Jim C valve adjustment write-up

Ducks

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Does anyone have Jim C's valve adjustment write up? The link on the tech pages is dead.

I am researching how to do the valve adjustment. I have the FSM but am somewhat confused.

Here are my syptoms: ticking noise from enigne before engine warms up, follows the RPMs, not noticeable at idle. Thought that I would start with the easiest thing first. Suppose I should do it anyway. Any other ideas on what it might be?

Cheers,
Chad
 
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Bump I could use this info as well. I usually have my mechanic do it at every 15,000 miles, but I hoping to do this one.
 
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Does the 'ticking' sound 'sharp' ? ( imagine an ice pick tapping on a table)

and then goes away as the engine warms up ?

May not be valves !

"Under" #6 exhaust manifold pipe there a metal tube that feeds the EGR.
Tube has gasket at flange where it bolts to manifold.
Gasket does poop out....
...and makes the sound like I asked in the questions above.....

Start you engine (when engine 'cold'), use hose or something for a 'stethascope' and listen ( can lay under rig & reach up put hose by flange)

Pete
 

Ducks

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Does the 'ticking' sound 'sharp' ? ( imagine an ice pick tapping on a table)

and then goes away as the engine warms up ?

May not be valves !

"Under" #6 exhaust manifold pipe there a metal tube that feeds the EGR.
Tube has gasket at flange where it bolts to manifold.
Gasket does poop out....
...and makes the sound like I asked in the questions above.....

I have that problem too. I just replaced the gasket. That had more of a "fftt" sound that was more driver side-ish. This sounds more like the center of the engine and it is a higher pitched ticking sound.

Start you engine (when engine 'cold'), use hose or something for a 'stethascope' and listen ( can lay under rig & reach up put hose by flange)

Pete

Thanks Pete. I'll try that out. I'm still a bit nervous working around the engine while it is running. Lost a bit of a finger to stuff like that. I'll just get over it.

Cheers,
Chad
 
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Hey there, sometimes the air injector rail will make that ticking noise if they come loose or the tubes crack. It is another can of worms but use two wrenches see if you can snug them. Watch to see that the tube is not twisting with the flair nut. It is easier than a vavle adjust.
 

Ducks

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Yeah, I've been doing a lot of searches and reading the threads. I was looking for a step-by-step write up that was a little more clear than the FSM. A lot of people mention that they like the Jim C method. Since the link is broke, I was just wondering if someone had that locally or if they knew where another writeup was at.

:beer: Chad
 

Ducks

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The birfield link worked and I thought I would also attach the write up here as well just in case the link stops working again.

:beer: Chad


Jim Chenoweth on Valve Adjustment:
No, you do not adjust valves with the engine running. Sounds like a good way to break tools, fingers, rocker arms... Adjusting valves w/ engine running applies to some silly hydraulic cammed American engines. Run the engine to operating temperature. Remove air cleaner & valve cover. Use a long 3/8 ratchet with a 14MM socket and crack all the adjuster lock nuts loose. With the key off, put vehicle in 4th gear, 2-hi. Now rock vehicle while watching the timing window on bellhousing. You can easily move the engine in small increments by bumping the weight of the vehicle against it in fourth gear. When the engine gets to the TDC mark (the line, not the ball) you can adjust half of the valves. Then bump vehicle (forward or backward, doesn't matter) to rotate the crank 360, back to the TDC mark. Adjust the other valves. The two groups of valves are 1,2,3,5,7,9 and 4,6,8,10,11,12. Check the Haynes manual to verify these numbers. When you think you're all done, double check all lock nuts for tightness, this will tell you if you forgot to adjust any (Now you know why the FIRST thing you did was break them all loose.) Now you can start the engine (If you can plug all the disconnected vacuum fittings) and listen to how quiet things are, even w/ the valve cover removed.

The intake valves are set at .008", and the exhaust valves at .014". You use a feeler gauge for this work. The tools you'll need to set the valves are a 14mm wrench, a big flat-head screwdriver and the aforementioned feeler gauge. I've been told that the gauge should feel "snug" - some friction on the metal as you slide it in and out. There's a neato tool from snap-on just for this task that combines the wrench & screwdriver, so you only need two hands (instead of two-and-a-half) to set the timing.

Sometimes the act of tightening the locking nut on the valve adjuster (wc?) will cause it to move along the rocker shaft laterally, creating a false tightness. Make sure that the rocker is centered on the rocker shaft after you tighten it.

Also, the valve cover gasket occasionally comes loose, and reinstalling with this thing loose and not properly seated will cause some nasty oil leaks, blue smoke from under the hood, nervous looks from your wife and green faces on your kids. Not that I'd know. In my experience the valve cover gasket for a 2F from Toyota is rubber or nylon rubber. When mine came loose, I gave it a visual inspection, then cleaned it and the rim of the valve cover gently with a rag and some brake cleaner. I reassembled it with black RTV (between gasket and cover), put it on the tailgate and let a spare tire sit on it overnight.

While you're doing the valves you might as well check idle and fuel mixture settings on the carb and the distributor timing.
 

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