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Bleeding the brakes

Discussion in '80-Series Tech' started by firetruck41, Mar 1, 2004.

  1. firetruck41

    firetruck41

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    So I decided to try to bleed the brakes to replace the old brake fluid. Got some Valvoline Synthetic Brake Fluid and picked up a "one person brake bleeder kit". I started on the rear passenger caliper, you stick the container to the frame above the caliper (it has a magnet), hook up the hose from the caliper to the container, and then losen the bleeder by one or two turns, then go press the brake a few times. It worked like a champ and filled up the catch container. I stopped when I got to minimum on the master cylinder. I tightened the bleeder, removed the container, emptied it, then went to the drivers rear caliper, proceeded to follow the same procedure, however no brake fluid came out!?!? I ended up turning the bleeder screw so far that brake fluid started seeping out around the threads, but it still would not let fluid out of the bleeder like it should. The brake bleeder kit was not clogged. There is no corrosion and the bleeder scrw looks to be intact. I didn't do any of the others 'cause I will be doing the front brakes and birfields very soon and will do it then. The question is, what the heck is going on down there? Any ideas?
     
  2. Riley

    Riley

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    Ben - My bet is that the bleeder screw is clogged. You mentioned that the kit was not clogged but did you check the bleeder screw?

    This is one of the cases where you need 2 guys, one to put his pinky over the hole while the other guy takes the bleeder screw over to the workbench and unclogs it (or replace with a new one).

    my 0.2 cents

    Riley

    edit - I borrowed Semlin's vacuum bleeder kit last weekend and I'm not sure if I buy into these kits. Yours sounds different however I think in both cases you need to make sure no air can enter the tube where it meets the bleeder screw. Great for flushing new brake fluid through but for the final bleed, to remove all air, then I think I'll stick with the typical 2 man method.

    IDoug - I beat you by 2 minutes and 27 seconds. :D and I've my kids to distract me. :rolleyes:
     
  3. IdahoDoug

    IdahoDoug

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    Ben,

    Pull the bleeder screw all the way out, and have something on hand to plug it (not critical, but will reduce the outflow and bubbles you'll have to subsequently bleed out) if possible. Maybe a wad of alumium foil crushed/screwed into the threaded hole?

    Anyhow, you've simply got a clogged bleeder screw. Might be you can simply clean it out with a wire and reuse it. If not, you've got it with you to get the correct size from any auto parts store or the Toyota dealer. You might also step harder on the pedal - you won't hurt anything with this pressure unless you get nutty. If this works, it may blast the bleeder hose right off when the clog lets go, so put newspaper down if it's an issue.

    DougM
     
  4. xl715

    xl715

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    Another trick you could try is loosen the clogged beeder and go slam on the brake pedal REALLY hard, it may blow out the clog. If not, you will have to pull the screw out and clean it with a piece of wire or something. I usally just let the fluid drip out, it only comes out slowly and if you work fast and make sure the resivour is full before you start, won't lose much fluid.
     
  5. firetruck41

    firetruck41

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    Thanks, you guys are quick! I wasn't sure what would happen if I removed the bleeder screw entirely, but now I will try that and see if it is clogged, makes sense that is probably what it is. I initialy tried pressing hard on the brake, figuring it would clear out any clogs, but nothing happened.
     
  6. IdahoDoug

    IdahoDoug

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    With the amount of air you'll likely get in the system now, be sure to heavily bleed this caliper and perhaps use a bit more speed (more rapid pumping) to drive the bubbles all the way out of the lines and the caliper's pistons. Good luck.

    DougM
     
  7. lagwagon

    lagwagon

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    Get a smal drill bit or wire and brakeclean or air to clean the breeder screw. Get a pan to catch fluid. Fill the reservoir and remove the bleeder. By the time you are done cleaning the bleeder you might have clean fluid running through. It is called gravity bleeding and is, I have found to be the best way to install new fluid. As long as the resevoir never goes empty you should not have to pressure bleed when you are done. I never have. There is also less risk of ruining your Master cylinder like slamming on the pedal. I believe the theory if you push the piston in the master past where it normally goes every time you drive you have the possibility of damage to the master cylinder.
     
  8. Gumby

    Gumby Supamod Staff Member s-Moderator

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    There is a possibility that it's not your bleeder. You might have a stuck proportioning valve as well.