FJ 40 Suspension linking (1 Viewer)

Joined
Apr 15, 2021
Messages
7
Location
SAN DIEGO
Good Morning ... first time on this forum and hopefully not the last!
I have a 71 FJ40 ready for suspension upgrades, need help on a shop or individual that can get it done, not really interested in doing it myself since i dont have the time or the knowledge , need someone that has done it successfully.
3 link in the front ?
3 link in the rear ?
4 link in the rear with 3 link in the fornt?
3 link in the front and leaf springs in the rear?
sooo confusing, oh what to do?????
help!!!!
Thanks in advanced!
 
Joined
Mar 23, 2009
Messages
14
Location
Dallas TX
Just thought I would add to this.... I'm in the middle of doing 4-link in the rear and 3-link in the front. I'm just finishing the rear end, I just put on the coil overs yesterday. Things have gone fairly smoothly so far, a little more fab work than I expected but nothing too out of hand. I imagine the front will be a little more involved, I was quoted 10K per axle from Proffitts (not including the axle cost), so I decided to tackle it myself. I expect a slow process b/c I can't work on it every day but I'll keep you posted if you want.
Good Luck!
 
Joined
Aug 24, 2014
Messages
3,576
Location
Woodinville Washington
well, i think im getting an idea of what this will take , ( both financially and effort wise) the good part is that someone has done it successfully, i need some thinking time, wish you guys were in the state... by the way, i'm not going to pretend i totally understand your explanation but i appreciate it , im a construction guy with a off road addiction... thanks for the education and the help!
suspension can be really difficult if it's a clean sheet design. When I started, I looked at JK suspensions and got a grasp of why Jeep did what they did. Coils move the axles further out and allow you to easily adjust how the suspension reacts to individual challenges. You mentioned you wanted ride comfort. Start there, copy either a JK suspension or a long-arm JK suspension.... leave the heavy lifting to the engineers with finite analysis on their desktops. Honestly, you can't go too wrong if you stay true to their design.
 

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