clinometer (1 Viewer)

Joined
Dec 13, 2012
Messages
945
Location
Meridian Idaho
2 Question:
1. do you use clinometer when you go crawling ?
2. where do you mount it?

I was looking all over the dashboard to mount it, found the spot - seems to be good, not on the way to anything and almost in the middle on the car work well.
IMG_0900.JPG
IMG_0899.JPG
 

UnderDawg

Wannabe welder
Joined
Feb 17, 2013
Messages
733
Looks cool.. to bad about the jeep pic. Would be cooler with an old 40 on it. Where did you get it?
 

NLXTACY

Wits' End
Supporting Vendor
Joined
Dec 7, 2007
Messages
26,789
Location
West Hills, CA
I've always felt that these things' usefulness changed with your CoG. What difference does that degree matter if you lift it 4"? What if you are carrying a bunch on your roof? Just seemed pointless but maybe I'm missing the point, I dunno. I suppose if I really wanted to know I'd use the free iPhone level app.
 
Joined
Jul 20, 2014
Messages
445
The question is, how do you set a baseline for the clinometer to know when too much is too much, without going over so to speak?
 

NLXTACY

Wits' End
Supporting Vendor
Joined
Dec 7, 2007
Messages
26,789
Location
West Hills, CA
The question is, how do you set a baseline for the clinometer to know when too much is too much, without going over so to speak?

You first have to know your final lift height and tire size. Then you have to have all of your gear situated. Then go to the scales and see your weight bias, then....
 

retrofive

SILVER Star
Joined
Jan 6, 2008
Messages
15,226
Location
so. oregon
I've always felt that these things' usefulness changed with your CoG. What difference does that degree matter if you lift it 4"? What if you are carrying a bunch on your roof? Just seemed pointless but maybe I'm missing the point, I dunno. I suppose if I really wanted to know I'd use the free iPhone level app.
It's the calibration that is a bitch with them. Gotta watch and flop your rig to know where to mark the spot. :doh:
 
Joined
Mar 6, 2009
Messages
1,810
Location
Between pixels
It seems the pucker factor always kicks in before you reach any critical angle (at least from my experience). I am always amazed when I get out and look at my vehicle when I think I'm about to tip to only see it at a mild angle. Typically, the military requires all wheeled vehicles to maintain a static side slope angle of 30 degrees. I'm sure for most of us, we should have no problem maintaining that. The real problem occurs when one wheel enters a hole or hits a bump. Based on some CoG testing we did on the Mercedes-Benz G-Wagon (same wheel base as ours and similar curb weight) I would guess that the CoG (vertical) is somewhere between the bottom of the door and bottom of the window on the drivers/ front pass door, and biased towards the rear edge of the drivers/ front pass door (horizontal).
 

NLXTACY

Wits' End
Supporting Vendor
Joined
Dec 7, 2007
Messages
26,789
Location
West Hills, CA
It's not just when one wheel hits a hole as much as which direction the wheel is pointed. Turned the wrong direction and you can get floppy.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top Bottom