4.88 or 5.29 gears for my situation? (1 Viewer)

Joined
Oct 29, 2015
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Irvine, CA
I’m on 37’s and 4:88’s @ sea level. It’s perfect. Feels good on the highway going 75/80. Even at 100 it felt pretty good. I did some rock crawling wheeling a couple weeks ago and I didn’t have any desire for any lower gearing.

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Joe Link

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Jun 7, 2005
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549
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Portland, OR
So, if you don't do a lot of hard core rock crawling, why do you need 35s or 37s? I've done some of the more hardcore stuff around here, Imogene Pass and Engineer Pass, with 255/85/16 KM3s on an IFS Tacoma. If you're already heavy, then a 35 or 37 will make it even heavier and slower even with the regear.

What rock crawling have you not been able to do with your current 33s?

That's a great question, there isn't much I haven't been able to tackle. I'll be honest, a big part is looks. I'm also fairly inexperienced when it comes to wheeling and I'm more of the "get to the spot" rather than "tackle every obstacle" type, and I know things are usually easier with larger tires.

I’m on 37’s and 4:88’s @ sea level. It’s perfect. Feels good on the highway going 75/80. Even at 100 it felt pretty good. I did some rock crawling wheeling a couple weeks ago and I didn’t have any desire for any lower gearing.

Great info, thanks!

This was an incredibly difficult decision, I think I've read every thread here on the subject. Ultimately I've decided to go with 4:88's. I can run my current 33's until they wear out and then run either 35's or 37's. From what I've read I won't want to run 5.29's in an overland rig with an LS swap.

Thanks for all the help guys.
 

Bambusiero

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Apr 11, 2005
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720
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Chandler, AZ
Like @Road Apple said
My dream setup :
37's and 5.29, which puts you at over-revving by about 10% relative to stock, and then 10% under-drive High-Range transfer case gears - puts your highway rev's back to stock, for long highway trip mpg, and 2nd gear is always there for climbing grades. And then - the combination with transfer case Low-Range gears gets you the deepest possible low-range gear ratio. Changing out both high and low range gears in the transfer case - the ratios interact. Best of both worlds, seems to me - but lots of money.
 

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