Ham Tests

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Pappy and I just did some tests with our radios. He was using a Yaesu FT-7800 with a Comet 3.8 db Gain antenna, and I was using a Yaesu HT VX-170 (5 watt) with the standard (I presume 0 db) antenna. On the first try from his house I got him at 65 watts (full power) with 1-2 (of 10) bars, and on the second where he climbed up to the mesa on Unser I got him at full power with 2 bars. These are along the profiles below, with significant dirt in the way. He got me loud and clear on the Sandia Megalink repeater, which is 9 miles from me.
JS Ham.jpg
JS Ham 2.jpg
 

pappy

photosynthesizing
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Too far north. Too far east.
Pappy and I just did some tests with our radios. He was using a Yaesu FT-7800 with a Comet 3.8 db Gain antenna, and I was using a Yaesu HT VX-170 (5 watt) with the standard (I presume 0 db) antenna.

Minor correction. I have a Yaesu FT-2800 2m only radio. The FT-7800 puts out only a puny 50W at full power :grinpimp:. Repeater worked great with Steve's HT.
 
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Albuq, NM area
Cool test, guys. My reading of this is that you used the Sandia Crest MegaLink repeater for all portions of this test. A repeater at high elevation makes a big difference. Yaesu makes good equipment, the FT-2800 has a good reputation. I have never looked closely at the VX-170, but the eHam.net reviews look good.

The standard "rubber duck" type antenna used on VHF handie-talkies are relatively poor performers. Gain figures look more like -3 dB to -6 dB. However, they are short, flexible, and do the job.

If you want to see your HT come alive, use a "Hot Rod". This was a collapsible end-fed half-wave made by AEA. I don't think AEA makes the Hot Rod anymore, but I have one made by MFJ and two by Larsen. Some years ago I climbed Handies Peak (a 14,000 ft peak near Lake City, CO) and talked on 2M FM direct with a ham on Sandia Crest. I had a 5W hand-held with a Hot Rod, and he had a similar hand-held with some kind of portable beam. The distance was approximately 300 miles!

MFJ now calls this the MFJ-1714 LongRanger Telescopic Endfed Halfwave 2 Meter HT Antenna
MFJ Enterprises

73,
Andy
N5GIC
 
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Messages
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We were on direct (simplex) 146.46 for the tests with LOS as shown. On the repeater test we were loud and clear.

Thanks for the tip on the LongRanger.



Cool test, guys. My reading of this is that you used the Sandia Crest MegaLink repeater for all portions of this test. A repeater at high elevation makes a big difference. Yaesu makes good equipment, the FT-2800 has a good reputation. I have never looked closely at the VX-170, but the eHam.net reviews look good.

The standard "rubber duck" type antenna used on VHF handie-talkies are relatively poor performers. Gain figures look more like -3 dB to -6 dB. However, they are short, flexible, and do the job.

If you want to see your HT come alive, use a "Hot Rod". This was a collapsible end-fed half-wave made by AEA. I don't think AEA makes the Hot Rod anymore, but I have one made by MFJ and two by Larsen. Some years ago I climbed Handies Peak (a 14,000 ft peak near Lake City, CO) and talked on 2M FM direct with a ham on Sandia Crest. I had a 5W hand-held with a Hot Rod, and he had a similar hand-held with some kind of portable beam. The distance was approximately 300 miles!

MFJ now calls this the MFJ-1714 LongRanger Telescopic Endfed Halfwave 2 Meter HT Antenna
MFJ Enterprises

73,
Andy
N5GIC
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
Albuq, NM area
That is a about as far as you can go with that kind of signal path. Much beyond that, even higher power won't help because Earth curvature dominates.

Pappy, I'll help you in any way that I can. You have been a great Elmer for me with Toyota trucks.

You guys are not clueless about ham radio. Looks to me that you are having fun exploring your new capabilities. I think an important thing for you to do is get familiar with all the repeaters in New Mexico. The status of repeaters change, for example the Chama area repeater is having trouble because it is solar powered, covered with snow, has cold batteries, and is getting a lot of APRS use. I am no expert, but I've been fiddling with amateur radio since 1977. Most of my experience is old technology, but I know some cutting-edge kind of hams.

I check on the HDC forum when I get a chance, and I will post if I think I have something intelligent to contribute (doesn't happen often). Maybe I can make it to your April club meeting. Also, you can email nylla@hotmail.com as an alternative to Mud.

73,
Andy
 

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