Events/Trails LCDC 6 Official Thread

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Lost Wages
Yep - you are right. I'm obviously not a HAM operator. Looking a the specs, there is nothing that would prevent us from using the radios this way, it's just not legal. Turns out, I've been using GMRS without paying the $25 $70 fee as well. Great - Now feds will be knocking. :bang:


..I went ahead and ordered a cheapo baofang just to have in the kit. What kind of commitment is the HAM license?
I am sure there are free ones out there but I am using this site to study. HamTestOnline - Ham Radio Exam Courses and Practice Tests
It's only $25 and they guarantee you will pass. Generally 10 hours of study is enough. The test is $15 and depending on the location, they may let you take it several times to try to pass. It will cost you $15 each time and is limited by the number of different exams they have (usually 3) and who is doing the testing.
 

Markuson

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If you always watch for the vehicle behind you this shouldn't happen. If the vehicle behind you stops, you stop, then the vehicle in front of you stops, and so on.
Good reminder about keeping an eye on truck behind you.

About cons in groups...

Groups of trucks often stretches backward and around blind corners… Many of which may be only wide enough for one way traffic. When you come face-to-face with another group of vehicles, it is occasionally quite difficult and even impossible at times to try and pass without someone backing up, pulling over, or negotiating a group pass that might not always agree with right-of-way defaults. Having the ability to communicate with all trucks front Becomes extremely helpful. Because. otherwise, People don’t know whether they need to back up into a pull out if possible… Continue forward because the oncoming group is giving way for your group to pass… Or whether there is no alternative but for everyone to back up to allow the pass.
Beyond this safety, Communication with the full group is also a real courtesy in cases where everyone has stopped. For the first two trucks, they may know that it’s a one minute delay or a 30 minute delay. but meanwhile… The people in back have no idea. So… They stay in their truck ready to go… Not realizing that it will be at least five minutes or more. If they simply knew this, they could get out for food, bathroom break, or etc.

Simply getting a heads up dramatically reduces stress levels & allows people to know when there is time to hop out and take photos, etc. while waiting for something to clear.


All that to say… While I agree that noting the truck in front of and in back of you is a good practice, that is not enough to alleviate the issues described above.
 
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sdnative

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It’s a little more complicated than that when wheeling in groups, IME.

....
Completely agree, I wasn't saying that making sure to watch for the vehicle behind you eliminated the need or advantage of comms. Just one more form of group travel etiquette that I often see ignored.

Another advantage of comms is to warn the vehicles behind you of the presence and detail of oncoming traffic.

I am a huge proponent of comms on the trail, especially ham.
 

Markuson

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Completely agree, I wasn't saying that making sure to watch for the vehicle behind you eliminated the need or advantage of comms. Just one more form of group travel etiquette that I often see ignored.

Another advantage of comms is to warn the vehicles behind you of the presence and detail of oncoming traffic.

I am a huge proponent of comms on the trail, especially ham.
Ya, I ended up responding to your post, but wasn’t meant as a rebuttal at all. ;) Just a general comment about how coms are worth having in groups.

You brought up a key point of keeping within sight of the truck behind you.
 

Markuson

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I am a ham nerd sometimes. I have 2-3 radios going at any given time. A dual band mobile and HT up front,and a VHF doing APRS in the back which can be used as a backup to the main radio if needed.

View attachment 2348299
Wooo! A fellow nerd! ;)

I’m frankly anything BUT a radio expert...but when you need them...you can REALLY need them. :cheers:
 

Romer

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If you always watch for the vehicle behind you this shouldn't happen. If the vehicle behind you stops, you stop, then the vehicle in front of you stops, and so on.
True, but it does happen. You can get distracted by the trail or your companion. Better to have Comms so you can stop and ask if they are OK back there. Often folks will stop to take a picture without letting others know

Just my view as a Trail leader at Cruise Moab since 2005
 
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If you always watch for the vehicle behind you this shouldn't happen. If the vehicle behind you stops, you stop, then the vehicle in front of you stops, and so on.
Everyone in the group should have an FRS/GMRS radio. HAM is better but not everyone is licensed.
  • As a trail leader it's really helpful if the tail gunner radios to me that a faster vehicle is coming up behind us so I can pull us over. Without radios the guy passing in his side-by-side has to pass each vehicle individually as the trail permits, which can end up separating the group.
  • It allows people behind the leader to ask the group to stop if they have a vehicle issue, want to stop and take a photo, etc. As a driver you aren't always paying attention to the guys behind you - sometimes (many times) your focus is on the trail in front of you
  • It allows folks to relay information to the group - "check out that moose on the hill", "watch out for this off-camber section", or "we took a wrong turn and need to back up".
I have 2 radios and so I'm always willing to lend one out, but everyone should try to buy a set. They're $30 and if you find you don't need them someone's kids will gladly take them off your hands for you. I've had people who don't have a radio tell me the trip is kind of boring and quiet as they don't really know what's happening or why we are stopping, turning around, etc.
 

PhuckItImDone

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Last year I managed to listen on the Bao-Feng and use some Amazon Motorola walkies to comm if I had anything that I needed to shout out. Without a license I was fine, I just needed to be able to hear more than anything.
 

tincan45

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I'm sure there is a discussion to be had here, but I noticed this video on setting up the baofeng for FRS/GMRS TX/RX. I'll probably try to get my tech license before LCDC as comms have always interested me, but never made much of an investment. At the very least, I'll setup a handheld for RX on HAM and TX/RX on GMRS. I have a dedicated GMRS (Midland MXT275) only because buddies had GMRS.
 

indycole

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Hey is it still possible to get in on this event? Schedule just opened up and it would be great to meet everyone. Thanks.
Sure, we'd love to have you. Go ahead and register here and then follow the directions at the end of registration to Venmo the event fee of $100. The only caveat is that we've already placed the t-shirt order so your event shirt won't be included. We're ordering a few extras so hopefully we'll have one in your size. You still get the rest of the swag, though :)

Edited to add the actual registration link: 2020 Land Cruiser Destination Club Event in Fort Collins, CO
 
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LCDC newbie question #57: am I right assuming that fuel management each day won’t be a real concern (stock tank, not planning on bringing Jerry cans) as we will be relatively close to FC? Originally I was going to stay in FC but now we are camping 20 miles out or so. I know it will be a bit of a pita to drive in to FC to fuel up but I’m not seeing it as a big deal. I really don’t have a good feel for how much gas you run through at an event like this.
 
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LCDC newbie question #57: am I right assuming that fuel management each day won’t be a real concern (stock tank, not planning on bringing Jerry cans) as we will be relatively close to FC? Originally I was going to stay in FC but now we are camping 20 miles out or so. I know it will be a bit of a pita to drive in to FC to fuel up but I’m not seeing it as a big deal. I really don’t have a good feel for how much gas you run through at an event like this.
I can't speak about this specific location or what trails you'll run, but my experience with prior trips is that you don't need extra fuel. It's a good idea to fill up before leaving for the day if you can of course since with the slow pace of trails you might get 5 MPG.
 
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LCDC newbie question #57: am I right assuming that fuel management each day won’t be a real concern (stock tank, not planning on bringing Jerry cans) as we will be relatively close to FC? Originally I was going to stay in FC but now we are camping 20 miles out or so. I know it will be a bit of a pita to drive in to FC to fuel up but I’m not seeing it as a big deal. I really don’t have a good feel for how much gas you run through at an event like this.
You'll be fine. You can grab gas at Ted's Place, the Poudre Canyon entrance off 287, or Glen Echo Gas should be open in Rustic on Hwy 14. So you aren't likely to ever be more than 30ish miles away from a station and I doubt you'll burn than more than half a tank a day between travel to trail and travel on trail, if that.

Edit: I'll also add that if this summer does not get wetter, anyone camping should prepare for stage 2 fire restrictions. This would mean you can no longer use established campground/picnic fire pits and grills. So be prepared to use "fire devices using pressurized liquid or gas with shutoff valves" as the USFS likes to say.
 
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Markuson

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You'll be fine. You can grab gas at Ted's Place, the Poudre Canyon entrance off 287, or Glen Echo Gas should be open in Rustic on Hwy 14. So you aren't likely to ever be more than 30ish miles away from a station and I doubt you'll burn than more than half a tank a day between travel to trail and travel on trail, if that.

Edit: I'll also add that if this summer does not get wetter, anyone camping should prepare for stage 2 fire restrictions. This would mean you can no longer use established campground/picnic fire pits and grills. So be prepared to use "fire devices using pressurized liquid or gas with shutoff valves" as the USFS likes to say.
Costco has a great deal on portable propane fire pits right now... They radiate heat reallywell once the pumice rocks heat up.
 
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