Mig or Tig?

Tony_Farson

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Welp... I got my full profile cage kit from Metaltech. I want the assembly and install to be super clean and strong (of course). Should I ask for tig welding or mig welding?
 

gregnash

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Also TIG is a lot more finicky about the surface cleanliness depending on the materials being welded. MIG will be much easier to learn starting off, could probably even do with stick... But may not be as pretty.
 

Tony_Farson

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Oh I won’t be welding anything structural or safety related with this build! I’ll be taking it to a pro for that type of work. About the only thing I’m willing to attempt is sheet metal/panel repair. :)
 

rusty_tlc

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Oh I won’t be welding anything structural or safety related with this build! I’ll be taking it to a pro for that type of work. About the only thing I’m willing to attempt is sheet metal/panel repair. :)
Good call, the roll cage is one of the things I had done by a shop. I assume you are assembling it then installing so TIG or MIG makes little difference IMHO. TIG is nice for vehicles like the 60, 80 and 100 series where the cage has to be fabbed inside the vehicle. People call it "white glove" welding because it is such a clean process, virtually no spatter.
 

gregnash

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Don't know that I have every witnessed/seen/read-about someone TIG welding body panels?! Super awkward gun placement for body panels especially if they are still on the vehicle, and I thought TIG was finicky when it came to gas as well (with regards to potential wind/breeze). Seems like if you are planning on just body panel work then it is better off for you to go with a MIG machine (get a good powered 220v or convertible machine if you can afford to) than TIG. I guess I always envisioned TIG welding being for pretty stuff that you can do in an isolated and controlled environment (welding on a table for things like exhaust components, small brackets, railings, etc. ).
 

Tony_Farson

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Don't know that I have every witnessed/seen/read-about someone TIG welding body panels?! Super awkward gun placement for body panels especially if they are still on the vehicle, and I thought TIG was finicky when it came to gas as well (with regards to potential wind/breeze). Seems like if you are planning on just body panel work then it is better off for you to go with a MIG machine (get a good powered 220v or convertible machine if you can afford to) than TIG. I guess I always envisioned TIG welding being for pretty stuff that you can do in an isolated and controlled environment (welding on a table for things like exhaust components, small brackets, railings, etc. ).

I think I confused you @gregnash :confused:

The thread is a question on which method I should ask a pro welder/fabricator to use for the assembly of my cage. I will not be attempting any structural or safety welding for a very long time, if ever.

I am planning on using a mig welder to do some or all of my body panel repairs and hole plugging. No tig plans at all for that. I only have access to 120v but the sheet metal isn't very thick, so I think it should get the job done. In addition to the gas tank floor pan, both my outer door sills need to be replaced or patched as does the sill below the tailgate. I also need to decide if I'm going to fill all the holes in the rear quarters, patch the corners completely, or just replace the entire back fender/quarter panels. Sadly, I think I'll have to replace my hood with fiberglass unless I can find someone who can fix the dents. I don't want to use filler like the PO did.


Good call, the roll cage is one of the things I had done by a shop. I assume you are assembling it then installing so TIG or MIG makes little difference IMHO. TIG is nice for vehicles like the 60, 80 and 100 series where the cage has to be fabbed inside the vehicle. People call it "white glove" welding because it is such a clean process, virtually no spatter.
Hey Dan! I plan on taking the 40 to a shop once I have the chassis and tub back together. The cage has frame tie-ins, so I'll need those welded to the chassis. I want the welds on the cage itself to be super clean since they'll be visible all the time and of course as strong as possible since it is supposed to help keep me alive in a rollover and my seats will bolt directly to the integrated seat cradles. I have a couple months before I have to worry about this. I just got excited because the kit finally got delivered.
 

rusty_tlc

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......




Hey Dan! I plan on taking the 40 to a shop once I have the chassis and tub back together. The cage has frame tie-ins, so I'll need those welded to the chassis. I want the welds on the cage itself to be super clean since they'll be visible all the time and of course as strong as possible since it is supposed to help keep me alive in a rollover and my seats will bolt directly to the integrated seat cradles. I have a couple months before I have to worry about this. I just got excited because the kit finally got delivered.
The metal tech cage is very well designed and should fit well if built correctly. I had Samco install mine, the welds are flawless. I took mine down there with the top off. They fabbed the cage in the shop then did the frame tie ins on the truck. A good MIG weld is going to look virtually identical to TIG. IMHO instead of asking which method you should be asking which shop. Samco is good but they are busy and pricey. Eric (Dr Smash) is also good, and busy. Those are the only two shops I have experience with.
 

rusty_tlc

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Don't know that I have every witnessed/seen/read-about someone TIG welding body panels?! Super awkward gun placement for body panels especially if they are still on the vehicle, and I thought TIG was finicky when it came to gas as well (with regards to potential wind/breeze). Seems like if you are planning on just body panel work then it is better off for you to go with a MIG machine (get a good powered 220v or convertible machine if you can afford to) than TIG. I guess I always envisioned TIG welding being for pretty stuff that you can do in an isolated and controlled environment (welding on a table for things like exhaust components, small brackets, railings, etc. ).
TIG is very popular for NASCAR and circle track race car welding, everything from roll cages to frames. I think it would be awesome for body work, ever see the video of a guy TIG welding an aluminium pop can? TIG is also great for fuel cells/tanks because it is such a clean process.
 

Tony_Farson

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The metal tech cage is very well designed and should fit well if built correctly. I had Samco install mine, the welds are flawless. I took mine down there with the top off. They fabbed the cage in the shop then did the frame tie ins on the truck. A good MIG weld is going to look virtually identical to TIG. IMHO instead of asking which method you should be asking which shop. Samco is good but they are busy and pricey. Eric (Dr Smash) is also good, and busy. Those are the only two shops I have experience with.
I had Samco in mind for sure and even more so for me now that I know they've dealt with Metaltech products. Do you recall how much you paid (ballpark). Regarding Dr Smash; I have reached out to Eric several times and never heard back from him. I struggle with bad customer service. I may check out Street to Sand Offroad too. They have good reviews and the guys over there are responsive and pretty nice to work with. I've never had them do any fab, but they've been great for general service, have reasonable prices on parts and whatnot.
 

gregnash

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I think I confused you @gregnash :confused:

The thread is a question on which method I should ask a pro welder/fabricator to use for the assembly of my cage. I will not be attempting any structural or safety welding for a very long time, if ever.

I am planning on using a mig welder to do some or all of my body panel repairs and hole plugging. No tig plans at all for that. I only have access to 120v but the sheet metal isn't very thick, so I think it should get the job done. In addition to the gas tank floor pan, both my outer door sills need to be replaced or patched as does the sill below the tailgate. I also need to decide if I'm going to fill all the holes in the rear quarters, patch the corners completely, or just replace the entire back fender/quarter panels. Sadly, I think I'll have to replace my hood with fiberglass unless I can find someone who can fix the dents. I don't want to use filler like the PO did.
LOL... been a long day this year so easily confused. Had my nose stuck in project documentation and Bill Draft review documentation since December.
 

Tony_Farson

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LOL... been a long day this year so easily confused. Had my nose stuck in project documentation and Bill Draft review documentation since December.
I can relate. I accepted a new position at my current employer and I'm drinking from a firehose right now. I'm not enjoying my job much these days. I need to go hide in the mountains for a bit.
 

rusty_tlc

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I had Samco in mind for sure and even more so for me now that I know they've dealt with Metaltech products. Do you recall how much you paid (ballpark). Regarding Dr Smash; I have reached out to Eric several times and never heard back from him. I struggle with bad customer service. I may check out Street to Sand Offroad too. They have good reviews and the guys over there are responsive and pretty nice to work with. I've never had them do any fab, but they've been great for general service, have reasonable prices on parts and whatnot.
Even if I remembered what I paid Samco it would be irrelevant because it was so long ago and Samco was a start up back then.

Eric is a great guy, the best bet is to stop by his shop and deal with him in person. As far as customer service, he is a lot like Dean at Carson City drive line services. Good work, decent prices but he works on his own timeline. I scheduled my FJ40 tire rack build three months in advance. I was at Erics shop talking about the bumper he built for my FJ60 and he took a break to weld up the neighbor kids broken go cart frame (free of charge).

I think he charges on a sliding scale based on how much he wants to do the job and how much he likes you. He has flat out turned me down for jobs he didn't want to do. I have a feeling he would be less than enthusiastic about a "kit" build.
 

rusty_tlc

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I can relate. I accepted a new position at my current employer and I'm drinking from a firehose right now. I'm not enjoying my job much these days. I need to go hide in the mountains for a bit.
BTDT, I took a position as the QA manager in an ISO 9001 company with zero ISO experience, two months before a re certification audit. Passe that audit and every one since with no problems. You don't have to know what you are doing, you just have to convince people you do until you learn it.
 

gregnash

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Dan I think the phrase you are looking for is "Fake it til you Make it." LOL...
For me, with the ever change landscape of government work, the fact that 90% of what is funded is based on political agenda, who knows who, and who owes who favors, well you can imagine how interesting that makes things. We get so many contracted employees in here that leave within months because they come in all gung-ho trying to get things done and we have to tell them "Wait.... we don't have funding for that yet. We just submitted for approval of the project which then has to go through the budgetary approval process before it actually goes out to RFP. Then once we are there we have to negotiate with the chosen vendor, then submit the proposed cost schedule to the BOE and if it is over $50k for the item/project we have to submit to the IFC asll well for approval. Once that is all done THEN we can start drawing against the project costs and deliverables."

People have laughed then looked at me like "You're serious aren't you?!" when I tell them navigating through state/governmental fiance and fiscal approval is like going through a mine field that is filled with pits, while blind folded, at night.... on a pogo stick.... and while drunk.
 
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