Help - Is there turbo in my Prado? (1 Viewer)

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Sep 2, 2005
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I recently bought a 1999 Toyota Land Cruiser Prado TX model.
It bears a 2900cc diesel engine and automatic transmission.

I daily experience a very rugged ride and no immediate pick up. When I recently drove my friend's, I could find lot of difference in pick up.

I doubt the turbo, if it present in my model or what should I check initially?
 

brownbear

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post your vin number so guys here can see what enigne you have, to say if it is a turbo or not.

can you not see the turbo under the hood? post a picture of your engine compartment.

possible your turbo is not closing the wastegate, resulting in low boost.
 
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Sep 2, 2005
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I have a turbo because I have noticed the inlets for air on the bonnet.

What should I check initially?
 
Joined
Sep 27, 2005
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Sunshine Coast Australia
Just because you have inlets in the bonnet doesnt mean you have a turbo. The air inlets from the front of the bonnet that discharge down into the intercooler. As "harveya" says you should have the IKZTE engine which is classed as a 3.0 Turbo Diesel with intercooler. The turbo is located down low on the left hand side of the engine as you stand in front of the vehicle. If you want a good look at it you will have to crawl under the truck aand look up into the engine bay. The intercooler is the big silver radiator looking thing that sits on top of your engine. It cools the air being forced into the engine by the turbo. Becuse one side of the turbo is using exhaust gas to turn it, the turbo unit gets very bloody hot, and this causes the inlet air to become heated. This is not desireable because it reduces the ability of the combustion gases to expand. The cooler the air the more dense it will be and therefore the bigger the bang you get when the fuel ignites which = more go power. Denso has now developed an air to water intercooler which works better that the air-to-air system on the Prado. But not really worth the dollars to change it over.

If you new to 4x4's as you indicate then I suggest you purchase a new workshop manual. Max Ellery as only recently released a publication that covers the Prado and all the engine variations in one complete workshop manual. Go to your local Repco and get them to order it for you and don't let them tell you that it doesn't exist, it is a very new manual and their price list may not show it yet. For $55.00 AUD it is a cheap source of information.

http://www.ellery.com.au/T034.html

Hope some of this helps.

Regards
D.T.
 

denis

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Deep Thought said:
Becuse one side of the turbo is using exhaust gas to turn it, the turbo unit gets very bloody hot, and this causes the inlet air to become heated.

nope, the inlet air gets hot because the compression is way too quick to not do so.
 
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Ah, I think you've got me there denis I've done some further research.

Although air contact with the turbo body does increase inlet air temperature by a percentage the majority of heat gain to the inlet air is from the turbo compressing the fresh air. i.e. when work is done on a gas to compress it (air is a gas) the gas will become heated.

It's good that we can pick one another up on our knowledge errors we all become much better informed that way. Thanks denis.

Regards
D.T.
 

Tapage

Club 4X4 Panamá
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harveya said:
Your's should be the 1KZTE engine (3 litre less a bit turbo diesel).

Check the compression, timing, EGR and fuel pump delivery first.
5L engine is an option in some basic specs Prado here in Panamá.
 

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