CO2 Regulators (1 Viewer)

Brentbba

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Pros, Cons of Static regulators vs adjustable regulators?

Post um up outside of the fact that static are cheaper. :flipoff2:
 
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fixed 150psi regulators are good for airing up. Adj are good if you need to run air tools or other things.
 

Brentbba

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The 'other' I'm thinking about include my Airlift airbags and bicycle tires when our scout troop takes bike trips. Last year we were luck that one of the dad's had some of that can tire sealant stuff that got us buy (read - I need another excuse for the wife here!). Concerned that a static 150psi would just be to much for the airbags as they don't need but a quick burst to get them from the 15-20 I run for daily driving to the 30psi max I use when towing.
 
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Brent,
With either the static or the adjustable you will want to use a tyre inflator with a gauge. The only difference is the adjustable will let you fill "slower" thus potentially avoid overinflating as in the case of the airbags. If you select a static you will just give it a quick burst of air and check the pressure. If you released too much then deflate. Same with bike tyres. Some air tools are not designed to run above 90 psi but I haven't heard of damage from higher pressures. (That doesn't mean much because I don't hear or know much about air tools in general.)

As FirstToy mentioned, the adjustable regulator will let you select a flow rate for things like air tools or an air nozzle to blow dust off a keyboard or something. In those cases you may only want 50 psi for a sustained period of time (several seconds.)

I have both a static (150) and an adjustable. I have used the 150psi static regulator to fill bike tyres; no problem except my PowerTank gauge only goes to 60psi and some of the road bike tyres call for a 100psi inflation.

-B-
 
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I have a CO2 tank for another project and will use it for OBA. THe powertank is what size?? Are they in pounds, i.e. a 10# tank. I have a tank about that size, small and compact
 

Cruiserdrew

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Brent-It's hard to beat a static regulator for filling tires. They have very fast flow rates so filling tires is a breeze. Make sure you get a non-freezing one. Most of the ones made for beverages are built for slow flow and will freeze under high flow conditions. I got a really nice regulator from Cramer-Decker which is down there in South California where you live.
 

cruiseroutfit

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Mine is adjustable... but I have never turned it down... just be careful filling bike tires, etc :D
 
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Brent simply stated:
I figure if I have CO2 then why limite myself to its uses. Paid a few bucks more got the adjustable regulator and not only can I air up tires, but run air tools and air lockers (if need be) off the tank Ian only runs his off his CO2.
Adjustable is they way to go.

Sam
 
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Or, you could use your cylinder valve to regulate flow, ie crack it for slower flow if your just wanting to do air bags or bike tires. Another alternate would be a ball valve with pressure gauge down line.
 
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informationjunky said:
Or, you could use your cylinder valve to regulate flow, ie crack it for slower flow if your just wanting to do air bags or bike tires. Another alternate would be a ball valve with pressure gauge down line.
I don't think it's a good idea to try to use the cylinder valve for regulation - you could get a freeze at the outlet. There are airline regulators made that might work but I've never heard of one that was designed for CO2 cold. Again, a freezup. That stuff is C-O-L-D....brrrrr.
 

Brentbba

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I've got two very good Milton air chucks, both with guages on them. That would do the trick as B describes above.
 

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