!?! Is this correct (FSM) for 3B - safe?!!? (1 Viewer)

MrMoMo

That's not rust, it's Canadian patina...
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Ok, I'm starting to troubleshoot my lack of power in my 3B - having recently driven another 3B cruiser, that felt like it had twice the power of mine... (no, it wasn't turbo'd!!)

Reading the FSM, it states the following...

Insufficient Maximum Speed;

Start engine, depress accelerator pedal to the floor and check that maximum speed is as specified below

Maximum speed 4,100 RPM


If not, adjust with the maximum speed adjusting screw

:eek::eek:WHAT!!!!:eek::eek: is it really OK to flat foot the 3B with no load on it? That sounds CRAZY talk, good way to end up with a pile of busted parts!!! Has anyone ever done this??

I'm sure toyota knows what they are doing, but this sounds pretty risky to me!!
 
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You just do it long enough to verify the rpm. Unless your engine is about to fall apart it will take it no problem.
Tweak the adjustment with the engine idling or off and do it again until you get it right.
 
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its going to sound absolutely terrifying though. maybe i'm a :princess:, but I don't like to be leaning over a 3B at anything more than idle - it sounds like theres a dragon in there!

should be safe though. there is probably 1000 or more rpm to the catastrophic failure limit of the meaty parts, and without any load on the engine it probably sees greater stress on the highway.
 

MrMoMo

That's not rust, it's Canadian patina...
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Well, I think I'll try everything else first!!

Does anyone know off hand what size socket I need to remove my injectors? I have everything else loosened off, but don't have a socket big enough for them.

Thanks!
 
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https://forum.ih8mud.com/members/amaurer.htmlDad was an engineer for CAT. One day he took me down to show me around and to take a look at the V12 cyl ship motor he just rebuilt. The cylinders on this thing you could actually physically hide in with the heads off. So there it was all ready to be started for its test run and I got given a pair of earmuffs. Standard operating procedure was "throttle set to max and hit the starter" for testing newly rebuilt engines and it still is. They are run for a couple of hours like that, yes with a load connected of course. In any case I can honestly say that was one of the most terryifing experiences standing next to that pounding piece of machinery the size of a truck, exhausts glowing orange. I was actually shaking when I came out of there a few minutes later, dad just had a smirk on his face.
 
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Dad was an engineer for CAT. One day he took me down to show me around and to take a look at the V12 cyl ship motor he just rebuilt. The cylinders on this thing you could actually physically hide in with the heads off. So there it was all ready to be started for its test run and I got given a pair of earmuffs. Standard operating procedure was "throttle set to max and hit the starter" for testing newly rebuilt engines and it still is. They are run for a couple of hours like that, yes with a load connected of course. In any case I can honestly say that was one of the most terryifing experiences standing next to that pounding piece of machinery the size of a truck, exhausts glowing orange. I was actually shaking when I came out of there a few minutes later, dad just had a smirk on his face.

I have to strongly disagree here, I'm a retired Marine engineer (1st class STCW certificate of competency ie, Chief engineer unlimited) with 20 years at sea and 10 years as a flag state senior marine inspector, and that is NOT an accepted practice whatsoever, even on medium sized engines as described.

To put it very briefly,after a rebuild, on 1 or more cylinders, the engine is prelubed, the jacket water (coolant) and engine entablature brought up to temperature and the engine is rolled over slowly on its turning gear. All is stopped and if everything seems okay the turning gear is withdrawn and the engine rolled over and blown through. If all is still okay the engine is started and idled for a short period of time (5 minutes or so) and then shut down. Lube oil pressure is maintained by the prelube pumps. The engine is allowed to rest for a period and any hot spots (caused by localized friction ie. tight clearances) cool. The engine is then restarted and using a run-in routine (usually manufacturer supplied proceedure) it is subjected to gradually increased speeds for varying periods of time. This allows for the wearing in of all the components in a controlled manner. Failure to do this will cause localized overheating leading to wiped bearings, micro-seizures of sliding surfaces (cylinders pistons etc), etc. In allcases, localized point overheating can cause major damage, if not a full crankcase explosion ( a very, very bad thing indeed).
Often the break in period is punctuated with shut downs and internal inspections.
A break in run can take about 12 hours just to get it to running at rated speed, depending on engine size and type. Even then the engine will be closely monitored and inspected for some time before undergoing heavy loading.
As for the maximum speed setting and overspeed tests, all diesels will undergo these on governor setup and as annual inspections. The engine is brought up to running temperature, then (normally) the speed is raised by moving the fuel rack manually and monitoring the engine speed on an accurate tachometer. This test only lasts for a few seconds and the engine is allowed to return to idle (or shut down for the overspeed) immediately.
I have personally seen poorly informed individuals (yes, even some with P. Eng after their names) try to shorten reccomended factory break in procedures and put an engine on to full load prematurely and have seen the engines fail catastrophically! If you're interested,google diesel crankcase explosions and read about the dangers of "hot spots".
 
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I hear what you're saying. I can only tell you how it's done at the CAT centre here which deals takes care of the whole state. It's always done the same way and they have not had one engine blow up in all the years of their operation due to this practice.
 
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There are dozens of things you should do first before checking the maximum speed. Tune it up and make all the normal maintenance adjustments.

Check your diaphragm, check your timing, check your valves, test your injectors, replace your filters... the list goes on, and on...


You can go to step #20 if you haven't done steps 1 through 19 first.

~John
 

crushers

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have you done a compression test? that is the FIRST thing i would recommend...
Ok, I'm starting to troubleshoot my lack of power in my 3B - having recently driven another 3B cruiser, that felt like it had twice the power of mine... (no, it wasn't turbo'd!!)

Reading the FSM, it states the following...

Insufficient Maximum Speed;

Start engine, depress accelerator pedal to the floor and check that maximum speed is as specified below

Maximum speed 4,100 RPM


If not, adjust with the maximum speed adjusting screw

:eek::eek:WHAT!!!!:eek::eek: is it really OK to flat foot the 3B with no load on it? That sounds CRAZY talk, good way to end up with a pile of busted parts!!! Has anyone ever done this??

I'm sure toyota knows what they are doing, but this sounds pretty risky to me!!
 

MrMoMo

That's not rust, it's Canadian patina...
Joined
Nov 11, 2005
Messages
2,445
Location
~Kingston, ON, pero soñando de Panamá
 
have you done a compression test? that is the FIRST thing i would recommend...
Nope, it did cross my mind, but I don't have a diesel compression tester (yet), but I do have a spare set of injectors. I'm a little scared of doing a compression test... I might have to swap out the engine after seeing the results!!

I did notice that princess auto has a diesel compression tester on sale this week... might just pick it up tomorrow.
 

crushers

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buddy, fear is something to embrace not run away from.
beg, borrow buy a compression tester and get it done.
if it is bad then you know, drive the crap out of it and have a spare sitting ready to go in...
if it is decent then you can look for other reasons but to look for other reasons before looking at the base is a waste of energy, time and money.
 

MrMoMo

That's not rust, it's Canadian patina...
Joined
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Is the thread pitch on the glow plugs common? (like spark plugs) P.A. has a diesel compression gauge on for $139, says it fits a bunch of Ford/GM/Cummins, would it fit toyotas?
 
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Is the thread pitch on the glow plugs common? (like spark plugs) P.A. has a diesel compression gauge on for $139, says it fits a bunch of Ford/GM/Cummins, would it fit toyotas?
Harbor freight has a tester for $50 and it comes with the adapter you need...
 

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