Anyone wish for a Manual Transmission for the LC300? (1 Viewer)

afgman786

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Paddles would be nice and the ability to actually select a gear for hold (within reason), vs just selecting the highest gear it can use..
The brand new highlander offers this. Had a loaner the other day, and when I went into manual mode it was a true manual. Wouldn't let me upshift to 2nd when at a light, and would lug before downshift if I was in too high a gear. Maybe they'll pass this along to the next gen of lc
 

ga12r1

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I enjoy wheeling and selecting the gears in sport mode. I would not want to wheel with a manual. Give me an auto with selectable gears. That’s where it’s at.
 

Trukk

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Another manual guy here. My last 3 Cadillac's had manual transmissions (T56, then TR6060, then TR3160). I LOOOOOOVE driving a manual.

Now with that said, I'm not sure the 200 is the correct vehicle for a manual.

I have come to terms, that the days of the manual are at an end. Heck the days of the Internal Combustion Engine are numbered.
 

LBridges

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I've had a variety of manual and automatic cars, pickups and SUVs over the years. The 200, IMO, is best equipped with the auto box.
 
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I'm probably the only, or perhaps one of a handful of guys on this thread with a manual gearbox 200. Mine is a LHD TTD 4.5 sourced from Toyota Gibraltar for use in Angola southern Africa. I had the option of the 4.0 V6 with an autobox, or a 4.5 TTD with an auto or manual gearbox. I chose the manual because I work primarily in remote regions. My previous 24v 4.2 TD 80 series with a manual once let me down deep in the bush of Zambia. The alternator was starting to go, and wasn't charging the battery sufficiently at the slow speeds I was traveling. I had to have a donkey pull start to get her going in the sand. Had it been an autobox, I would've been stuffed. I've never known anyone to have problems with the Toyota autoboxes, but alternators, batteries and starter motors are a different thing. I suppose in N. America, if any of those goes bad, you can call your buddy, AAA or make a plan to get towed and get a replacement part or battery to sort you out. Out in remote Africa, the insurance of being able to push/pull start your vehicle is important. So, IMO, the manual gearbox has its place. I don't think that place is in N. America.

All that being said, I'm now looking at getting a 79 series double cab with the 4.5 V8 TD. If I had that cruiser first, and my 200 second, I'd have purchased the 200 with an autobox. My manual 200 didn't even come with cruise control... :rolleyes:
 

bloc

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I'm probably the only, or perhaps one of a handful of guys on this thread with a manual gearbox 200. Mine is a LHD TTD 4.5 sourced from Toyota Gibraltar for use in Angola southern Africa. I had the option of the 4.0 V6 with an autobox, or a 4.5 TTD with an auto or manual gearbox. I chose the manual because I work primarily in remote regions. My previous 24v 4.2 TD 80 series with a manual once let me down deep in the bush of Zambia. The alternator was starting to go, and wasn't charging the battery sufficiently at the slow speeds I was traveling. I had to have a donkey pull start to get her going in the sand. Had it been an autobox, I would've been stuffed. I've never known anyone to have problems with the Toyota autoboxes, but alternators, batteries and starter motors are a different thing. I suppose in N. America, if any of those goes bad, you can call your buddy, AAA or make a plan to get towed and get a replacement part or battery to sort you out. Out in remote Africa, the insurance of being able to push/pull start your vehicle is important. So, IMO, the manual gearbox has its place. I don't think that place is in N. America.

All that being said, I'm now looking at getting a 79 series double cab with the 4.5 V8 TD. If I had that cruiser first, and my 200 second, I'd have purchased the 200 with an autobox. My manual 200 didn't even come with cruise control... :rolleyes:
This exactly. There is a time and place that a manual is easily the logical direction. In North America, which obviously dominates the discussion on this board, the manual would be a niche thing appreciated by a very small minority of people willing and able to buy one new. Which is a little bit of a bummer, as options are good. But I understand why they don’t offer it here and don’t fault them for it.
 
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No actually.

i drove manual transmission vehicles almost exclusively from 1976 until 2003. my 2003 4Runner was the first vehicle with an automatic transmission that I purchased. For off-road driving, an automatic is simply easier. If you have to stop on a hill and then start up again, an automatic is easier. It is easier to ease over an obstacle with a little left foot braking. It is easier to start up in sand without spinning tires and digging in. The only thing a manual transmission does better is more engine braking going down hill. But given the power and fade resistance of modern brakes, I don’t see the big deal — lo range, put the auto in 1, and use the brake pedal.

The commute that I had pre-COVID-19 was 15 miles and took about one hour. Yes, I’ve done stop and go driving in manuals (including the exact same commute). It is easier in an automatic. I would particularly like brake hold and all speed radar cruise, but I’m 5 years from retirement and who knows whether I’ll be going back to the office.
 

ga12r1

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No actually.

i drove manual transmission vehicles almost exclusively from 1976 until 2003. my 2003 4Runner was the first vehicle with an automatic transmission that I purchased. For off-road driving, an automatic is simply easier. If you have to stop on a hill and then start up again, an automatic is easier. It is easier to ease over an obstacle with a little left foot braking. It is easier to start up in sand without spinning tires and digging in. The only thing a manual transmission does better is more engine braking going down hill. But given the power and fade resistance of modern brakes, I don’t see the big deal — lo range, put the auto in 1, and use the brake pedal.

The commute that I had pre-COVID-19 was 15 miles and took about one hour. Yes, I’ve done stop and go driving in manuals (including the exact same commute). It is easier in an automatic. I would particularly like brake hold and all speed radar cruise, but I’m 5 years from retirement and who knows whether I’ll be going back to the office.
For real. I couldn’t imagine running Poison Spider with a manual 200. No thanks.
 
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According to car max, 96% of Americans drive automatics. Putting a manual in a $87,000 SUV for US consumption would probably make Toyota fire their entire US executive management.
 

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