Any thoughts on this bit socket for the front diff drain plug?

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I was reading around that the front diff drain plug is common to strip when removing with a 10mm hex bit socket.

There is a lot of hype around lately with MAC Tools’ new RBRT line of bit sockets. They are preaching to use them the first time and every time, not as extractors.

I wonder if it’s worth the $14 to buy the 10mm alone for this sort of thing. They claim they’ve engineered the RBRT design to bite much better than a traditional hex bit.

 
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Interesting. I had a lot of trouble with the front diff drain, as many others have. I had to weld on a nut. At that change I put on the Lexus 'bolt head' plug, which a shop got to use when they did the gears update. When I went to change the break-in oil, I had to weld a nut on the 'bolt head' plug too. I put that welded up plug back on . . . won't be welding again . . .

For $14 it seems worth a try. If you're not the very first to use it, it is likely that the plug will be buggered.
 
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Interesting. I had a lot of trouble with the front diff drain, as many others have. I had to weld on a nut. At that change I put on the Lexus 'bolt head' plug, which a shop got to use when they did the gears update. When I went to change the break-in oil, I had to weld a nut on the 'bolt head' plug too. I put that welded up plug back on . . . won't be welding again . . .

For $14 it seems worth a try. If you're not the very first to use it, it is likely that the plug will be buggered.
I haven’t looked yet but I’m sure I’m the first. It’s a one-owner 2013 with 98k miles. The previous owner maintained it strictly at the dealer. Only by the book stuff for ‘normal driving’ so 10k oil change intervals, air filters and such when required by the book. The diffs, t-case and trans isn’t called to be changed for the lifetime under ‘normal driving’ conditions. I’m going to switch to 5k OCI’s as well as change all of the other fluids. It’s going to be $700 or so in parts but that’s what it takes to do it all and start fresh with everything.
 

BuckeyeFan

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I've had good luck with the plugs, I guess, aside from a few scraped knuckles. $14 is cheap compared to the hassle and frustration of a stripped plug, so WTH.

I'm 100% with you on the fluid changing, but I bet you'll be disappointed by how dirty it isn't. I have always replaced the factory magnetic plugs with something bigger (like @bjowett) or stronger like the Dimple plugs.

 

hankinid

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My '13 has the oem hex plug. I diy oil and filter, always use a fresh copper gasket. I anneal it to make it dead soft instead of 1/4-soft. I also found a 15/16" 6-point socket is a slightly tighter hold on the plug.
 
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I can offer a couple tips. Front diff, I typically place a brass hammer square on the drain bolt and whack the brass hammer with another hammer. This tends to loosen it up. Then follow up with your 10mm hex but give it a SWIFT push/pull on the ratchet. The trick is being swift, quick, and firm with the action. The 2nd part works well with the rest of the plugs for xcase/rear end. Just make sure the socket is in/on the plug 100%. Fancy MAC socket optional lol.
 
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Used a hex bit with a regular ratchet on my '10 a week or two ago. Scraped some knuckles when it broke loose so went with a breaker bar for the rest. Didn't have any issues, mines lived in south texas its entire life so ymmv.
 
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Mine was already buggered from prior service. I didn't even need to put the hex in it to know it was stripped. How the tech before put that in with good conscience I will never understand. Oh well, I got a toaster welder out of it. . .
 
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I can offer a couple tips. Front diff, I typically place a brass hammer square on the drain bolt and whack the brass hammer with another hammer. This tends to loosen it up. Then follow up with your 10mm hex but give it a SWIFT push/pull on the ratchet. The trick is being swift, quick, and firm with the action. The 2nd part works well with the rest of the plugs for xcase/rear end. Just make sure the socket is in/on the plug 100%. Fancy MAC socket optional lol.
Thanks. I looked under it this evening and the plugs are all virgin. Factory fills. I may try that. Or perhaps this would be a perfect scenario to try the RBRT bit socket. I'm a tool nut and the RBRT stuff has really been intriguing me even though I'm mainly a snap on guy. The 10mm hex is pretty stout but damn that sealing face of the drain bolt is huge!
 

bloc

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Before you open it up have the Lexus IS part on hand if you don’t already. It has a 14mm external hex and is much less likely to strip in the future
 
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I was reading around that the front diff drain plug is common to strip when removing with a 10mm hex bit socket.

There is a lot of hype around lately with MAC Tools’ new RBRT line of bit sockets. They are preaching to use them the first time and every time, not as extractors.

I wonder if it’s worth the $14 to buy the 10mm alone for this sort of thing. They claim they’ve engineered the RBRT design to bite much better than a traditional hex bit.

s-l64.jpg
 

bloc

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It’s also available for $36 in the US. Still, that’s a lot of money for a tool that is basically just a high quality 10mm hex bit. Maybe cheaper than welding but I don’t see how it avoids stripping the original plug.
 
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It’s also available for $36 in the US. Still, that’s a lot of money for a tool that is basically just a high quality 10mm hex bit. Maybe cheaper than welding but I don’t see how it avoids stripping the original plug.
Best tool ever every Toyota land cruiser owner should have one . Worth it. Welding a nut 😏
It’s also available for $36 in the US. Still, that’s a lot of money for a tool that is basically just a high quality 10mm hex bit. Maybe cheaper than welding but I don’t see how it avoids stripping the original plug.
Best tool ever every Toyota land cruiser owner should have this tool. Plus compact if using torque wrench as you know not much room where the plug is.
 

TeCKis300

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I was reading around that the front diff drain plug is common to strip when removing with a 10mm hex bit socket.

There is a lot of hype around lately with MAC Tools’ new RBRT line of bit sockets. They are preaching to use them the first time and every time, not as extractors.

I wonder if it’s worth the $14 to buy the 10mm alone for this sort of thing. They claim they’ve engineered the RBRT design to bite much better than a traditional hex bit.

Ooo, shiney! Thanks for sharing this. I'm a sucker for tools that produce results.

If a normal tool doesn't get you there, than it's not the right tool for the job. Without the right tool, you'll waste more time trying to compensate. Should have invested and bought the right tool for the job to begin with and this looks like the ticket.

I was intrigued and did more research on this RBRT line. Fantastic stuff.

 
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Good thread. I had read about the troubles some have had removing this drain plug before doing my fluids and was dreading having to tackle it on my car. To my surprise, using the correct size, high quality hex socket, the thing came right out. Granted, the drain plug itself was in great shape. I think most of the issues come in when folks try to use poor fitting tools, the car is from the rust belt, someone has hacked at the plug before and chewed up the inside, or it was severely overtorqued the last time it was installed. If none of these apply to you (hopefully!), i would think you won't have a problem.

A good set of high quality torx and hex sockets is something everyone should invest in if you're doing your own work.
 

bloc

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Many people have reported it being on extremely tight from the first factory fill. It likely has something to do with the large thread and copper gasket size despite the low torque value and ability of a 10mm hex. It seems this setup seizes in some way. This also helps explain why welding a nut on often drastically reduces the torque required to get it loose once everything is cool.

Either way it is common enough to plan ahead for trouble, and hopefully people get surprised for the better like you were @lawrence1.
 
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