Ham rules questions, USA and Canada.

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So I did a few loads to Canada in my 18 wheeler, and in a few spots because of the hills and distance we used Ham with the pilot vehicles. He lent me a handheld so I could communicate with him and make sure we had the all clear to proceed up the road. Seems lots of them there prefer the ham stuff to the CB stuff.
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So after using the handheld and talking to pilot cars a bit, they said you need a license just like in the US. So my question is, do you need to get a license in both countries? Or is there overlap? And is there a limit to how many units you can have depending on your license. This way I can stick a Ham in my 18 wheeler, and carry a handheld, and then get a ham and a couple handhelds for my landcruiser/personal vehicle. Only the 18 wheeler would frequent Canada.

I like the clarity, and it did avoid the static and transmission issues that we get when you have obstacles in the way like CB.
 
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1911

chupacabra
 
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So my question is, do you need to get a license in both countries? Or is there overlap?
You only need one license; with few exceptions it is good the world over.

And is there a limit to how many units you can have depending on your license. This way I can stick a Ham in my 18 wheeler, and carry a handheld, and then get a ham and a couple handhelds for my landcruiser/personal vehicle. Only the 18 wheeler would frequent Canada.
No, there is no limit to the number of radios you can own or operate (within the band privileges of your license class). The license is for you, not the radios per se.

I like the clarity, and it did avoid the static and transmission issues that we get when you have obstacles in the way like CB.
Welcome to the world of amateur radio! Getting your Technician license is easy and your first step. Good luck with it!
 

45Kevin

 
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Your call sign/license is good all over the world. There may be some exceptions.

I recall reading that it is a courtesy to check in with someone (not sure who) when you go to another country and transmit from there with your foreign call sign.Although I have not done that when I am in the States.
 
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Note that Ham Radio is not intended for commercial use. While chit-chat amongst you and your pilots would not be considered commercial use, I suspect that actually coordinating the haul would be... as there's a pecuniary interest there.
 
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I am not to concerned about the legality while coordinating a load since safety is priority number one and I am required by the State/Province/Municipality/Permit to be in radio contact with the pilot! When we comunicated we chose channels that were not being used, to avoid chatter and make sure that no important info was missed and that we were not interfering with others. I just want to have the option of having the CB or ham incase we need to switch for whatever reason. Hauling a 2 lane wide load into residential areas in the hills on 2 lane roads some times for many miles can get intetesting.
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I just figure if I am gonna have some ham equipment I might as well get the license and make sure its all good, especially while crossing borders. Wouldn't want to have an issue with something being considered contraband if I am not licensed to have it. But I appreciate all input related to these matters.
 

Izzyandsue

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One question, did they radio they asked you to use had channels or frequencies? Channels could have been GMRS radios, which come ready and pre-programmed off the shelf, but you still need to get a licence from FCC ($65 now I think) and no exam. Another channels only radio is the commercial ones, like Rugged Radios, which operate in pre-established frequencies and many 4WD clubs are using more because they dont need license, like a walkie talkie.

I am all for amateur license, as a General Class myself, it will give you the most flexibility and can make your trips more interesting by connecting to repeaters along the way, using APRS so others (if you want them to) can track your route, and join local nets while traveling and make connections, specially if you do similar routes. But be careful, you are not supposed to operate on commercial bands with your amateur radio, or use the GMRS bands either.

And just like in the US we have a band plan to be followed by amateur users, Canada has a band plan to be followed when you are there. Of course, radio waves do not recognize borders, but better to know so you dont interfere with the Mounties, eh?

Canadian Amateur Radio Bandplans
 
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Joined
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This is good info there. He just gave me a handheld that had all these knobs and buttons. I have no idea what model it is. Kind of like going from a cellphone Camera to a professional camera. All the buttons and options seem overwhelming at first. That is why I want to learn, and I want to make sure I dont get in any big trouble.
 
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Ok so I took the plunge and bought a starter radio. It has a remote mount faceplate and should be good for a while. It will be a bit before I install it. I still have to figure out one how to mount the antenna, and what kind to get.

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I have my CB antenna on the front bumper, so I would imagine I want to keep this one away from that one. But if I stick it on the rear p/s corner it will be more suceptible to getting hit by branches and such.

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I am not to concerned about the legality while coordinating a load since safety is priority number one and I am required by the State/Province/Municipality/Permit to be in radio contact with the pilot! When we comunicated we chose channels that were not being used, to avoid chatter and make sure that no important info was missed and that we were not interfering with others. I just want to have the option of having the CB or ham incase we need to switch for whatever reason. Hauling a 2 lane wide load into residential areas in the hills on 2 lane roads some times for many miles can get intetesting.
View attachment 1737288
I just figure if I am gonna have some ham equipment I might as well get the license and make sure its all good, especially while crossing borders. Wouldn't want to have an issue with something being considered contraband if I am not licensed to have it. But I appreciate all input related to these matters.
Your Cruiser didn’t even blink pulling that trailer over the border.... did it?! Lol
 
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So I got a handheld for meanwhile for the 18wheeler. So in canada they have to program in the frequencies for you. The local radio shops do all that. But for starters up there, especially on the roads up to Alaska, the vehicles run on the LADD or RR channels. Usually LADD1 or 2 is what I monitor. Here are some of the freqs for up there.
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ok. lots to step through here.

#1. you need an FCC licence for ham radio in the US to operate a ham radio. You'll need a callsign starting with either a K or W for the US.

all others you communicate with on amateur radio must have passed their exam and have callsigns.

#2. It is illegal to operate said radio in Canada or US without callsign and associated license.

#3. Using the amateur radio for big safety hauls or any commercial use is also against regulations. You might have safety related work that requires a non-ham radio. Aircraft control, Coast Guard, are also safety related, and don't rely on ham radio for primary guidance comms.

#4. Just because some other truckers are buying these radios, installing and using them doesn't make them legal.

#5. further information is available here Getting Licensed
 
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ChaseTruck

--
 
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Just curious: the frequencies in the pic don't seem to be part of the Canadian amateur radio band plan - aren't those in commercial bands? Do HAM rules apply here?
 
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in Canada, we use commercial VHF radios for commercial trucking use.

There are logging road channels commonly used here and on the highways. for this, one also needs to be licensed. it used to be a mobile radio paid a license fee of $45CAD/year per radio to Industry Canada, and was granted a frequency, and was permitted to use these road channels ( RR /LADD ). There was no limit of commercial frequencies allowed to be programmed in a licenced mobile radio

a base station or fixed station was $175CAD/year, per programmed channel

This is part of what they mean about "licensed mobiles". If you're doing a wide-load haul into Canada, you should enquire with Industry Canada as to licensing.

Ham radio is no shortcut here.
 
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