New Motor? Advise _LONG

Discussion in '60-Series Wagons' started by WHITCHCOCK, Oct 27, 2005.

  1. WHITCHCOCK

    WHITCHCOCK

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    Well fellas, I mostly lurk and pick up tips but I’ve got a bit of a quandary and would appreciate the wisdom of the board.

    After fighting with various smog control problems on my 1990 FJ62, and a botched PO tune up, I popped open the valve cover to adjust and they were so far out I couldn’t believe it (not 1/100”ths of adjustment 1/10”ths or more one was out the better part of a ¼”). I wouldn’t be surprised if this thing had been last adjusted in Japan.

    Now, it runs tons better (go figure), but according to my resident Toyota sage because of the neglect a cam lobe is likely badly worn, and is the source of the intermitant squeak from within the engine – I tend to agree. But as an aside, the adjustment screw for the valves are towards the very top of their range. It might last 50k or 5k; we’ll have to see. This engine has 183k.

    All that said, I’m figuring a new engine is on the horizon and being that the body/tranny/transfer are all good it is worth doing. I considered a v8 conversion (blasphemer), but I just do not want to go through the hassle. This is a keeper truck for me, and not a DD (I get a free work truck (whoo-hoo), so time is not an issue nor is expense within reason (so forget the $10k Toyota diesel, which would be nice).

    So, as I see it my options are,
    A- A lower mileage used motor from Cruiser parts or the like with new gaskets, exhaust, Downey intake/fuel injectors. Cost: $2500?
    B- A new/rebuilt from MAF with exhaust, Downey intake/fuel injectors. Cost: $4-5K? Does anyone have one of these and are they worth it? I’m in Maryland so I hate to think what all of the shipping will cost me.
    C- SOR used motor- Cost $4-5K.
    D- Rebuilt it here, myself. Replace everything. Cost ??????

    please weigh in with your thoughts:

    I must admit I am leaning towards B or D; although I am a serviceable shade tree, I have never rebuilt a motor and would need help from a local friend who has done so. I just have looked at the SOR prices for parts and I just don’t know if there would be any real cost savings when all is said and done versus buying a whole motor.

    I look forward to your responses and if anyone else has other ideas, I will eagerly consider them.

    Bill

    I
     
  2. Hildy

    Hildy

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    If I had the money I'd go with the MAF 3FE. I heard they have tons of power for an F series. It would probably be less hassle than the other options, just pricey.
     
  3. Mike S

    Mike S

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    That is not much mileage for a 62. New valves, cam, and a head rebuild might get you through if the compression is within spec.

    M
     
  4. WHITCHCOCK

    WHITCHCOCK

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    Mike

    My thoughts exactly, as far as the milage is concerned, and the compression is within spec . I just figured if I have it have it a part anyway, I might as well look at the pistons and lower end while I was in there. But perhaps this would be going overboard. THoughts? And can you hazard a guess for the cost of parts. I figure I'll be going through SOR, unless you know of other options.

    The PO was the US GOV, for the majority of its life (1 guy had it for a year before I got it) and it looks like it was stored inside its whole life - no rust anywhere (and a large measure why I bought it) and the rest of it is all original. I've just found weird stuff like these valves; I'm sure it got oil changes, but I'm not sure if it got much else.
     
  5. Tinker

    Tinker

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    Typically when you do a top-end rebuild the bottom goes out next. When you pull the head, you could drop the pan, check the crank, replace the main & rod bearings, hone the cylinders & replace the rings, & save the aggravation of pulling the engine & carting it around for machine work. If you find something bad, you can still pull the engine.

    Engines are deceptively simple, particularly low-tech, low-torque pushrod versions.

    I always prefer rebuilding the engine I know to buying a rebuilt I know nothing about.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2005
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