safety ideas

Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
5,175
Location
Lemoore, CA (south of Fresno) / Cortes Island, B.C
There was some talk at the Inspection last weekend about a possible addendum to club rig requirements to include a vehicle spill kit. I think this is a good idea and we should discuss possibly making this a rig requirement at our next meeting.
Until then, I have made a sample “Spill Kit” that you can make at home. I believe all the tools can be found at Home Depot and your local grocers. My goal was to create a kit that could be stored together and take up a minimal amount of space. This kit uses a 5 gallon bucket with a lid to hold everything and is used to dispose of the fluids after clean up, but some type of box or bag that is sealable could be used instead.
Homemade Vehicle Spill Kit contains:
1 5gal. painters bucket with sealable lid (Everything should fit into this bucket) Home Depot Orange would be great
4 large ultra disposal absorbent bed pads
1 5-10lb bag (3 gallons of kitty litter absorbs about 1 gal of liquid)
1 pr Plastic, Chemical Resistant Safety Goggles
2 pr Neoprene on Latex gloves
3 18 gallon Disposal Trash Bags with tie wrap

1 roll of paper towels
1 Whisk Broom and Dustpan

1 can brake cleaner (to clean tools with, not for the spill)
1 Garden shovel (can be replace with a large shovel carried in rig)

1 orange hand cleaner and water to wash hands with

Some premade kits from manufacturers
Del Albright suggests the “Blue Devil Products” for the Trail Pail Emergency Spill Recovery Kits
http://www.bre-products.com/FourWheelKits.html
http://www.absorbentsonline.com/spillkits.htm
 
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Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
5,175
Location
Lemoore, CA (south of Fresno) / Cortes Island, B.C
Safety/Education: Tread Lightly!

A note on Tread Lightly:
Tread Lightly is offering an online Awareness Course on how to follow their basic tenants. The course is fairly elementary, but at the end, you do get to print out a certificate of completion that you can put into your club binder. It would be a good course for members to take as a refresher and for all new members/four wheelers to take before hitting the trail with us. The certificate is also a way for our club to provide evidence that we are dedicated to keeping our natural resources open and accessible to all.
As an added incentive for everyone to take the course, I will ask Jerome how he made the inspection stickers and will make a “Successful Completion of the Tread Lightly Course” type of window sticker to add to your window. Bring your printed completion certificate to the meeting and receive your sticker. (It’s too late to have these done by the April meeting, but I will try to get them for Calico and/or May meeting).
Course Web Addy: Tread Lightly!


EDIT: I found an online sticker company. Should have stickers of completion by the April meeting!
 
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Joined
Oct 16, 2007
Messages
167
Location
TULARE,CA
You can make it a lot smaller and easy to store. I carry two kits and use 1 gallon freezer bags and absorb pads that we use here at the dealership.
I will bring one that came from the rubithon that was approved for the trail and it fits in my glove compartment.
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2007
Messages
1,317
Location
Central CA
A note on Tread Lightly:
Tread Lightly is offering an online Awareness Course on how to follow their basic tenants. The course is fairly elementary, but at the end, you do get to print out a certificate of completion that you can put into your club binder. It would be a good course for members to take as a refresher and for all new members/four wheelers to take before hitting the trail with us. The certificate is also a way for our club to provide evidence that we are dedicated to keeping our natural resources open and accessible to all.
As an added incentive for everyone to take the course, I will ask Jerome how he made the inspection stickers and will make a “Successful Completion of the Tread Lightly Course” type of window sticker to add to your window. Bring your printed completion certificate to the meeting and receive your sticker. (It’s too late to have these done by the April meeting, but I will try to get them for Calico and/or May meeting).
Course Web Addy: Tread Lightly!


EDIT: I found an online sticker company. Should have stickers of completion by the April meeting!

We are not having an April meeting since Calico is that weekend.
 

megolfer

 
 
Joined
Jan 29, 2003
Messages
2,398
Dan unless you are going to buy the stickers, they have not been approved so I would not purchase them. I really dont see a need unless the class was manditory.
 
Joined
Oct 18, 2007
Messages
799
Location
CA
The safety tech inspection stickers were done by us, and ran by the board before being printed
 
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
5,175
Location
Lemoore, CA (south of Fresno) / Cortes Island, B.C
How to Survive Being Lost in the Desert.


When driving through the desert the road seems endless. There is nothing around for miles and miles. Nothing but desert plants, dry sand and heat. If your car should break down, and you find yourself stuck in the desert, there are methods of surviving, until someone stops to help or you are able to reach the next town.
Stay as hydrated as possible before going out. That means water, not beer, not soft drinks. The same goes for what you take with you. Water may not be the most enjoyable drink out there, but every gram of carbohydrates and salts must be compensated
Take along food that packs the most nutrition in the least size and weight. For some, that might be granola bars, while others will swear by pemmican or jerky. Trail mix is a very popular choice. Do your research, experiment beforehand, and be prepared. When wheeled vehicles break down, it's just your two legs and the path to the next town, and you don't want to be carrying anything nonessential.
Wear wicking fabrics with a UPF of at least 30 as a base layer, and take along one warming layer (wool or fleece) and one windbreak layer. Light colors are recommended both for reflecting (rather than absorbing) light and its associated heat, and in order to be seen at night. While the chances are slim that anyone will stop to help you, at minimum you want to be seen so that you aren't run over. Long sleeves and pant legs, and a broad-brimmed hat, can reduce or eliminate the need for sunblock.
Many deserts are prone to dust storms: take goggles (not mask-type, but rather those that cover each eye individually) and a dust mask, gas mask, bandana, or anything to keep the dust out of your lungs.
Travel at night when possible; (Unless at Calico: Ask Jimmy how he knows) the cooler air enables you to travel farther and faster with minimum danger of heat exhaustion. A headlight and taillight on your head or clothing will minimize danger from traffic.
 
Joined
Sep 3, 2007
Messages
199
Location
Hanford, CA, USA !!!
[ slickrock;How to find North at Night Without Compass (For Jimmy) ]

Unfortunately I did not want to go north, as camp was SOUTH of where I was.

I think a better safety topic would have been FIRE SAFETY.
 

megolfer

 
 
Joined
Jan 29, 2003
Messages
2,398
BUT, if you find north, you can find south or east and west.

I also did not have as much of a fire problem as Odie :). He kept throwing on the logs.

Odie was throwing on logs but you were throwing on the darn pallets. I think thew pallets were the problem.
 

BudKing

 
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2003
Messages
490
[ slickrock;How to find North at Night Without Compass (For Jimmy) ]

Unfortunately I did not want to go north, as camp was SOUTH of where I was.
I don`t think it was a matter of finding North or South
He knew where camp was just could not find the right trail back at night.


I poked funn at Jimmie too but in his defense you get in some of those canyons and they dead end on you!
x2

I also gave Jimmy a hard time about it and I can tell you that it all looks different at night there are a lot of trails and a lot of deadends I`m sure Tom will agree as Cacy with John and myself with Tom were out there at night trying to find them.

Jimmy did just fine he did not panic let us know they were ok and did the smart thing and waited for daylight.
 

megolfer

 
 
Joined
Jan 29, 2003
Messages
2,398
Its crazy out there at night, the trail we were on just kept getting narrower and I didnt think I was going to make it through.
 
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
5,175
Location
Lemoore, CA (south of Fresno) / Cortes Island, B.C
Off Road Safety Gear & Supplies To Take Along


Better safe than sorry. The following safety and recovery equipment will get you out of most predicaments. And, if you're riding with a group, then these items could come from any one of the vehicles in the group; it's not necessary for each and every vehicle to carry it all.
  • Air pump/compressor
  • Axe
  • Blanket
  • Bow saw
  • Bucket
  • Bungee cords
  • Can opener
  • Candles
  • Cell phone and/or CB (Note: steel whip CB antennas can be dangerous out on the trail)
  • Cigarette lighter
  • Coat hanger - don't underestimate the number of uses for the common household coat hanger!
  • Compass/GPS unit (remove GPS below)
  • Duct tape
  • Extra gas - enough for a round trip & in an appropriate container
  • Extra motor oil (1-2 quarts)
  • Fire extinguisher
  • First aid kit (packed in a tight weatherproof container)
  • Flares
  • Flashlight/lantern
  • Flashlight/lantern/spotlight - with extra batteries
  • Food (dehydrated foods take little space and last a long time)
  • GPS unit/compass
  • Hydraulic/hi-lift jack
  • ID card, with emergency phone number contact info & medication/allergy information
  • Jumper cables
  • Leather gloves
  • Maps
  • Mirror
  • Multi-fit hose and a roll of rubber-weld tape - to repair a blown radiator hose
  • Paper towels
  • Pen & paper (a china marker writes on anything!)
  • Radiator Stop Leak / Tank sealant putty
  • Rags
  • Repair manual for your particular vehicle
  • Rope
  • Rubber gloves
  • Shovel
  • Spare clothes
  • Spare key kept on your person
  • T-style lug wrench
  • Tarp (6'x6') - to keep yourself out of the mud and to catch small parts
  • Tire pressure gauge & tire pump; fix a flat
  • Trash bags - heavy duty
  • Water - enough for you (to drink, clean up) and your vehicle (battery, radiator, washer fluid)
  • Waterless hand cleaner
  • Waterproof matches
  • WD-40/lubricant
  • Whistle
  • Winch kit - including straps, snatch block (pulley), shackle
  • Zip ties/cable ties
 
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
5,175
Location
Lemoore, CA (south of Fresno) / Cortes Island, B.C
Right now is the most dangerous time in the mountains.

Trip Planning
Tell a friend or a neighbor where you are going and write it down to
avoid confusion. Give the following details:
Vehicle make and registration number
Destination and intended route
Number/names of passengers
Estimated time of return
Number of vehicles (names of other families)
Whom to contact for assistance in case you are two hoursoverdue.
If you are driving on a graded road or off-road, never go alone orrely on only one vehicle.
Carry maps, even if they are only rough sketches. Get advice and ahand-drawn map from someone who knows the route well, if youhaven't been there before. Ask about land marks such as drums,cables, and tin cans sometimes used to mark routes.
When you return, your first act should be to report your safe returnto the person with whom you left your travel details.


Water - the key to survival
Life expectancy in the desert can be measured by the amount ofwater you drink offset against your sweat rate.
Do not rely on finding water in the desert; in the Middle East onlythe palm plant indicates that water is close at hand.
The recommended adult requirement is 10 liters per person perday. If you are camping, you also have to take water for cookingand washing.
Headache, exhaustion and dizziness are the first signs that thebody is losing too much water. It can happen at any time, evenmeters from your front door.

This Crazy Weather
Conditions are ever changing right now. Pack extra clothes, jackets, gloves, boots, and other items to keep you warm. It could be 90* one day and 35* the next in the mountains.
Pack a sleeping bag or other type of covers to keep you warm at night.
Have fire making equipment. Cover cotton balls in petroleum jelly and keep in a zip-lock bag. These make great fire starts for wet wood (don’t forget something to light the cotton balls).
Keep enough food for to last 3 days in your rig. A protein bar and a scoop of peanut butter is a kings feast when you are hungry and stuck.
 
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