Electronically-Controlled Adjustable Valve Suspension? - 100 Series (1 Viewer)

suprarx7nut

The YotaMD Guy
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Thankssuprarx7nut - couple questions for you or anyone else:

1. If I abandon the concept of adjustable valves in lieu of a high quality suspension upgrade, which specific manufacturer's and set ups do you think will give me "buttery" ride quality, given my wheel preference/stubborn-ness?

2. It is possible to install Toyota OEM AHC in my 04" LC? Is that something best done at a dealer? Is it going to break the bank, or be less than a high quality (non-adjustable) after-market setup (Icon/Slee/etc.)

3. Is there anyone out there in ih8mud land who thinks in-vehicle electronic adjustment is an option/possibility for me?

1. Can't speak to any well enough to answer that. I think @hickuptruck gave some great anecdotes to this end, though.
2. Possible? Definitely. Practical? Not in the slightest. I wouldn't entertain the thought.
3. Check this out. Tein offers an electronically adaptive suspension on the 100. They're known for making "good" import suspension systems, but not super high-end. What they can offer, is a massive scale company that can afford to attempt electronic suspension in aftermarket applications where other companies can't.

I think you would need this: TEIN.co.jp/e: 4X4 DAMPER SPORT - PRODUCTS


And this:
1601789530190.png


Total cost around $1,800 and you'd be a test subject. No guarantees on performance, but all the ingredients seem to be present. I would expect it to be a step down from AHC, but maybe a step up in comfort/performance mix from any other static option out there. And at $1800 it's cheaper than the top shelf static systems.
 
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Perhaps I can chime in here as someone with AHC and deleted it for a high end suspension from Radflo.

You either can have buttery smooth, or you can pound washboards....its either or. With your plans, you will need a very heavy sprung stiff suspension to hold all that extra weight. However, you won't be riding with that weight as a daily in Portland. You will hate your ride as it is overly stiff and every crack and bump will transmit into your cab without the suspension taking most of it in.

I had AHC, loved it but ditched it for a Radflo 2.5RR setup. About as high-end as it gets. So I traded buttery smooth-ness for being able to pound washboard roads. However, the suspension is much much harsher, and every crack I can feel in the road. I have a lot more imperfections transmitted into the cab. Sure, loaded down with weight imprves the ride 10%. Theres no static suspension out there that will provide best of both world where you will be able to carry the weight you stated you want, while having a butter smooth ride, especially unloaded.

Thus, a dynamic suspension like the AHC, the only dynamic system out there for the 100 series LX could fit your needs. Honestly if you dropped $4k into the suspension, it won't handle as good on road as if you had a refreshed stock system because its a harsher ride.

Thanks for taking the time to summarize that.
 
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1. Can't speak to any well enough to answer that. I think @hickuptruck gave some great anecdotes to this end, though.
2. Possible? Definitely. Practical? Not in the slightest. I wouldn't entertain the thought.
3. Check this out. Tein offers an electronically adaptive suspension on the 100. They're known for making "good" import suspension systems, but not super high-end. What they can offer, is a massive scale company that can afford to attempt electronic suspension in aftermarket applications where other companies can't.

I think you would need this: TEIN.co.jp/e: 4X4 DAMPER SPORT - PRODUCTS


And this: View attachment 2455154

Total cost around $1,800 and you'd be a test subject. No guarantees on performance, but all the ingredients seem to be present. I would expect it to be a step down from AHC, but maybe a step up in comfort/performance mix from any other static option out there. And at $1800 it's cheaper than the top shelf static systems.

Thanks, I'll do some research on that gear.
 
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Portland, Oregon
Another newbie question: Could a simple, inexpensive air bag/air lift kit from Air Lift, Firestone, etc, counteract the weight in the rear of the vehicle while loaded up to overland? How quickly do those bags get shredded if you are on rough roads with them? Or are those bags more designed for hauling a pile of bricks from Home Depot to your garage, and nothing more. I actually have one installed for heavy tile I used to haul, but one blew years ago and I never thought it useful to repair and put back into service.
 

AlpineAccess

Overlanding is an expensive word for car camping.
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Another newbie question: Could a simple, inexpensive air bag/air lift kit from Air Lift, Firestone, etc, counteract the weight in the rear of the vehicle while loaded up to overland? How quickly do those bags get shredded if you are on rough roads with them? Or are those bags more designed for hauling a pile of bricks from Home Depot to your garage, and nothing more. I actually have one installed for heavy tile I used to haul, but one blew years ago and I never thought it useful to repair and put back into service.

The bags can handle some abuse - an example is that they are often used for people hauling truck bed campers.

I don't think an airbag is going to be a good option for washboard roads though.
 

MongooseGA

Learns things the hard way
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I think you're snipe hunting. For what you want, the best answers have been given- smaller wheel, larger sidewall, less air pressure in them when running rough roads. As you've found, you're kind of fighting yourself for the sake of keeping the dubs on the truck.

In my experience (see sig for suspension and tire details), the biggest factor in a smooth ride hasn't been the suspension, it's been the tires. My tires ride like a dump truck on the highway with 38psi in them, and despite the suspension doing a great job soaking up bigger bumps, the tires transmit every little bump and crack into the chassis. When they're aired down to 15-18 psi however, they make rough trails feel like smooth pavement.

The airlift bags (or similar) are very helpful when loaded up. I use mine if I'm towing my small camper. Off road, with the bags and springs that I have, they will pinch and prevent up-travel if left with much air in them. Others don't have this issue, but I think it has to do with the bag/shock combo you're using. When running trails, even if I'm loaded up, I will take out all air pressure from the bags and turn up the pressure on the shocks.
 
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Joined
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My older brother taught me how to snipe hunt when I was 8 years old - he taught me the paper grocery sack with popcorn inside method. That said, MongooseGA may be right. Sometimes, getting nowhere is getting somewhere, and I'm starting to lean away from pursuing suspension modifications beyond heavier springs to account for added weight. Thanks everyone for your input, opinions, and knowledge. I got what I needed.
 

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