Removing a broken, rusted rear shock (1 Viewer)

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Apr 1, 2020
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Baton Rouge, LA
I ordered new rear shocks for the 2000 LC I bought since one of them was cracked in half at the time of purchase. I was able to remove the portion of the shock shown in the photo, but I'm not sure how to go about getting the top bolt off at this point. Any thoughts on where I might start? Am I going to need to drill a new hole through the mounting racket at the top?
IMG_1264.JPG
 
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Dec 5, 2016
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DC
At this point, you'll need to take a sawzall and cut off whatever you can, then just try to separate the bottom from the top bolt. Look at your new shock, see where the ridge is for the big washer, if it's broken above that then you should be able to just push it on through.
 
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Sep 2, 2018
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Utah
You can also cut a hole in the floor of the cruiser to get a better view of it. A little extreme, but it depends on how much time you want to spend on your back with your arm twisted up in the rear shock area
 
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manchester uk
You can also cut a hole in the floor of the cruiser to get a better view of it. A little extreme, but it depends on how much time you want to spend on your back with your arm twisted up in the rear shock area
Hole in boot (trunk) every time
 
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I would think so. By going in from above like that I could get an electric die grinder on the bolt easily and have it out in 5 minutes.
It really depends on what you have available to you as far as tools. I’ve had my harbor freight die grinder for a while and it’s been very reliable. Used it all over the front end to get bushings out.

I’m not sure you could position the grinder from underneath to get the bolt.
Air die grinders are much smaller but take a TON of air.
 
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Baton Rouge, LA
I would think so. By going in from above like that I could get an electric die grinder on the bolt easily and have it out in 5 minutes.
It really depends on what you have available to you as far as tools. I’ve had my harbor freight die grinder for a while and it’s been very reliable. Used it all over the front end to get bushings out.

I’m not sure you could position the grinder from underneath to get the bolt.
Air die grinders are much smaller but take a TON of air.
Thanks. I have an angle grinder, a Dremel tool, and a reciprocating saw. Also hammers. I suspect I will try from below and if that fails, look to the hole from the back.

You cut the hole with a hole saw? I have those but they are meant for wood.
 

2020 Rocks

SILVER Star
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Thanks. I have an angle grinder, a Dremel tool, and a reciprocating saw. Also hammers. I suspect I will try from below and if that fails, look to the hole from the back.

You cut the hole with a hole saw? I have those but they are meant for wood.
Here is a good thread that should get you started in the right direction....


 
Joined
Oct 10, 2016
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Middle Tennessee
Mine was equally rusted, had to cut it with a sawzall. No need for drilling on the floor, just lift the truck as much as possible, put a couple of good jack stands and take the spare out, you have room to seat under the truck. I'm 6' 4" and did the job seating on the floor under the truck. Not comfortable but better than drilling the trunk.
 

saucebox

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You've got enough rust issues that I'm not sure I'd add another hole to the body, either. But if you do go that route—seeing as you have no choice but to fix the shock—you should be able to patch it up with seam sealer afterwards. I did it similar to @Leandro as well, and while there isn't a ton of access gained, there was enough.
 
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Baton Rouge, LA
You've got enough rust issues that I'm not sure I'd add another hole to the body, either. But if you do go that route—seeing as you have no choice but to fix the shock—you should be able to patch it up with seam sealer afterwards. I did it similar to @Leandro as well, and while there isn't a ton of access gained, there was enough.
Yeah, I am planning to try to see what access I can gain after putting it on jack stands. Hopefully I can get it off with force from below.
 

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