It's not cast iron

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Ok I know it already says somewhere in this thread, but I don't wanna go looking for it. What is the best/fastest way to strip this pan so I can re-season so my wife can use it. Also is it say to use a skillet on a glass top stove? Thanks all!
-Daniel Kent
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I realize this question has been answered already but for the next guy to come along I've had good success with rusty, gunky iron skillets coming clean by putting them in the oven when you turn on the self cleaning option.
Strips that baby clean.

Then you re-season it with your choice of oil (vegetable v/s animal as your case may dictate). Wipe down the whole skillet; top, botton, handle all of it. Making sure you the pan isn't dripping with oil but has a nice sheen and appears well saturated. Then pop in the oven on low heat ~200-250 as you see fit.

Simple stuff. No wire wheeling or harsh chemicals and works like a charm.
 

rusty_tlc

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CS is definitely less heavier than CI...ha...I was almost going to say that one was lighter than the other, but both have some heft to them...
I performed a highly scientific comparison between my steel pan and one of my old restaurant quality non-stick aluminium pans of similar size. Not a huge difference based on hefting one pan in each hand. Probably because any aluminium pan worth using has a steel or copper disk sandwiched in the bottom to spread the heat.
There really is no substitute for mass when it comes to making a pan that has even heat distribution.
 

spressomon

glutton
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Speaking of stainless steel pans :D

Using what I have available to me in this nomadic life I'm living right now and anything iron or steel pans has just not permeated the homes I've been poaching :D...yet ;)

So...when in Rome and given there have been a decent selection of SS pans I've been using them for non-stick performance just like a well seasoned steel or CI pan. The trick is to get the pan really hot before adding, ideally peanut oil. But I get decent results with sunflower/safflower/grape seed oil too.

So after getting the SS pan thoroughly heat soaked/hot add a tablespoon or three, depending upon the diameter of the pan, roll it around and then wipe the excess with a paper towel or suitable facsimile leaving the thinest of hot near smoking oil films on the pan surface. Perfect for everything including any egg dish including frittatas, omelets, shiitake mushrooms, whatever. Frittatas slide right out...with little to no egg residue left in the pan.

But, just like steel, CI or other materials, scratches in the pan from aggressive utensil or scouring pad use will inhibit perfect non-stick performance...
 
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sggoat

 
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only change I would recomm
From Cooks Illustrated (I have a web account):

Published September 1, 2007. From Cook's Illustrated.
How do I take care of my cast-iron cookware?
Routine Maintenance
If you buy a preseasoned pan (and you should), you can use the pan with little fuss.

Don't wash the pan with soap or leave it in the sink to soak. Rinse it out under hot running water, scrubbing with a brush to remove traces of food. (This is easiest if done while the pan is still warm.)
Dry the pan thoroughly and put it back on the burner on low heat until all traces of moisture disappear (this keeps rusting at bay). Put a few drops of vegetable oil in the warm, dry pan and wipe the interior with a wad of paper towels until it is lightly covered with oil. Then, using fresh paper towels, rub more firmly to burnish the surface and remove all excess oil. The pan shouldn't look or feel oily to the touch. Turn off the heat and allow the pan to cool before putting it away.
Heavy-Duty Cleaning
If you have stuck-on food or you've inherited a pan that is rusty or gummy, scrub it with kosher salt.

Pour in vegetable oil to a depth of 1/4 inch, then place the pan on a stove set to medium-low for 5 minutes. Remove pan from heat and add 1/4 cup kosher salt. Using potholder to grip hot handle, use thick cushion of paper towels to scrub pan. Warm oil will loosen food or rust, and kosher salt will have abrading effect. Rinse pan under hot running water, dry well, and repeat, if necessary.
Reseasoning
If cooking acidic foods or improper cleaning has removed the seasoning from your pan, it will look dull, patchy, and dry instead of a smooth, rich black. You need to restore the seasoning. We have found this stovetop method (rather than the usual oven method) to be the most effective way to season a cast-iron pan.

Heat pan over medium-high heat until drop of water evaporates on contact. Wipe inside with wad of paper towels dipped in vegetable oil (hold towels with tongs to protect yourself). Wipe out excess oil and repeat as needed until pan is slick.
only change to this is to use peanut oil---veggie oil will go rancid after a while--
 
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Is there really a $47 quality difference between the $73 DeBuyer Mineral B Element Iron Frypan, 12.6-Inch Round and the $26 Vollrath 58930 Carbon Steel Fry Pan 12 1/2" - French Style? (Links below.) This is a honest question. I’ve been cooking with cast iron for many years and this thread now has me considering augmenting it with steel frying pans. The weight of the DeBuyer is 5.8lbs. No weight is given for the Vollrath, only that it’s 16 gauge. Is 16 gauge too thin for good heat distribution? Should I keep my eye open for a sale on the DeBuyer?

DeBuyer: http://www.amazon.com/DeBuyer-Mineral-Element-Frypan-12-6-Inch/dp/B00462QP1G

Vollrath: Vollrath 58930 Carbon Steel Fry Pan 12 1/2" - French Style
 

Cruiserdrew

On the way there
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The Volrath is much thinner material if it's just 16 ga.

The DeBuyer will last the rest of your life, so assuming you live awhile, it will cost you under $2 per year.

What you really should do is buy both, and post the comparison here.
 
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I've had everything. No really. Lodge, scan pan, Swiss diamond, all clad ,cruisenart, club aluminum, staub, le creuset, and many more. I use Staub as a French oven ( Dutch oven) if camping with a fire I use lodge or Grinwald. My favorite for cooking hot is de buyer. For pans I would use de buyer. For the oven Staub or Romertoff. For pots, all clad. This is my experience over 40+ years of informal cooking. ( I'm not a professional) btw, if you can find some club aluminum at an antique store for cheap, it's better than all clad and about the same as cast iron but heats faster. Grinwald is much thinner than Lodge so heats quicker but is much more fragile than Lodge. Avoid pots ,etc with Teflon including Swiss diamond unless you use them exclusively for pasta or other starches. If price is a major issue Tramontana from Brazil is very good quality.
 

rusty_tlc

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Also not cast iron but hella useful in camp, this takes up almost no space weighs next to nothing and boils water fast. Wether its morning tea or drip coffee, washing up or a campfire cup of coco it is worth having a tea kettle in your kit.
Litech Coffee/Tea Kettle 0.9 L

 

Bogo

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I use a 1.4 liter hard anodized aluminum one by Esbit. It's worked nicely enough that I use it at home for tea making.
 

surfpig

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rusty_tlc

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I ordered a couple of these today. I might retire this ceramic-coated I have pan to the camp box, and/or the Lodge. A little lighter than cast iron, anyway, plus I almost always bring one (or two) dutch ovens and a CI griddle...

:cool:
Mine is still going strong. I've screwed it up and re-seasoned it a couple of times. When I have it right I can cook eggs and flip them with no spatula.
 

GeoRoss

 
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Crap, another kitchen gadget to buy. I just got a small 8" dutch oven for when it is just a couple of people. Now I'm seeing the need for one of these pans.

:lol:
 

Cruiserdrew

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For camp cooking the Lodge is fine. For real cooking, the DeBuyer pans are much better because they are thicker material. I have a 10 inch lodge pan that stays in Alaska for our yearly trip where we cook with it every night. So 14 days of every year it's in daily use!

But back in the world, I recommend you look into the DeBuyer pans. Anyway, a good fry/saute pan is incredibly versatile and useful. You should have one in your camp box for sure. Forget teflon, stainless etc. They don't work well, especially in the camp stove environment.
 

surfpig

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I ended up with not de Buyer, but Matfer Bourgeat (?). nearly identical. The cooking surface on the lodge wasn't to my liking. Getting it seasoned now...
 
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