40 Series Differences (1 Viewer)

Gun Runner 5

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Are there any significant differences between the mid 70's 40 Series and the ones produced in the late 70's and early 80's such as better engines, better brakes, more options etc.? When was P/S and A/C available as a factory option?
Thanks......
 
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Josie'sLandCruiser

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Hi all,

1978HJ45, the 40 series as sold in the US market was a very evolutionary vehicle. Parts from earlier production vehicles can be swapped onto later production, and vice versa.

The US market 1973 FJ40 came with the "F" engine, the J30 3 speed transmission, and drum brakes all around.

In 1974 the H42 4 speed transmission started to appear in some, but not all US market FJ40s. Also, the "late model" (1.5) F engine was used.

1975 FJ40s still had 4 wheel drum brakes, but the H42 is standard and the early 2F engine is standard.

1976 was the first year for front disc brakes. 1977 was largely the same as the '76.

In 1978 FJ40s the fully electronic ignition system was standard, and the differential pinion gears switch from coarse (10) spline to fine (27) spline.

1979 - 83 FJ40s have a different body tub than the earlier trucks, in part because of the moving of the fuel tank from inside the tub to under the tub.

The 1979-83 trucks also all have 3.73 ratio differential gears, unlike the earlier trucks 4.11 ratio diff gears.

Factory power steering first appeared in 1979 FJ40s; air conditioning was never a factory option, AFAIK.

August 1980 was when the suspension bits on the FJ40 changed from smaller diameter spring bushings to the larger bushings used on the new 60 Series.

Also in 1980/81 the H42 4 speed transmission in the FJ40 was upgraded from the early version with a 16 spline output shaft to the later version with a 19 spline output shaft. This new version of the H42 was accompanied with the "split" style t-case, while the parking brake moved from the t-case output to the rear axle.

AFAIK, "1984" FJ40s were old, unsold 1983 production trucks.

I'm sure I left out some items; other folks will add and/or correct me.

Regards,

Alan









Are there any significant differences between the mid 70's 40 Series and the ones produced in the late 70's and early 80's such as better engines, better brakes, more options etc.? When was P/S and A/C available as a factory option?
Thanks......
 
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A/C was a option in 79 same year the power steering. There are 84 production FJ40s. The US market recieved a few 83s but no 84s. Some version of the 4X series were made into 86 for some mrkets. The 70 series that replaced the 40 series were 85 and newer models.
 
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For those of you who are lucky enough to have factory A/C, does it do an adequate job of cooling?
Thanks....

With R134a, no. With R12 yes.

My '83 FJ40 (US SPEC) had factory air con and it was awesome - would freeze meat on a 100° day and still had its original charge from Toyota when I sold it in 2005. My '84 FJ40 LX also has factory air con, but Australia required that it be retro-fitted (retrospective laws are the norm in Australia where they are extremely rare here). A cool day in Oz is 100°, and it was pretty tepid. I replaced my factory unit with a Yohohama 747 suitable for R134a and now it works really well.

I had factory air con in my HJ47 troopy too and even with R12 it was not really up to the task of cooling that behemoth. I drove a mate's HJ47 pickup in Australia for a while on a 120° day and his air con got the cab to about 80° using R134a, but it took 10 minutes to do so. I suspect that had he been allowed to keep the R12 in there it would have made it too cold to be comfortable.
 
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I found a copy of the article I wrote for the Trails many years ago - complete with some of the editor-induced errors which Gary Bjork put in due to the antiquated fax machine TLCA used back then and his shortening it from 27 pages to 13 (which resulted in a few glaring errors where years were removed to make it seem as though an addition was made far earlier or far later than it actually did). Bear in mind that there was no internet at this time, so all of my research came from observations, the Specter catalog, a few books and years of obsession. I know a lot more now due to Mud, guys like Tom, Eddy and Poser and loads of reading since. However, it should give you a bare-bones idea:


From the rubble of the second World War, a defeated nation would rise to become one of the most technologically powerful entities on the planet. In the late 1940s, however, there were few indications of the potential Japan had; except, maybe for one...

Known as the 'Toyoda Jeep', a name which may cause discomfort for some, the automobile department of Toyoda Automatic Loom Works began small-scale production of the 'Model B-85' in September, 1947. A descendant of wartime personnel transports, the Model B-85 looked enough like the Willys Jeep to be considered a copyright infringement in the United States.

In 1952, the slightly re-designed 'Toyota Land Cruiser Model B-85' made its way to Australia. The Land Cruiser (as it quickly became known) with its six cylinder, overhead valve, 236.7 cubic inch gasoline engine run to the axles through a four speed transmission quickly developed a following in a country previously dominated by Land Rover.

In 1958 Toyota began production of the 'Land Cruiser FJ25'. This was to mark the beginning of the more 'modern' body style that we know today: the headlights were moved from the fenders to the grille, the windshield glass was now one piece rather than two and the hood and fenders now had that unmistakable hint of FJ40 ancestry. With these refinements, the Land Cruiser could now legally be sold in the United States.

The engine, now known as the 'F' series, was the same engine found in the Model B-85 which had proved itself so well in the harsh Australian conditions. For the time being, the F engine remained paired to a four speed gear box. However, much like the evolution of the mammal the Darwinian evolution of the Land Cruiser is a series of minor improvements to help it better survive its environment.

In 1961 Toyota went to a three speed transmission to allow the shifter to be placed on the steering column (a 'three-on-the-tree' design). Toyota also placed the transfer case shifter on the dash and added a bench seat to allow three people to sit up front in relative comfort.

In 1962 the Land Cruiser underwent another significant change: the front door wells were enlarged and squared-off to make entry and exit more comfortable, a headlight bezel was added to the grille (rather than the chrome headlight rings found on the FJ25) and a hard top and hard door became an option. The result of all this modernising was called the Land Cruiser FJ40 and would become a legend throughout the world for practicality, reliability and endurance.

The 1962, 1963 and 1964 Land Cruisers are easily identified by their corrugated top, folding rear window and the lack of the rear corner windows that have since become so uniquely Land Cruiser. The fibreglass roof cap on the 1962 and 1963 Land Cruiser also had a rather effective flip-up vent that was dropped in 1964.

For model year 1965, Toyota treated the Land Cruiser buyer to better visibility via larger side windows, the addition of the aforementioned corner windows and a one-piece, swing-up rear window. The running boards were also extended farther back to provide more protection and a larger step. 1965 was, however, the last year for the pop-out vent below the windshield. With these changes, the FJ40 now looked much as it would for the rest of its production. Electrically, the 1965 FJ40 leapt forward with the addition of a 40 amp alternator to replace the more antiquated generator.

1968 saw the introduction of Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) plates
and the addition of dash pads to meet American highway safety standards. To accommodate the dash pad, the windshield latches on the dash were replaced with the large, black-handled screws that are now more familiar to most of us (these were replaced by a humble 14mm bolt in August, 1975 when side defrosters became an option). To allow for the addition of the lower dash pads, all of the control knobs were relocated to the middle of the dashboard where they were to remain until 1983 (1984 in Canada and the rest of the world).

To improve night time safety, Toyota enlarged the small, round tail lights in 1968. Round reflectors were also added to the aprons in front of the kick vents, above the fenders and to the frame member between the new, larger tail lights.

The windshield wipers were made more efficient by eliminating one of the two wiper motors. The work of the second motor was now accomplished with a cable PTO and a worm-drive gear box to run the passenger wiper. This allowed both wipers to always work in unison and prevented them ever interfering with one-another.

While re-designing items at the top of the windshield frame, Toyota also modified the rear-view mirror. The mirror now clipped to a mount which was bolted to the windshield frame, rather than bolting directly to the frame. This was primarily done in order to comply with new DOT requirements forbidding fixed protrusions, but also helped eliminate some of the vibration of the earlier models.

A drive line change for 1968 involved an upgrade to something many people are intimately familiar with: a Birfield axle joint. This replaced a less reliable ball-and-claw joint axle used through the 1967 model year.

Less noticeable for 1968 was the switch to an accelerator cable, rather than a linkage. This switch would be short-lived however, as Toyota would revert back to an accelerator linkage at the end of 1973. A more lasting change to the motor was the change to a one-piece manifold gasket. This would help to eliminate some, though not all, of the F engine's chronic exhaust leaks.

For model year 1969, the round, fender-mounted turn signals were replaced by the orange, rectangular ones used through 1974. 1969 also represents one of the few mid-year changes Toyota did to the FJ40. Just in time for the 'Summer of Love' in June, 1969, Toyota added an adjustable bell crank to the steering mechanism. The bell crank, found directly above the Pitman arm, allowed some of the play to be adjusted out of the steering as it became apparent. The steering box was also no longer bolted directly to the shaft going to the steering wheel, but was isolated somewhat with the addition of a flexible joint.

Under the hood of the 1969 FJ40, Toyota was also busy improving. The F engine was given 10 more horsepower, increasing the total to 145. In an effort to get things just right, Toyota used three different carburettors on the F engine during model year 1969. Just in case anyone was to get in the way of this new, faster FJ40, the final change for 1969 was a louder, multi-tone horn.

A series of minor changes were instituted in October, 1969 which would give the 1970 model year Land Cruiser a facelift. The round side marker lights on the rear of the body tub were replaced by the rectangular red ones which were used throughout the remainder of the FJ40's production. At the same time, rectangular orange marker lights were added to the aprons above the fenders on either side of the hood - these would only remain until 1975. Also the round, orange marker lights below the grille and the round yellow reflectors added to the aprons in 1968 were removed entirely.

Not satisfied with the performance increase in 1969, Toyota engineers added another 10 horsepower to the F engine for 1970. This additional horsepower brought the total to 155, where it would stay for the rest of the FJ40's production in the American market.

With all of this extra horsepower, braking was the motivation for change in July, 1970 for the 1971 model year. The brake hydraulic system was no longer one single unit, but was separated into a front and a rear system which now had completely independent hydraulic systems. This reduced the likelihood of a complete loss of brakes if a leak were to develop. This change is most obvious on the master cylinder where an additional reservoir was added for the new system. A brake booster was also added to the system to make stopping more effortless.

Updates to the 1972 Land Cruiser were very subtle. The old two-piece hood was replaced by a one-piece, slightly taller one and the transmission and transfer case shifters were relocated back to the floor.

In 1973 safety and comfort seemed to be the motivating forces behind design changes. Perhaps most importantly, a secondary hood catch was added to help prevent the damage too familiar to anyone who has forgotten to re-latch their hood after checking the oil and then driven on the freeway. To help keep some things in and some things out, a locking fuel door, hinged at the bottom, was also added.

In the interior the changes were somewhat more pronounced. Fixed-back bucket seats and head rests with a small, metal center console now replaced the older three-piece bench seat and driver-side tool box. On the dashboard: the signal indicator lights were moved into the instrument cluster, the ignition switch was moved to the steering column and covered with a plastic housing, and the dome light was now actuated by a switch on the light itself and no longer by a pull-out switch on the dash. Lastly, the lower, right-side dash pad was now split to allow for the addition of a factory AM radio and padding was added to the center of the steering wheel.

Under the hood for 1973, a smog pump was added for the California models and the steering box was strengthened for models sold in all 50 states.

The 1974 modifications were varied, but make it the most easily discernable of all model year FJ40s in the United States. The single round tail lights were replaced by the more modern rectangular lights containing an amber indicator, red brake/park and clear reverse lights and the single reverse light was removed from the tub entirely. These tail lights would be used for the rest of the FJ40's production, but 1974 was the only year they were used with the one-piece lift-up rear window (however, in other markets the tail lights were available earlier and the one-piece lift-up rear window was available much longer). The rear reflectors were moved from the frame member to the body tub and the licence plate bracket was updated with two separate lights rather than just one.

1974 also marked the first significant change in the drive train for Toyota since going to a column-mounted three speed. A four speed transmission was again available as standard on all FJ40s sold in California. However, the rest of the States would have to wait until 1975 for the four speed to become standard.

Since the first gear on the new four speed is lower than on the three speed, the four speed transfer case gearing was now higher in 4-low. This lower gearing in the three speed transfer case is what made it so desirable to rock crawlers and why it was such a common replacement on late model four speeds before companies like Marlin Crawler began making top-quality after-market gears.

To meet United States safety standards, a roll bar was added to the interior and the rear jump seats were made narrower to fit between the posts of the roll bar. The front heater was also updated and modernised with the addition of plastic channels at the top of the unit rather than the all-metal design of earlier units. This new design offered three settings of ‘heat’, ‘defrost’ and ‘vent’ and delivered heat more effectively than the older designs. Under the hood for 1978 models sold in California, semi-electronic ignition became standard.

Finally, the emblems on the front aprons were modified to emphasize the name 'Land Cruiser' rather than the company 'Toyota'. Showing perhaps that the Land Cruiser had now become the flagship for Toyota.

Model year 1975 represented the conclusion of a very busy year for the Toyota engineers. Both mechanically and cosmetically, many changes were made. The most noticeable change was the way the rear doors opened to gain access to the cargo area. Gone was the old three-piece tailgate where the top half raised just high enough to scalp its owner; in its place were the two piece ambulance doors that made entry and exit a breeze. The spare tire was also moved from the right side of the tub to the left.

The driver and passenger doors were updated in 1975 to the more modern, one-piece design which was used through until 1984. This design change would eliminate the vent windows (permanently in the United States, but they would still be optional elsewhere and are a very easy option to add to the US Spec doors, as all of the mounting holes are pre-stamped into the door) but would add the 'luxury' of vinyl door panels. These new doors are significantly quieter and more durable than the older two-piece doors.

The windshield wipers and motor were moved from the top of the windshield frame to the bottom. This was done primarily to comply with American DOT requirements to eliminate dangerous protrusions within the cabin but also made them slightly less susceptible to low-hanging branches with the top off. The rubber pads on the hood for resting the windshield on when folded down were replaced with metal arches with a rubber cap, giving the hood a lighter look.

On the fenders, the rectangular orange turn signals were replaced with the larger, square parking/turn signal lights. These also had a marker light on the side (in some markets like Australia, this light is connected to the turn signal rather than the marker light), so the rectangular marker light added to the apron in 1970 was removed.

Mechanically, the changes were equally as impressive. The older 236.6 cubic inch F engine was bored out to 258 cubic inches and re-named the '2F'. Lubrication was improved dramatically, the water pump was now aluminium rather than cast iron, the valve cover was aluminium rather than stamped steel, a new carburettor topped off the new power plant and a four speed transmission was now standard in all 50 states.

Items as proven as the undercarriage also received some engineering attention in 1975. The rear shock mounts were moved from the axle to the spring plates at the bottom of the u-bolts. This allowed for a longer shock with more dampening ability and slightly more travel to the rear axle.

The location of the muffler was also moved from between the frame rails in the middle of the vehicle to the rear of the body. The exhaust now exited on the right side of the tub rather than on the left.

In 1976 the only significant change was the switch from drum brakes on the front axle to disk brakes. The rest of the world would have to wait for this upgrade; in Australia and Europe it would not be until 1979 that disc brakes were even an option. Inside the engine, the oil pump was modified slightly to help keep oil pressure steady when the engine was idling.

The changes for the 1977 model year actually occurred in August, 1976 and were focussed on creature comforts. It would appear that the Engineers at Toyota were still recuperating after their efforts for 1975. Ventilation was improved with the addition of pop-out vent windows in the rear side windows and side defrost tubes were added to the dash to keep the side windows from fogging up. Vision was improved for the driver with the addition of larger, square plastic side mirrors which were attached to the door itself rather than the door hinge. Finally, some squeaks were eliminated with the switch from a sheet metal to a tubular spare tire carrier.

The only way to distinguish a 1978 from a 1977 FJ40 is that in 1978 Toyota eliminated the fresh air vent in the cowl between the windshield and the hood. This eliminated a source of leaks but had no real effect on the vehicle.

Under the hood, the 1978 received the semi-electronic ignition (which California models had had since 1974) for all 50 states. The only other change to the 1978 FJ40 was to the horns. The new horns had the same volume and a similar tone as the old horns but were slightly smaller.

1979 would mark the final great mutation in the FJ40 Land Cruiser's evolution in North America. Cosmetically, the most noticeable change was to the grille. The headlights had to be moved 1 1/4 inches further apart to conform to European highway standards; this manifested itself as a headlight bezel that was now square and sat out slightly from the sheet metal. The fuel tank door was now hinged aft (this would be short-lived, as in 1980 it was changed to hinge forward - where it would stay through the final years of its production - and thus kept closed on the highway if one were to forget to lock it after fueling), rather than at the bottom to prevent it from bending under the weight of keys when the door is open. The bottom outside corners of the rear ambulance doors were rounded off, rather than square is they were on the 1975 – 1978 FJ40s. The corresponding corners on the tub were also rounded.

In the interior, the changes were equally as obvious and were geared toward greater comfort. The bucket seats now reclined and moved back another two inches; improving leg room for 6'6" guys like the writer tremendously. The hand brake lever was moved from below the dash to the transmission tunnel and the sun visors were enlarged slightly.

Finally, to finish off the new, more user-friendly FJ40 interior, power steering and air conditioning became factory (and not just dealer) installed options. To accommodate the power steering, threaded bolt holes were added to the head to accommodate the power steering pump. To accommodate the air conditioning, a vacuum-operated valve was added to the carburettor which increased the idle 250 RPM when the air conditioning compressor engaged.

Mechanically, the changes were also impressive in 1979. The fuel tank was re-located from under the driver's seat inside the tub to below the body, between the frame rails and the capacity was increased from 18 to 22 gallons. In the fuel line, the filter was now plastic rather than metal and a catalytic converter was added to the exhaust to help reduce emission of O3 (ozone).

In the driveline, the ring and pinon was reduced 4:11 to 3:70. This improved the FJ40's ability to cruise on the highway by lowering the RPM of the engine by nearly 14%. This improved fuel economy and made the FJ40 considerably quieter and more pleasant to drive.

About this time, import quotas began taking a bite out of the numbers of Land Cruisers Toyota could export to the United States. This is also the year that Toyota first introduced the 4WD Hilux pickup. The FJ40, while it was a very stable vehicle, was also suffering from the bad publicity which the Jeep CJ was receiving regarding its propensity to roll over when cornered hard. This combination of reasons is why we don't find many of the 1979 - 1984 FJ40s in the United States.

1981 saw many important changes. The first was a change to a completely electronic ignition - making the ignition much more trouble-free. Along with this new ignition, Toyota changed the valve train slightly; lightening it up to allow it to reach higher RPMs more rapidly. This was done mostly for the benefit of the FJ60, since the FJ40 was on its way out of North America at this point. Another change was simply a statement of confidence: a seventh digit was added to the odometer. This would forever eliminate the guesswork at how many hundreds of thousands of miles and FJ40 actually had.

The driver and passenger doors were also changed slightly with the addition of rubber sweepers and rubber window channels rather than the old felt and metal sweepers and window channels. The doors also have a stamped-in bulge at the front which engages the pin switch which engages the dome light; which in 1981 gained a third position on its switch allowing 'on', 'off' or 'door' to be selected.

For 1981, the FJ40 was updated with a split transfer case and the handbrake mechanism was moved from the back of the transfer case to the rear axle. The transmission was also now held in place with a more modern cradle which also served as the rear engine mounts. The rear engine mount which had been on the bell housing was now gone.

The FJ40 buyer who chose the rear heater option would now have it located between the front seats with its own heater valve, rather than in the rear cargo area. The new heater also came with a plastic ashtray for the comfort and convenience of rear seat passengers.

To help the FJ40 take bumps more smoothly, the leaf springs were lengthened and widened slightly. The spring eyes were also enlarged to allow for larger bushings. This made the bushings last longer and gave slightly more cushion to the suspension. Finally, the spring pin now had two 10mm bolts to hold it in place rather than just one on earlier models.

The final change to the FJ40 was for the 1983 model year (1982 in some other markets like Australia). These changes were obviously done for other markets, given Toyota only exported 300 FJ40s to the United States in 1983 and none in 1984. The dash was upgraded with a bolt-in dash which contained a clock and a more modern, slide-out ashtray. Finally, intermittent wipers became an option. These changes were to carry the FJ40 through to its extinction in the United States.

The purpose of this article is two-fold. Primarily it is intended to help people know which parts any given FJ40 has when they find it in the paper or over the phone. Secondly, it is intended to help my fellow Land Cruiser enthusiasts to easily identify the year of any given FJ40.

Although the FJ40 has gone the way of the Woolly Mammoth, its legend and offspring continue to flourish. The 70 series has filled the two door market in many parts of the world and the Bandeirante continues to be manufactured in Brazil. Through the efforts of the TLCA, Specter, Man-a-Fre and all of us who love and restore them, FJ40s have proven they will be around for a very long time to come.
 
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Thanks. At the time there was nothing about them and I just started writing notes for myself about the various changes. Then one day I realised that I had an article, so I sent it to Gary Bjork (by fax) who agreed it could be a decent read.

One day I'd love to supplement it with what I know now and do a compare/contrast with what I know about Aussie Cruisers, but between working as a lawyer and having a two-year-old son, time is in fairly short supply.

I had an idea of starting a thread using this as a starting point and getting folks on Mud to add to it. Over time we might come up with a true reference book. Thoughts?
 

FishTacos

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Thanks. At the time there was nothing about them and I just started writing notes for myself about the various changes. Then one day I realised that I had an article, so I sent it to Gary Bjork (by fax) who agreed it could be a decent read.

One day I'd love to supplement it with what I know now and do a compare/contrast with what I know about Aussie Cruisers, but between working as a lawyer and having a two-year-old son, time is in fairly short supply.

I had an idea of starting a thread using this as a starting point and getting folks on Mud to add to it. Over time we might come up with a true reference book. Thoughts?

This is great. Really helped me answer some questions about my rig. E.g. I was expecting ball-and-claw but when I pulled the knuckles apart...birfs. I thought it may have switched out fax housing due to a front end impact because it does have a 155. It also never dawned on me that the 135,145,155 referred to HP output...duh.

Rather than a thread, which so easily go off the rails, seems like the perfect application for a wiki... Anyone can add but a jury of gurus have "final copy". This may make it more apparent what the region/nation specific differences are.

Way cool Chamba. Great read. Thanks
 
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I apologise for overlooking your post (# 12) at first Chamba.

I wrongly assumed it would contain similar material to all the other "FJ40 history articles" I've read (that all seem to originate from the same source).

Here you've assembled an amazing amount of change-detail with the accuracy that only a hands-on long-term 40-series enthusiast can achieve!

You've put it together in a very easy-to-read fashion too!

A great resource for us all!

Well done indeed... :clap:

:beer:

(Even with its concentration on the USA market and on petrol models it's still well and truly worthy of copying into my computer's cluttered "land cruiser information folders".)
 
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lostmarbles said:
I apologise for overlooking your post (# 12) at first Chamba.

I wrongly assumed it would contain similar material to all the other "FJ40 history articles" I've read (that all seem to originate from the same source).

Here you've assembled an amazing amount of change-detail with the accuracy that only a hands-on long-term 40-series enthusiast can achieve!

You've put it together in a very easy-to-read fashion too!

A great resource for us all!

Well done indeed... :clap:

:beer:

(Even with its concentration on the USA market and on petrol models it's still well and truly worthy of copying into my computer's cluttered "land cruiser information folders".)

I wrote it in 1993 Tom, and if I can find the original uncut version I'll forward it to you. Thanks for the compliments. Of course, we only ever got petrol ones here, so that's all I wrote about. I don't think I'd ever actually seen a diesel cruiser then.
 

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Nice list. :beer:


1969 also represents one of the few mid-year changes Toyota did to the FJ40. Just in time for the 'Summer of Love' in June, 1969, Toyota added an adjustable bell crank to the steering mechanism. The bell crank, found directly above the Pitman arm, allowed some of the play to be adjusted out of the steering as it became apparent. The steering box was also no longer bolted directly to the shaft going to the steering wheel, but was isolated somewhat with the addition of a flexible joint.

The flexible joint on the steering shaft to the steering box did not start until the 09/72 40 in the USA.


Under the hood, the 1978 received the semi-electronic ignition (which California models had had since 1974) for all 50 states.

1978 40 series has a fully electronic distributor, is the smaller body, and was used until 07/80, when it changed to the larger body electronic unit.


Finally, to finish off the new, more user-friendly FJ40 interior, power steering and air conditioning became factory (and not just dealer) installed options. To accommodate the power steering, threaded bolt holes were added to the head to accommodate the power steering pump.

The power steering bracket on the 2F engine in the USA attaches to the engine block and not the cylinder head. The alternator was moved to the right side from the left side of the vehicle in 1975 and the alternator bracket attaches to the holes in the cylinder head on the right front side of the head.


1981 saw many important changes. The first was a change to a completely electronic ignition - making the ignition much more trouble-free.

The ignition went electronic in 1978.

To help the FJ40 take bumps more smoothly, the leaf springs were lengthened and widened slightly. The spring eyes were also enlarged to allow for larger bushings. This made the bushings last longer and gave slightly more cushion to the suspension. Finally, the spring pin now had two 10mm bolts to hold it in place rather than just one on earlier models.

The 08/80 and later leaf spring pins are held in place by one 8mm bolt instead of two 8mm bolts like the 07/80 and earlier 40 series used. (A 6mm bolt will have a 10mm head in JIS hardware, a 8mm bolt will have a 12mm head in JIS hardware)

The final change to the FJ40 was for the 1983 model year (1982 in some other markets like Australia). These changes were obviously done for other markets, given Toyota only exported 300 FJ40s to the United States in 1983 and none in 1984. The dash was upgraded with a bolt-in dash which contained a clock and a more modern, slide-out ashtray. Finally, intermittent wipers became an option. These changes were to carry the FJ40 through to its extinction in the United States.

While the dash panel had the space for a clock in the USA, the vehicles were not sent here with them according to Marv, and I have seen 10 12/82 and later USA 40 series and not one had a clock in the dash.

Again,

Thank you for taking the time to document this and for sharing it.

You have your Juris Doctorate? ;)





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