Hundy TRD Supercharger Newbie Guide

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First research all your options:
Ultimately this seems to be your list of options for 100+ HP solutions, just the forced induction unit included for price comparison (exhaust, optional intercoolers, modifed intakes and tranny upgrades not included):

  • AVO Turbo System from Slee = $7400
  • Bullet SC no intercooler no exhaust = $7500
  • TRD Supercharger, used or new off craigslist or ebay = $1500 (good luck) to $4k (They sold brand new back in the day for around $3500)

(the TRD units are notoriously sold with missing pieces, complete units I'm told used to sell for $1500-$2200 a year or two ago, most sales on ebay this year are in excess of $3k)

I chose the TRD route, the rest of the guide assumes you do too.

There is some talk of buying Bullet's intake manifold and putting a new generation Eaton SC on it (Click here for the TS Thread discussing it)
There is also a link here for a Tundra turbo from STS for $4k, but it may mount under the cab and potentially be a target for rocks and other stuff if you are off roading, no idea also whether a skidplate can protect it or how that would work.

There are some companies that will do stroker motors, TTC Performance for one, but price looks like at least $12k.

More reading material:
TS Member having mechanical issues and some discussion around forced induction options
More TS discussions about options for forced induction systems, the question asked is about turbo and supercharger options
STS at one point had a Turbo for the 2UZFE and specifically the Tundra
The OP is talking about dyno tuning and the thread gets into some technical details, the OP says his forced induction unit is a 'ASA TM-15 supercharger(6-7psi boost)'
Here a link to a ih8mud discussion thread about the Bullet supercharger, a newer, and more advanced supercharger for the hundy's
Here is a Lextreme forum member talking about their Bullet SC
Engine performance is discussed in this ih8mud forum thread

Then, get some general understanding of forced induction systems on the Toyota V8 engines, read everything you can here:
TS Forced Induction Thread

If you go with a TRD Superchager, there are some things you should know first:
jbtoy has a good word of caution here:
**Caution to anyone that wants an SC:
1. Do your homework so you know the language and the parts.Too many people buy units with missing parts because the seller and/or buyer have no idea what a complete unit looks like. There is a lot more to the SC, than just the blower.
2. Most units for sale will be used, but, if complete, work great as is. Some folks have rebuilt units before install (I just rebuilt a SC). There is also support in the marketplace
for this. I have not posted all of the resources, but, they are posted in other threads. See that forced induction section, again.
3. Do NOT buy a supercharger if you really want 20+ MPG. Also, the SC requires premium gas, so, if not prepared to do that, just pass on it.
4. If installing a SC is not in your skill set, be advised, some dealers may NOT want to install, but, most competent shops with skilled techs, can handle this just fine.
This is the short version so I can help and avoid writing a novel. Just do some background work and research so you know what you are doing.
***BTW, my supercharger is running fine and strong!!!!

Where and how to buy a TRD Supercharger:
Ebay, search for "4.7 trd supercharger" or combinations of that and try "Toyota" as a keyword as well set an alert and let it run.
Craigslist, search for the "4.7 trd supercharger" or combinations of the above, you're more likely to find a cheaper unit on craigslist, ebay has lots of eyes on it right now, don't ask how I know...
TundraSolutions classifieds, just search for "supercharger" or combinations of "super" and "charger"
TundraSolutions members post up superchargers when they see them, this doesn't help anyone get a better price that's for sure. Check out this forum thread

TRD Supercharger parts:
This is critical, if you don't get all the parts you will more than likely have to get them custom made, call any Toyota dealer and ask for TRD Supercharger parts and you will either hear someone laugh at you or tell you that there are no more TRD superchargers or parts for the 2UZFE engine.
Here is a list of parts you need to install it on a hundy:
All of this is cut and pasted out of the 1998-2002 Land Cruiser/Lexus LX470, 2001-2002 Sequoia, 2000-2002 Tundra installation instruction manual.
Parts list for 1998-2002 Land Cruiser/Lexus LX470, 2001-2002 Sequoia, 2000-2002 Tundra SUPERCHARGER SYSTEM (I didn't include all the bolts, most shops should have them on hand)
o supplied ½” x 17” rubber hose on the oil cooler pipe
o hose clamps
o idler bushing into the backside of the TRD idler pulley
o idler pulley
o water inlet housing bolts
o trd thermostat, and gasket (URD USA TRD Thermostat)
o two TRD supplied relocation brackets and two 6mm bolts to move wire loom housing towards firewall
o throttle cable support bracket 25.4mm (1.0 inch) spacer
o steel fuel return line
o nylon wrap over the passenger-side heater hose
o bypass actuator valve assemble kit
o 9th injector fuel delivery line
o banjo bolt and gaskets to install the 9th injector fuel delivery line
o front fuel pipe
o idler pulley bracket
o supplied drive belt - Tundra trucks use a 2700mm long, 6-rib belt. Sequoia, Land Cruiser and LX470 use a 2630mm long, 6-rib belt.
o 90-degree brass hose fitting for 3/16” x 29” long hose
o bracket to the rearmounting hole on the driver-side wire loom housing
o front wire loom bracket using the TRD intake manifold bolt
o 7/32” x 8” long bypass actuator hose
o 3/16” x 13” long hose from the upper port of the bypass actuator to the steel hose nipple
o two aluminum spacers on the passenger-side cam cover. The spacers will raise the intake air connector off the cam cover. The tall spacer is used for the rear mount. The short spacer is used for the front mount
o 3 ¼” diameter hose for the intake air connector
o TRD Engine Control Unit (ECU)

Hoses, gaskets, and bolts can be gotten fairly easily from any good mechanic shop, the harder pieces to find are the pulleys, bushings, brakets, actuators, spacers, fuel lines and ECU.

More threads on folks trying to find missing parts. Most of the links don't have the parts anymore.

Supercharger Inspection, rebuilds:
If you buy used, I have said before and will say it again, do yourself a favor and have someone like magnacharger.com inspect it and replace or repair any old bearings, or any issues with the unit.

Installation Instructions:
98-02 Gen 1 TRD Supercharger Installation guide or here
03-04 Gen 2 installation guide
TRD ECU Installation guide
Unichip instructions for replacing the TRD piggyback unit
Pully and Shim kit installation guide
TRD Boost Gauge Installation is attached to this post.

Tuning
Life does not end at installation, there seems to be two trains of thoughts on tuning.

1st train of thought is to just stick everything on and let it run.
You have to remember if this is the path you plan to take, and you are using the stock TRD ECU, it's programmed for everything else to be stock. So unless you're running stock size tires, exhaust, intake, etc, you may want to read up on the rest of this if you start having problems or if you are looking for long term reliability.

Many people here that put superchargers on also add headers and large tires. If you add some Doug Thorley headers and put 35's on, your setup isn't what the stock ECU was programmed for and you may start running lean and the higher temps will create issues.
Other common issues with a typical installation include: catalytic converts clogging up, rods getting bent because boost spikes due to the tuning of the above issues, the rods aren't inherently weak, it's other conditions that occur to create a situation where the supercharger's boost fluctuates enough to bend a rod.

2nd train of thought is to tune the supercharger based on the following variables:
• Heat (TRD Superchargers don't use intercoolers, instead the 9th and/or 10th injector uses extra fuel to cool the operation, the general goal for long term reliability and performance is to lower the heat, this may require a lower heat rating spark plug as well such as IK22)
• Air (Different intakes change the dynamic of the system, must be accounted for)
• Fuel (Same as air, any changes to the fuel delivery must be accounted for)
• Tires (if the speedometer signal isn't properly adjusted)
"People put on over-sized and or heavier tires without correcting the Speedometer signal which changes the LOD scaling the TRD piggyback uses for modification of the MAF signals correcting the transition into open loop from closed loop. Problem with this is you're going into 'open loop' later than you should because you're going faster than the speedo is reading/telling you. 200-300 RPM's off a map scale is all it takes because of larger tires without a speedo correction for ignition timing retard, air/fuel ratio changes can throw you into detonation from lean ratios. And most people wouldn't know what damage they were doing until it popped." - jamesjr4750 (and I've seen no one dispute this) link
• Exhuast - More from james in the same post as above: "Putting on different Intakes messing with the MAF sensor in certain cases, headers, mufflers changing the Air/Fuel ratios leading to detonation. My ignition timing changed from a simple muffler swap. Saw this on the OBDII scanner. Loss of power and detonation came back."

For fine tuning to avoid pinging, overheating and added wear and tear some folks monitor their air flow, fuel, heat and boost with a live time scanner to read the OBDII system and datalog for future analysis. More detailed information from jamesjr4750 starts here.

Issues with leaving not tuning the TRD Supercharger on a non stock vehicle:
  • Catalytic Converts plugging up
  • Here's a build thread of someone on TS whose goal was increased performance 1st and reliability 2nd. At 10-12 psi the rods bent. This is more of a story of pushing the limits, but shows what happens when air, heat and fuel are not properly managed.

    There is a dispute about rods in comments on this thread which points to several other threads. I haven't seen any compelling evidence either way as an un biased party to confirm or deny that LX and LC rods are stronger than Tundra rods, either way, I would still think that pushing the boost into the 10+ psi range you are asking for trouble.
 

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I'll dispute the comments from jamesjr4750...for the most part they make no sense:
1) Engine controls don't generally care about vehicle speed at all (zero). They care about rpm and load. Rpm comes from the motor (usually a hall sensor on the flywheel or cam) and load is usually derived from throttle angle. You can't break the fuel map by changing tire size.
2) The engine runs in closed except in three cases:
a) when the cats are cold it runs open loop. (usually only for a few minutes).
b) when the throttle is wide open (WOT)...few people really ever hit WOT for long; you have to have the pedal buried.
c) when a sensor is broken and the ECU cannot do the calculation; e.g. if the O2 sensors go bad or the throttle sensor breaks the ECU gives up and goes back to rpm+fuel map (and if it loses throttle sensor usually can't tell load so goes to failsafe also).

jOnathN said:
I'll dispute the comments from jamesjr4750...for the most part they make no sense:
1) Engine controls don't generally care about vehicle speed at all (zero). They care about rpm and load. Rpm comes from the motor (usually a hall sensor on the flywheel or cam) and load is usually derived from throttle angle. You can't break the fuel map by changing tire size.
2) The engine runs in closed except in three cases:
a) when the cats are cold it runs open loop. (usually only for a few minutes).
b) when the throttle is wide open (WOT)...few people really ever hit WOT for long; you have to have the pedal buried.
c) when a sensor is broken and the ECU cannot do the calculation; e.g. if the O2 sensors go bad or the throttle sensor breaks the ECU gives up and goes back to rpm+fuel map (and if it loses throttle sensor usually can't tell load so goes to failsafe also).

Hit send too early...
Anyway - heat is the likely problem and/or an undersized fuel pump.

Someone who cared could check the fuel injector flow rate and hold times on a *stock* truck to see how loaded they are at full load and go from there. Back of the napkin using this calculator http://www.rceng.com/technical.aspx suggests that the stock injectors are probably ~18lbs/hr (230hp) and the supercharger would need ~30lbs/hr (320hp) at the same pressure. Probably need a bigger fuel pump. Swapping those would eliminate the need for the funky extra injector rig and the extra fuel cooling effect would happen in the cylinder instead of in the blower. Looks like about $200/set of 8.

Any good speed shop can do the math and make a blower work for a v8. Nothing special/unusual about the toyota motor in that regard.
 
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I don't have anything to go on other than a good friend, fellow Cruiserhead, and as of recently a 100 series owner, who works for Toyota corporate. He reached out to the TRD guys and got the skinny on the 4.7 supercharger. It was pulled from market because of the issues on the Tundra and Sequoia motors. There's never been a failure on an LC. The failures occurred at the connecting rods and they chalked it up to the difference in forged vs. cast parts. I've seen the info and posts about the replacement part #'s being the same, but I trust the source of my info.
 
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Taken from a TundraSolutions post by jamesjr:



**Spark Plugs**

Do NOT get the IK22's.
They Suck.
Get the NGK: Iridium BKR7EIX --- Rock Auto has great deals.


***OTHER Parts***


1.) You'll need 8 New Genuine Toyota OEM : Dead Soft Aluminum gaskets for the fuel lines/Banjo Bolt fittings on the fuel rails
And a special one for the Fuel dampener. Get these at the dealership.

2.) Get the Sealant You'll Need for the Water/Coolant housing as well.
Clean up the housing Really Good before applying it.

3.) Be sure you get a NEW OEM Round gasket/Seal for the Water/Coolant Housing.
For...The Round Portion that fits into the crossover section.
You Do Not Want to risk it failing do you?
I had the original coolant housing gasket/seal on a 5K mile unit fail and I had to take the entire supercharger unit off in order to get to it!


Other Parts from Rock Auto .. You'll Need To Order


1.) Get a new Throttle body Gasket. I re-used the stock one and it started leaking oil, not to mention it was probably creating some vacuum loss.

2.) Get the Upper/Lower Fuel Grommets, 2 : O ring gaskets (4 Items Total for each injector) from Rock Auto (Fuel/Air section when looking up your vehicle).... Order 8 of Course.
You will get So Raped at the dealership if you don't.

3.) Getting the Fuel injectors cleaned/flow tested wouldn't hurt as well.
Including the 9th injector on the supercharger.

4.) Ordering up a WIX Fuel Filter wouldn't hurt either.
The engine ran so much better after changing mine.

5.) A new PCV Valve/Grommet (Rock Auto Emission Item) wouldn't hurt as well. I had mine crap out at 90K miles.
The supercharger intake Tract started filling up with oil.
I don't know how many miles are on the Land Cruiser.
Throwing out the experience I had though so you know what to be aware of.

6.) The Intake Manifold Gaskets can be ordered at Rock Auto as well under the Engine section

7.) GET a New TRD : 160 degree thermostat.
Do you want the current one failing ???

8.) Get a new Supercharger Belt as detailed in an earlier thread before.
I listed all the Belts Part numbers Describing the lengths and how they measure the belts.
There is an outside length and an inside length that people get confused with which creates problems for those do didn't pay attention.
 
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Been messing around with different serpentine belts and this is what I'm using now.



image-1169945739.jpg



image-2329988506.jpg
image-1169945739.jpg
image-2329988506.jpg
 

cruiseroutfit

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Pondering...

How many of you installed the SC at higher miles? I.e. I have 165k on my 2UZ, death wish to go installing the SC now?

I'm very familiar with the intricacies of the SC, I've been running one for 6 years on my Tacoma, I actually just pulled it off this weekend for a 130k front end rebuild. That said, it has been on the truck since new... in the Tacoma world most don't recommend installing one on a high mileage motor. Same thought prevail on the 100?
 

lrowe_csp

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Hi Kurt:
I installed an LC version of the TRD SC on my 98K miles 1999 model year 100 series. It is not exactly a high mileage as Toyota Land cruisers go, but it wasn't a new zero mile vehicle either. The SC has been trouble free for the 4000 miles since the install. Much more available torque, and the cruiser feels 500 lbs lighter during acceleration. I haven't noticed any problems related to heat, detonation, difficulty starting or burning oil.
 
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Yah I setup a ebay alert for "4.7 trd supercharger" and there were 3-4 that came up. I ended up paying more than I wanted but I haven't seen any for sale since so I guess that's supply and demand for you.

Seems like the avg price is 1500-2500 depending on if it comes with EVERYTHING (ecu which will set you back $600-$1000 if it's not included) plus the thermostat housing, and all the adjustment brackets which are nearly impossible to find.
 

cruiseroutfit

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Alright guys, I pulled the trigger on a NIB 4.7 Supercharger kit however it is specific to the Tundra, thus the installation kit I'm assuming is Tunrday specific. I've not even had a chance to open the box. I'm just now starting to read all the links and catch up on what I'll need to deal with, but can anyone give me the quick cliff notes version on the Tundra versus 100 Series install fit kit? What do I need to track down to make this thing work?

I realize I'll answer many of these questions when I open the box tomorrow but am up late working on projects and would love to know a little more as I tuck in for the night :D
 

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