100 series starter replacement

Flank

American by Birth, Texan by the grace of God.
 
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I dunno about the hundred, but FWIW, I just did my 80 today, and the 100 can't be much harder. Total job, in the beating sun, was about 1.5 hours, not trying to work hard. The 80 starter was 2 electrical contacts and two difficult to get to bolts, and a set of seriously greasy hands.

I don't know about access to the starter on the hundy, but I removed a tire and put the axle on a jack stand and worked through the wheel well and with a creeper underneath.
 

G-Cat

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100 is WAY harder. The starter is located towards the rear in the bottom of the V. I did my 80 in 1 hour. I researched the 100 and ended up paying to have it done. Search the 100 Series forum...I think there is a write-up.

Here it is:

Procedure for replacing 100 series(98 and up) starter contacts

Disconnect the negative battery terminal first!

1. Remove the V-Bank cover held in by 4 10mm bolts.

2. Remove the intake assembly. Remove the cover for the air filter held in by snap clips, unscrew the clamps that attach to the throttle body, and the airbox. Unplug the MAS connector at the airbox, and unscrew the 2 10mm bolts that bolt the intake assembly to the passenger side valve cover. You will also have to detach 3 hoses that go to the intake assembly to remove it. You will also want to remove the air filter, so you use the air filter housing to climb into the car.

3. Now take pictures on all sides of your intake manifold (thanks landtank)! This will help as a reference when you want to put everything back together.

4. Disconnect the accelerator cable. You will need a 14 mm open end wrench on one end, and either another 14mm wrench or some pliers to hole the bolt on the other end. Loosen the bolt on one side, and then you can pull the cable up, and slide the cable off of the housing it connects to.

5. Disconnect the throttle body from the intake manifold. It is held in by 2 12mm bolts and 2 12mm nuts. You may have to tap it a little to loosen it from the intake manifold.

6. Now disconnect all of the hoses that attach to the intake manifold. Just look around the manifold and it is readily apparent which ones you will need to disconnect. The only hidden thing to disconnect is a ground wire that bolts to the back of the manifold. This wire is on the drivers side near a coolant pipe. You will also have to unbolt a wiring assembly from the intake manifold.

7. It would be easiest to remove the fuel pressure regulator from the drivers side fuel rail, but I didn't have the right size wrench, so I just disconnected the fuel hose from the fuel filter and took the hose with the manifold. Warning! Fuel will spill!

8. Once all of the hoses are disconnected, remove the bolts that connect the intake manifold to the block. There are 3 bolts on each side, and 2 nuts on each side. There are none in the back to worry about. You will need a long extension, and the bolts are 12mm. You will also need long needlenose pliers (or a magnetic socket) to pull the bolts off, as they are in a tight space.

9. Now pull the intake manifold off. We did it by one of us climbing into the engine bay, pulling it off, and handing it off to the other guy. Cover the holes on the cylinder head, you don't want any bolts or tools to fall in there!!

10. You will now see the starter sitting on the block. It is held in by 2 14mm mounting bolts which face the back of the car. We removed them by climbing into the engine bay, laying down a towel to rest a knee on and unbolted the bolts. The bolt on the left of the starter is visible, and the one on the right is hidden. The one on the right is a bitch to get to. We got it by removing a 10mm bolt that holds some wiring, moved the wires out of the way, and fit a wrench and extension on the 14mm bolt.

11. You will now need to remove the 12mm bolt that holds the yellow wiring harness to the starter. It is on the back side of the starter also. Then unplug the connector, and remove the bolted down ground wire. You should now be able to pull the starter off of the car.

12. Once the starter is off the rest is easy. You can leave the cylindrical portion of the starter alone, you will unbolt the cover on the short side of the starter with 3 (8mm I believe) bolts. Remove the plunger with spring and set it aside. Now you will see the contacts.

13. Using a 14mm socket, unbolt the contacts on each side (one side at a time) and pay CLOSE attention to the order in which everything was installed. I did this easily by keeping everything together and copying. You will probably see that the contacts are worn down from the plunger hitting it over time. The new contacts will look much thicker than the old ones. Make sure to clean out all of the dust in that housing. Also clean the plunger off too. Make sure to install the spring with the plunger when putting it all back together.

14. Installation is the reverse of removal-don't you hate that?

15. When putting the intake manifold back in, we had to remove the passenger side bracket that gets in the way. It was getting late and we were getting impatient. It also helped to remove a bolt that holds wiring together on the back passenger side, near were the last nut holds down the intake manifold. By moving this wiring just a little, we were able to drop the intake manifold right on.
 

hank14

 
Joined
Nov 26, 2004
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Texas
When I had my 100 I paid to have it done as well...and I like doing maintenance myself like most of you.

If it was an extra vehicle and I had garage space I might tackle it now.
 

G-Cat

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Definitely advantage 80 Series. It's also why I'd recommend replacing the 100 starter with a rebuilt OEM as opposed to replacing the contacts (likely all it needs, just like in an 80) because of all of the labor involved to get to it...it would suck to replace the contacts and then for the plunger to fail.

The argument has gone in circles in the 100 Series forum and it has been decided that there is nowhere else for the starter to go and the labor isn't that bad for a part that lasts 180K+ miles.
 
Joined
Jan 1, 2019
Messages
6
Location
Seattle
After reading this forum and watching several YouTube videos on the subject, I decided to tackle the starter on my 100 series. Other than a new SERP belt and recently added drilled/slotted front rotors and pads, I haven’t had to do much to it. It is a 98 with 100k.
I had to twist the key 22 times in the driveway to start it to move it in the garage.
Beyond tedious, I was able to get the starter out. These tips may help:
Take the throttle body off. 2 bolts and two nuts.
Remove the injector electric plugs - the blue ones. Squeeze the tab and pull from the sides. No screwdriver!!!
The fuel lines were tricky for me. The return is drivers side back of engine and for the supply, I disconnected at the filter by the battery and pulled the hose out with the manifold.
You WILL need a magnetic pickup tool. For the 6 bolts and 4 nuts holding the manifold to the block.
When you see the starter (bittersweet success) there are still two challenges. One is the 14mm bolt you can’t see (looks just like the one you CAN see and the other is the little plastic cap covering the 12mm nut for the positive terminal. It is at the small end of the plastic shroud and just flips up to expose the nut.
It took me about 7 hours with a lot of head scratching and video watching to get it out. I had the new contacts for the starter but then realized the plunger needs replacing and the gasket on the solenoid need replacing too. Today is New Year’s Day and Toyota is closed so it seems this will be a 4 day job, 2 days of wrenching and two days of waiting for parts..
 
Joined
Jan 1, 2019
Messages
6
Location
Seattle
After reading this forum and watching several YouTube videos on the subject, I decided to tackle the starter on my 100 series. Other than a new SERP belt and recently added drilled/slotted front rotors and pads, I haven’t had to do much to it. It is a 98 with 100k.
I had to twist the key 22 times in the driveway to start it to move it in the garage.
Beyond tedious, I was able to get the starter out. These tips may help:
Take the throttle body off. 2 bolts and two nuts.
Remove the injector electric plugs - the blue ones. Squeeze the tab and pull from the sides. No screwdriver!!!
The fuel lines were tricky for me. The return is drivers side back of engine and for the supply, I disconnected at the filter by the battery and pulled the hose out with the manifold.
You WILL need a magnetic pickup tool. For the 6 bolts and 4 nuts holding the manifold to the block.
When you see the starter (bittersweet success) there are still two challenges. One is the 14mm bolt you can’t see (looks just like the one you CAN see and the other is the little plastic cap covering the 12mm nut for the positive terminal. It is at the small end of the plastic shroud and just flips up to expose the nut.
It took me about 7 hours with a lot of head scratching and video watching to get it out. I had the new contacts for the starter but then realized the plunger needs replacing and the gasket on the solenoid need replacing too. Today is New Year’s Day and Toyota is closed so it seems this will be a 4 day job, 2 days of wrenching and two days of waiting for parts..
EC809A14-DD4E-4900-9B97-83E866546C6E.jpeg


D27CD9B9-2978-41CF-968A-6AE10B8ECDF2.jpeg


1EFA4531-C535-4E4B-98A8-E4CAD903B0D1.jpeg


7A5AE1BF-19A1-4610-9B89-5D1897A552CF.jpeg


2B0C07BE-C6C1-4BE4-927B-6304C6510E15.jpeg
 
Joined
Jan 1, 2019
Messages
6
Location
Seattle
A few more photos
After reading this forum and watching several YouTube videos on the subject, I decided to tackle the starter on my 100 series. Other than a new SERP belt and recently added drilled/slotted front rotors and pads, I haven’t had to do much to it. It is a 98 with 100k.
I had to twist the key 22 times in the driveway to start it to move it in the garage.
Beyond tedious, I was able to get the starter out. These tips may help:
Take the throttle body off. 2 bolts and two nuts.
Remove the injector electric plugs - the blue ones. Squeeze the tab and pull from the sides. No screwdriver!!!
The fuel lines were tricky for me. The return is drivers side back of engine and for the supply, I disconnected at the filter by the battery and pulled the hose out with the manifold.
You WILL need a magnetic pickup tool. For the 6 bolts and 4 nuts holding the manifold to the block.
When you see the starter (bittersweet success) there are still two challenges. One is the 14mm bolt you can’t see (looks just like the one you CAN see and the other is the little plastic cap covering the 12mm nut for the positive terminal. It is at the small end of the plastic shroud and just flips up to expose the nut.
It took me about 7 hours with a lot of head scratching and video watching to get it out. I had the new contacts for the starter but then realized the plunger needs replacing and the gasket on the solenoid need replacing too. Today is New Year’s Day and Toyota is closed so it seems this will be a 4 day job, 2 days of wrenching and two days of waiting for parts..
6FDAEB28-5B3F-4D63-9E26-E4BA3EF2A2F5.jpeg


9E9EF8D0-2C07-497E-A61A-AC5AB359CAE5.jpeg


218A857C-9A46-48C3-B7BD-EC92351AA28C.jpeg


0D43B0F9-3212-45CC-86E6-303AB400F335.jpeg


FCFEFC4E-3BED-48B6-8760-BC35FED3DBBE.jpeg
 
Joined
Jan 1, 2019
Messages
6
Location
Seattle
Just to clarify, the 7 hours was total time for all removal effort.

A deep socket on the second starter nut fit perfect.

A few more pictures:

45491A92-267F-420F-AE21-8FB629FED4C4.jpeg


D717C5A1-1654-497C-9475-47C29C3BF5D2.jpeg
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
Seattle
Yes, now that I have done it, it would be much easier the best time. Make sure you have a reman Denso on hand and two new intake gaskets.
Only took 2.5 hours to put back together. Lots of vacuuming and wiping of surfaces first. Fish that loose fuel line the wires and hoses first otherwise it will not drop on to the studs. A little awkward with one person but doable.
Starts like a champ now.
 

chris777

TLCA member #12444
 
Joined
Mar 17, 2005
Messages
615
Location
Dallas, TX
I have read, in the iH8mud series 200 forum, on another thread, that the replacement starter is smaller and is easier to replace. Any confirmf this?
 
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