Builds Body work - fixing my '79 floors and other stuff (2 Viewers)

MOTOV8R

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Initially this was a thread for getting some advice on body work, but I decided to keep posting my progress pictures here as well. I am replacing the front and rear floor as well as the rear sill and patching the rear wheel wells and quarter panels.

IMG_3989.JPG


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Helipilot

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Try a copper paddle behind your welds to absorb some of the heat and prevent burn through. Good Luck!
 
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Yes, grinding is part of it. Also try cleaning up around the weld area better. Are you using gas or flux core?
 

davegonz

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MOTOV8R

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MOTOV8R

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Yes, grinding is part of it. Also try cleaning up around the weld area better. Are you using gas or flux core?

Gas. Good advice. I realized after I tacked those that I hadn't cleaned it up enough. I have been doing a better job with prep now.
 
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Yes, grinding is part of it. Also try cleaning up around the weld area better. Are you using gas or flux core?

Good advice right there. Wire wheel more of the paint off to create cleaner welds. Also, welding sheet metal with gas is a lot cleaner and easier than flux core. In the long run, you're better off grinding more than burning through.
 

40Wanted

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There will always be a good amount of grinding to be done to finish the patches. An aggressive sanding disc (36 grit) on a 4 1/2 inch grinder will knock welds down quick, just watch your surrounding metal.
From the pic you posted (looking at it on a phone, so could be wrong), it looks like the majority of your weld seams are butted tight together. I've found having a small gap between panels, around 1/8" or a little larger, really helps with getting flatter tack welds. It allows the weld to fill the gap between the 2 panels instead of riding on top of the panels.
 
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Start with the areas that are the least conspicuous, that way as you get better you can work to the areas that get seen the most. Do the easy ones first also, areas you can grind away at will if you mess up.
 
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Gas is good. I have heard and read that flux core is not for anything you will be painting later--something about the flux that interferes with the paint adhering--plus it is really messy
 

1Fine40

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Another trick is to drill holes and weld through the hole. Often with practice you end up with the weld being about flat when done. Or, what I did often when I was restoring my Bronco, get the body part secured in place with self tapping sheet metal screws, then remove a screw and weld through the hole. Looks like a spot weld. And the metal is cooling while you are removing the next screw. You don't want to build up too much heat for fear of warping the metal. Then once you have the part secured in place, use a tube of body sealant and run a bead to seal all the gaps. You can buy a caulking gun size tube of body sealer. If you do the sheet metal screw method, you will have some weld build up on the back side, but you don't see that side. Drilling a hole in one body part and welding through to the other part means no mound on the back side.

Use a weld through primer if overlapping metal so your welds work good.
 
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Looks like you are doing a great job on your floor by the way.

You want to see a basket case, take a look at these pics of my 73 Bronco restoration. Might give you some ideas. For the longest time my Bronco was held together with sheet metal screws, vise grips and ratchet straps. Everything was so rusty I had to keep moving things around until I could get the doors, hood, fenders and such into alignment. Was a nightmare. Finally got the body back together, only then could I remove it from the frame so I could restore the chassis. Anything can be brought back from the dead, just depends on how much work you are willing to do. Don't weld body parts until you are 100% certain of alignment. Use sheet metal screws.

Bronco Cowl Slideshow by gary__seven

Bronco Floor Slideshow by gary__seven

Bronco Quarter Panel Install Slideshow by gary__seven

1973 Early Ford Bronco Slideshow by gary__seven

1973 Bronco Paint Prep Slideshow by gary__seven

Bronco Painted Slideshow by gary__seven

1973 Bronco Completed Slideshow by gary__seven
 

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