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DIY Backup Camera Install 2002 Lexus LX 470 w/ Factory Nav

Discussion in '100-Series Cruisers' started by bludy1, Jul 8, 2015.

  1. bludy1

    bludy1

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    *** I AM NOT A CERTIFIED AUTO MECHANIC, TECHNICIAN, OR ELECTRICAL EXPERT. PROCEED AT YOUR OWN RISK.***

    I have a 2002 Lexus LX 470 with the factory navigation system (integrated climate controls) and 6-disc CD/DVD changer located in the center console. I wanted to install a backup camera that displayed the image on my navigation screen, and later I want to add iPod and Bluetooth integration (which I will also post), but because of the integrated climate control system, replacing the existing head unit was not an option. Finally, after thoroughly researching these issues, I found the components needed to accomplish this and my install was a success.

    Backup Camera ($80.00) - Optix RVC910IR http://www.crutchfield.com/p_074RV910IR/Optix-RVC910IR.html
    Video Interface ($170.00) - Naviks Video Interface http://www.ebay.com/itm/251307661527?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT

    Basically, the Naviks unit allows you to add a video source to be displayed on your nav screen via tapping into your nav ecu (under the front passenger seat), and then you need to lug your camera into the Naviks unit, and wire it according to instructions, which will allow you to see the backup camera image when you shift the vehicle into reverse. When you shift the vehicle out of reverse, the image then reverts to the previous source. Very convenient.


    Prep for Naviks Module Wiring

    1) Locate the vehicle’s navigation unit under the front passenger seat. Move the seat so that it is as far forward and as high up as it can go. Your going to need as much room as possible under there and will likely need to move the seat back and forth throughout this procedure.

    2) Remove the plastic piece that covers the nav unit and the Mark Levinson amplifier (where applicable). It just has 2 plastic flathead screw things to remove.

    3) Unbolt the 4 main bolts (2 front, 2 back) that bolt the nav unit to the floor. For the front two on the glovebox side, I moved the seat all the way back, removed the small pop rivet, and had to make about a 3" incision in the carpet using a utility in order to pull it back far enough to reveal the two bolts.

    4) Remove the two metal bracket pieces that are bolted to the nav unit. There are two small bolts on each side.

    [​IMG]

    5) Once you have the floor bolts removed and the metal brackets removed, move the seat all the way forward again to get better access to the rear of the nav unit.

    6) Disconnect the ground from the vehicle’s battery and step on the break pedal a few times to help drain any remaining current/voltage.

    7) Remove the connected wiing harnesses from the back of the nav unit. None of mine were too stuck in there, I could pretty much wiggle them all free, but be careful since there isn’t too much slack with any of them.


    Naviks Module Wiring

    1) Using the "plug-and-play" harness provided with the Naviks unit, plug the Naviks 10-pin harness where the factory 10-pin harness was, and then connect the factory harness to the Naviks female adapter harness.

    2) Next, you’ll need to power the Naviks unit. Plug the round-plug end of the provided Naviks 12v wire into the Naviks module. This 12v wire has 2 wires, a black one (-) and a black/silver one (+). Using a vampire clip (or something similar), splice the black/silver wire with the grey wire in the factory 18-pin harness that was plugged into the back of the navigation unit.

    [​IMG]

    3) Splice the other black wire with the white/black wire in the factory 18-pin harness (this is the grounding wire), again using a vampire clip or something similar.

    4) For the reverse signal trigger that automatically displays the camera image on the nav screen when the car is shifted into reverse, locate the blue wire coming out of the Naviks unit module and splice it with the red/black wire in the factory 18-pin harness that was plugged into the back of the navigation ecu using a vampire clip or something similar.

    [​IMG]

    5) Splice the red wire (12v) that is attached the Optix video cable with the blue wire coming out of the Naviks unit. I’m not sure what this does, but I know it’s required for the whole setup to work. IMPORTANT - Be sure you know where you are mounting your camera and how you’ll be running the video wire so that you make sure you have the appropriate size hole drilled and so you don’t have to detach this connections and re-splice it (in the interest of saving yourself some time).

    [​IMG]


    Optix Camera installation

    I mounted my camera in the center of the lift gate, just above the license plate. This way I can keep the use of the backup camera help even if the trunk hatch is open. Plus I feel like this Optix camera has a good enough viewing angle, that it’s ok to mount it low. In order to minimize the size of the hole I would need to drill for the video cable, I actually cut the video cable and then spliced it back together, which allowed me just to drill a small 9/64 size hole adjacent to the camera to run the wire. I also drilled pilot holes for the mounting screws.

    To get the video signal from the camera to the Naviks module, I ran the video wire through the tailgate, along the tailgate wiring harness along the driver side, up the driver side rear quarter panel, across the vehicle directly behind the second row (underneath the velcro part of the floor lining), then down the rear passenger side door sill, up to the front passenger seat, and then underneath the front passenger seat bracket.

    1) Remove the interior panel of the lift gate. This is just held in place by several pop rivets lining the perimeter. I used a pop rivet tool, but I’m sure a flathead screw driver would work just as well.

    [​IMG]

    2) Depending on which side of the vehicle you prefer to run the wire, you will need to remove at least one interior rear quarter panel. I removed both initially because I wasn’t sure how much extra slack I’d have with the camera’s video cable and so I wanted to give myself options to run the cable on either side. These panels are primarily fastened with pop rivets, so find a gap where you can carefully wedge a tool to pry part of the panel off, and then you should be able to pop the rest of the panel off with just your hands (using a firm but gentle grip). I also removed the plastic door sill cover for the rear passenger door entrance.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    3) Determine where you want to mount your camera on the lift gate. Hold the camera in that spot and using its bracket as a template mark two spots for pilot holes where the mounting screws will go.

    4) Drill the pilot holes for the mounting screws using an 1/8 in drill bit. Next, wipe clean the area where the camera will be mounted with water and paper towel or an alcohol swab. This will help the adhesive on the back of the camera’s mounting bracket stick better (even though it’s going to be screwed in).

    5) After drilling the pilot holes for the mounting screws, drill a 9/64 in. hole for the camera cable. I drilled mine slightly to the side of where the camera would be mounted so that as little cable showed as possible, but with enough space that the tension from the cable doesn’t affect the camera (by pulling it or making it difficult to mount and move). Since I didn’t want to drill a hole for the camera cable much larger than the cable itself (large enough to compensate the video plug on the end), I simply cut the camera cable, threaded it through the hole, and then carefully spliced it back together.

    [​IMG]


    Optix Camera Wiring

    1) In order to get power to the camera when you shift the vehicle into reverse, I tapped into the power wire from a reverse lamp. It doesn’t matter which side you choose to tap into. I did the passenger side, but I feel like the driver side would make more sense if you run your video cable up the driver side. Remove the metal plate covering the reverse lamp area. There are 3 philips head screws holding each plate in place.

    [​IMG]

    2) Splice the red wire (+) from the camera cable with red/yellow wire in the reverse lamp harness and then splice the black wire (-) from the camera cable with the white/black wire in the reverse lamp harness. You may need to cut the black tape that wraps the factory wiring to the harness to be able to get more slack with each of the wires in order to splice them. After splicing the camera 12v and ground wires, tidy them up to your liking so they don’t rattle around inside the tailgate.

    [​IMG]

    3) Run the camera cable inside and down through the tailgate to the area where the factory wiring bundle exits the tailgate. I drilled a hole through the cap where the factory wires run in order to to pass the camera cable through.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    4) Next, run the camera cable along the factory wiring bundle from the bottom of the tailgate, along the plastic wiring shield, and then through the grommet where the factory wiring bundle enters the rear driver side of the vehicle.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    5) From there, how you run the cable to the naviks unit is your choice. I removed the interior driver side rear quarter and ran the camera cable along the floor of the vehicle, up to the rear seat line (where the carpet is velcro’d), then straight across to the passenger side.

    [​IMG]

    6) Next, remove rear passenger side step panel. Run the camera cable down wheel well along the floor up to the front passenger seat, and then under the passenger seat bracket. You can pull up the carpet along the door sill to run the cable under the carpet to better hide and protect the cable.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    If successful, your final product should be...

    [​IMG]

    And the night view...

    [​IMG]
     
    dmark84, JonD, blklnamru and 7 others like this.
  2. BamaHeel

    BamaHeel Intergalactic Champion

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    Fantastic write up! I would like to do the same but am planning on using a camera that works in conjunction with the license plate lights.
     
  3. re_guderian

    re_guderian SILVER Star

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  4. 2003lx470

    2003lx470

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    Excellent step by step DIY write up!
     
  5. CurbsEnthusiasm

    CurbsEnthusiasm

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    Sweet DIY. I have a dashcam I'm installing first and this reverse cam setup is my next project. Thanks for documenting the procedure!
     
  6. bamabrock

    bamabrock SILVER Star

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    Great writeup and bookmarked for later use!

    One question, did you use the other video in with this module or just use the back up camera feature?
     
  7. bludy1

    bludy1

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    I have not tried using another video-in source, but I believe naviks says it can be done.
     
  8. koich

    koich

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    Great write up! Thank you for the detail.
     
  9. Tim Terry

    Tim Terry

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    Yes indeed a well written article on this and gave me enough information to proceed with this on my 2003 LX470 and it worked a treat.

    I was a little concerned that maybe something may have been slightly different in my car and didnt want to invest in the cost of the Naviks if it didnt work but your article allowed me to check it all out and confidently commit to buy it.

    Somewhat simpler for me as the previous owner had installed an aftermarket rear view mirror type reversing camera which I was really getting annoyed with as it is a small and relatively poor picture quality and straps on over the top of the original mirror, which was very much a compromise as a rear view mirror. The integration is very easy with the Naviks unit and wiring harness adaptor supplied.

    The unit also has a 2nd video input which is selected by the pre-wired switch which comes with the unit and this will be great for a caravan reversing camera when I purchase that in the next year or so. Its great we have these terrific after market solutions to upgrade our vehicles these days.
     
  10. Tim Terry

    Tim Terry

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    Forgot to mention
     
  11. OregonB

    OregonB SILVER Star

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    cool write up, very well done, thanks!
     
  12. blklnamru

    blklnamru

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    [​IMG]

    Nice 993! Turbo/S?
     
  13. bludy1

    bludy1

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    1997 911 Turbo. It is so choice.
     
  14. blklnamru

    blklnamru

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    Sorry for the threadjack, but it so is! Still have in that color combo, the "Kills Bugs Fast" poster :)
     
    bludy1 likes this.
  15. Visceral

    Visceral

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    If you have the means, I highly recommend one.
     
    bludy1 likes this.
  16. Tim Terry

    Tim Terry

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    I bought a Naviks unit after reading this article and installed it in my Lexus LX470 2003 model and your instructions and pictures were great giving me the confidence to fork out for a reasonable expensive item not knowing if was completely applicable to my model. I am in Australia and I have a different sound system to the USA models, so wasn't sure what else may have been different.

    Thanks again for your excellent article it all works perfectly and was pretty easy to do. The other great thing with the Naviks unit is it has the second Video input so I will be able to easily add a camera on a caravan when I buy one in the coming year.

    Cheers

    Tim
     
  17. Parbo

    Parbo

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    The price of the naviks is now $195
     
  18. cwmoser

    cwmoser

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    Ditto. I too want a rear view Camera mounted on my RPOD 180 Travel Trailer - Caravan as you Aussies call them :)

    I currently use a 2.8Ghz Transmitter/Receiver pair to transmit the video from the back of my LX470
    to the front where I have a separate Monitor mounted on the console. Thinking of the Naviks though.
    My thinking is that I can mount a Camera on the rear of my Travel Trailer and wirelessly transmit the video
    to my LX so I can see what is going on behind me when towing. Those Transmitter/Receiver pairs
    are only $12 on Amazon.