Body Stripping ?'s (1 Viewer)

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Jul 19, 2004
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I am in the process of sanding/stripping/prepping my 60 for primer and paint. I have done a lot of initial sanding and stripping with a DA sander and a stripping attachment for my angle grinder. My questions are 1.) should I just continue to knock down the knicks and small rust with those two and feather the edges to uniform or 2.) just strip the whole damn truck down to bare metal? Which would be the best process and which would be the best base for primer and paint? Any other tips/advice is more than welcome.

Thanks
 

Gumby

Supamod
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Stock paint is an excellent base paint. It was applied under the best possible conditions. Unless you really want to know what's under the old paint I wouldn't strip it all down.
 
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The problem is, if you have a ton of knicks/dings you've sanded down to bare metal, it'll take another metric ton of work to bring the bare metal up where the "hole" can't be seen. If you can feel it, you'll be able to see it. Multiple coats of high build primer along with prodigious wet sanding with a block will be required to level the surface. Your choice...either way is a pain. Bare metal respray is going to give the best result overall, but may not be worth the effort depending on your end game for the truck.
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
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Location
Richmond, VA
 
 
 
Thanks for the reply's. My paint is so thin that it did not create a "hole." The stripping attachment I used is a fine wheel on the grinder, leaving a smooth transition between the paint and bare metal. I can not feel the transition with my eyes closed. I have absolutely NO clear coat left, resulting in a blue sponge everytime I washed the truck. The places that had a ton of knicks and rock chips I just stripped the whole thing to the bare metal.

I do not have spray capabilities so I will be applying primer with spray cans. I will then wet sand before taking it to be painted. This is just a weekend hauler and beach truck, so I am not expecting a show car job. Although, I do not want to see waves or high and low spots either.

Keep the tips coming. Thanks
 
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Use a high build primer even if you cannot feel the transition high-low points they are probably still there.
With the high build primer you can sand and even out any hi-low points for smoother finish.
Etching primer is for unpainted metals it etches a bond into the steel but does not have the same effect to paint, a good epoxy primer is all you need stick with spray gun automotive primers not rattle can.
Be sure you paint sooner than later primer does not sealout moisture and the longer you wait to paint the more chance of rust down the road,paint is what seals it up from moisture penetration.
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
579
Location
Richmond, VA
 
 
 
Use a high build primer even if you cannot feel the transition high-low points they are probably still there.
With the high build primer you can sand and even out any hi-low points for smoother finish.
Etching primer is for unpainted metals it etches a bond into the steel but does not have the same effect to paint, a good epoxy primer is all you need stick with spray gun automotive primers not rattle can.
Be sure you paint sooner than later primer does not sealout moisture and the longer you wait to paint the more chance of rust down the road,paint is what seals it up from moisture penetration.
What is the best primer to use if there are bare metal and painted areas? Epoxy primer covered by high build?

Thanks
 

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