that hose blew. I have had it for 5yrs 30k and that was done at least a year before I purchased it.
 
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It's not clear why you need to sleeve a cylinder?? The original block has enough "meat" to bore it out then install the larger pistons. Did the machinist say it was beyond the spec to be bored out?
 
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It's not clear why you need to sleeve a cylinder?? The original block has enough "meat" to bore it out then install the larger pistons. Did the machinist say it was beyond the spec to be bored out?
He bought 50 over pistons, but now needs to either buy 100 over, or bore and sleeve. He’s trying to avoid buying the new pistons. That’s how I read the post.
 
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bhsdriller: any idea where is Mechanic Jack's shop located, looks like Asia but which country? He would do well to open a chain of shops in the US (using his mechanics).
 
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PIP

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A good, experienced engine builder should have no problem whatsoever sleeving a single hole in a cast iron block.

If this shop does not feel comfortable sleeving it, I suggest finding a shop that knows what they're doing.
 
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So while this machinist is not familiar with import engines, he is experienced with sleeving diesels and other domestic stuff. If he can source a sleeve that is the right size I am leaning that way since it would also allow another rebuild/re-bore in the future. plus the cost is a good bit less to sleeve than to buy another set of pistons and rings, even at partsouq prices.
 

PIP

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So while this machinist is not familiar with import engines, he is experienced with sleeving diesels and other domestic stuff. If he can source a sleeve that is the right size I am leaning that way since it would also allow another rebuild/re-bore in the future. plus the cost is a good bit less to sleeve than to buy another set of pistons and rings, even at partsouq prices.

The rules for thickness, fits, step size and location are exactly the same for any iron block sleeve. If he doesn't understand that I'd question his abilities. It is not engine dependent. Sleeving gets tricky when the block integrity is compromised such as when a cylinder is cracked or a rod has chunked off the bottom of cylinder. In those situations you need a skilled machinist more than an engine rebuilder.

You don't source a sleeve in the right size. There are companies that all they do is centrifugally cast iron sleeves for IC engine cylinders. You call them up and order exactly what you need. Some engines have "repair sleeves" that are sold by the OEM to sleeve a hole back to standard. You aren't sleeving back to standard so that's not a thing for you and I doubt Toyota makes them for a 1FZ.

Also, just wanted to note that the video posted above is some serious hack work. That is not a quality rebuild. When they are installing sleeves with a wood block that is wrong. There's no way they have adequate fit sizing if they are tapping a sleeve home with a wood block by hand. No way in hell.
 
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He mentioned checking with melling. They have a catalog of commonly used sizes in addition to making custom sizes like was mentioned. From a time and cost basis he was hoping to find something in the catalog that was also easily available through his suppliers. I talked to him today and he did and it is on the way. It should be in and block ready next week. I am still curious if anyone else has had this issue with a 1fz. The issue being the ring digging into the bore at the top front of #1.
 
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Lexcruier said: "I am still curious if anyone else has had this issue with a 1fz.
--- the ring(s) digging into the bore(s) at the top--- of a cylinder".



Yes, but haven't been able to measure the amount. Found the wear at 3 and 9 O'clock about 1/2" below the deck ie: side-to-side as the piston comes up and starts back down (from the piston rocking in the bore ?? AFAIK). Found that on all six cylinders in an engine with almost 300,000 miles. There is a spec for that, don't have it in front of me. That engine also needs one cylinder to be sleeved and the rest may need to be bored out but the cost of a complete rebuild of that block comes to about 2/3 the cost of a new short block, so IDK.

It would help if you can document the process the machinist uses, maybe ask to watch as he installs the sleeve and get video or at least ask him for a video or a lot of photos (if you ask for one photo you'll get one photo, likely out of focus ;)).
 
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Sadly, The machinist is swamped. He has had my block for almost two months and I am not looking to add anything to his plate. There is a lot of info about sleeving engine blocks available online. I mentioned Melling. They have a catalog available online with some recommended practices etc. It would be a good place to start.
 
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Most competent automotive machine shops should be able to sleeve a standard iron block.
 
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I've seen those videos showing a block cylinder being sleeved, thought it might help for your benefit to know that it was done right but also for the forum as
I haven't seen another video showing a 1FZFE being sleeved except for the video in post #2. But I understand, most machinists would probably consider it a bother to try to get a video of their work.
 

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