2F Oil Plug Leak (1 Viewer)

MyToy72

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My 2F just came back from the machine shop after some head and valve work to replace an F that seized the #2 crank bearing. Anyway, this motor is relatively new to me and never had oil in it when I picked it up as it was already removed from the Fj-60 it came out of. The machinest told me that there was a dent at the plug causing the issue. I pulled the pan and this is what it looks like. I can weld this area and grind it flat but the indentation almost looks like it is supposed to be there. Is this normal? Is the plug with the pan the right one?
As always thanks for the help mud!!!

2F Oil Plug-2.jpg


2F oil plug.jpg
 
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I welded mine up and ground it smooth many, many years back. I still get a very slight leak but probably because I didn't do the best welding while the pan was still in place.
 
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If the 2F is like my B-diesel, that indentation occurs on top of a channel Toyota cut in the female thread to provide "complete oil draining".

The indentation forms when the sump plug is over-tightened with a soft washer doing the sealing work.

I must say I've never seen one quite that deep before! So I'm not sure what I'd do to try and fix it. I'd be reluctant to try "welding in situ" for fear of damaging threads, blowing holes, or leaving debris inside. And it looks too deep for sealant to be reliable. So, despite all the work involved, I think I'd remove the sump and bronze-weld or similar before grinding/sanding flat.

Anyway ... here's a photo showing the "complete-drain-channel" -in a the sump of a B-diesel together with matching indentation (arrowed):
SumpPlug1.jpg


:beer:
 
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I'd say the proud spot welds around the thread back up the over-tightened hypothesis. And curiously mine developed the same dent after taking it to a quick-change place. They couldn't get it to stop dribbling, kept tightening, and finally had me drive it out with a trail behind it. That was completely ok with them, luckily I looked underneath before I paid... then they tried to smear some rtv on the plug from the outside while it dripped. I finally got them to pull the plug, use a new washer, and it still took rtv to staunch the bleeding. Next time I changed it, and found out why. Yes, I'm still mad.
 

MyToy72

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Based on the great info you folks have provided I have to agree it was overtightened. I think I am going to try antFj's idea of the epoxy before I weld it. Currently it is off the truck as the engine is out so is worth a shot. If that does not do it then I will try to weld it without damaging the threads etc.... I will post up some pictures when I am done to show you all how I made out. As always, thanks for the help.
 
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Will those three spot weld bumps prevent the crush washer from sealing it too? If so I would just source a new pan. If not I would try welding it. Stuff a wet rag in the hole first and make small welds to build it up. Grind small bits at a time using a wet rag to cool in between. The threads shouldn't have a problem. I would be more worried about the whole pan warping. I don't care for the JB weld idea. If it cracks off then your pouring out oil and risk blowing the motor.
 

Steamer

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Just a thought. What if you found or made a flat washer? With the plug it could be used to shape/mold the epoxy. You'd be sure to get the surface to match the plug and with little to no grinding. A layer of wax paper to keep the washer from sticking. Also if that didn't work, grind off the epoxy and braze the washer on around the outer edge and you'd avoid the threads.
 
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I like weld a washer too. I think i would try that if the pan is already off

Or ...... on the same theme of using a flat-washer (and if you have a torch, silver-solder and flux), neatly silver-solder a moderately-thick flat washer on top of the indentation and spot welds.

:)
 

Ming89FJ62

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I clean the area around the drain plug w/ brake clean then add a thin film of RTV to the gasket - both sides. No issues.
 

MyToy72

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How about bending the thin sheet metal back out to be flat like it came from the factory?
Doug, I did just that the other night but it still seems to leak. I need to try some of the ideas listed. What if I tried to build up some sort of ridge to prevent it from leaking? I also thought about using RTV silicone from the inside since the pan is off.
Just a thought. What if you found or made a flat washer? With the plug it could be used to shape/mold the epoxy. You'd be sure to get the surface to match the plug and with little to no grinding. A layer of wax paper to keep the washer from sticking. Also if that didn't work, grind off the epoxy and braze the washer on around the outer edge and you'd avoid the threads.

As for Soldering a flat washer, are folks saying to just use regular plumbing solder etc... or is there a different method I might not be aware of? I was also going to check with NAPA about a soft gasket of sorts. The one that is on there is hard plastic.

2F oil plug.jpg
 

MyToy72

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Just a thought. What if you found or made a flat washer? With the plug it could be used to shape/mold the epoxy. You'd be sure to get the surface to match the plug and with little to no grinding. A layer of wax paper to keep the washer from sticking. Also if that didn't work, grind off the epoxy and braze the washer on around the outer edge and you'd avoid the threads.
Steamer, When you say braze a washer on are you saying to use a MIG with low heat and feed speed to weld the washer to the bottom of the pan or some different type of welding that you are referring to? Thanks for all the help.
 

N919HJ

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Is it me, or is everyone thinking way to hard about this. :hmm::hmm: :hmm::hmm::hmm::hmm: Yes that's 6 six thinker guys.
 
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Not too sure we are actually thinking but...... try to find an aluminum washer, or fab one yourself from a few folded layers off a coke can. The aluminum will conform better than the hard plastic or copper. Before using it, give another shot at raising the sunken area of the sheet metal. I make my own flat exhaust collector gaskets from aluminum gutter material folded over a layer of gasket material. Then use a hole saw to make the required opening.
 
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I like the idea of just welding a flat washer. Thread the plug bolt about half way on and then weld the washer on, taking your time. Make a spot weld or two, then go drink a beer and come back. You get the idea.
 

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