Killing rust on body panels

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So I just bought a ‘77 FJ55 and I want to do what I can to stop further rust propagation until I have the time to do a full blown frame off. I'm leaning toward using Eastwood or Black Star or similar rust converter followed by some Cruiser Corps, rattle-can Freeborn Red and Cygnus White. Frame is in good shape so we’re only talking a few areas on the body.

I have read about 20 threads that mention rust converters but there was only a little experience with the Eastwood and almost nothing on the Black Star. Here is a pic so you can see what I’m working with.

Just looking for first hand experience with those products or similar in a similar application. Thanks

36060D1B-E68E-4612-957D-488AF1C7F36F.jpeg
 

Splangy

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They’re pretty much all the same. Phosphoric acid and a few additives. It doesn’t really matter which one you use. All they do is create a conversion coating that paint can stick to better than rust.
 
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After more research there are some differences and I think a water based converter is probably better as they will dry on non-rust areas so there are less issues with overlapping onto bare metal and/or existing paint. Looking at ordering a gallon of Corroseal. Again, not looking for perfection at this point. Probably just hit the spots with a wire brush or wheel, rust converter, and then some rattle can red or white.

Pig will be stored indoors. Hopefully that will help slow things down as well.
 
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Yes, soak everything that isn't painted, in oil, otherwise it'll corrode. You'll have to remove all that oil later, and sandblast/media blast out your original corrosion. Bolt off frame off at a later date, no shortcuts.

There's layup procedures from Caterpillar that you can find online for adding VCI oil to internal axles, engine, anything well sealed. This stinky VCI oil gas will prevent corrosion if sealed in for up to a few years.
 
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Thanks everyone. I will certainly do what I can to keep it from getting worse.

I continue to do research on how to ultimately address corrosion once I get around to the frame off. I've become very intrigued with the idea of chemical or otherwise stripping and applying an e-coating like new cars. Would be great to know that the frame and the body panels were coated inside and out prior to final painting.

Here's an example: Automotive Chemical Stripping and E-Coating - Select Motors
 
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Steel vehicle bodies from Volvo have been galvanized for years. I wouldn't hot-dip them at a metal shop though, like a fence post. It would warp. There is likely an automotive-grade process for that job.

There are a few shops in the US that will acid-dip a sand blasted, removed car body. I'm not sure how they neutralize that afterward though.

Go with the oil, you'll need lots of it. I keep uncontaminated used engine oil around for that purpose on small jobs. In central Canada there were several shops you could take your running vehicle to for an underbody oil spray.
 

jblueridge

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There are zinc rich powder coat primers now which might do the trick when restoring.
Eastwood has Rust Encapsulator which seals rust up, blocks oxygen and slows/stops the rot while the truck waits.
Personally, I would not use phosphoric or any acid converter unless I could rinse off excess.
POR15 cures rock hard so later sanding would be tough. Very expensive.
I have used PickleX 20 on bare metal (but not on seams) It stays unrusted for years if truck is kept dry.
Cavity wax from a spray can with a long nozzle will make a mess but get the job done.
 
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I used the Canadian DOM16 at half the cost of POR15. DOM16 would be my pick for inside panels, on areas not seen on the outside of the vehicle.

Yes, it would be very hard to take that POR epoxy paint off once it is on. In pipeline paints, we use a two-part epoxy paint to coat steel.

I'm hesitant to believe a soft rust paint or primer will properly isolate the steel from air, preventing further rust, as the POR and DOM do.
 
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I used Corroseal. It's water based, uses gallic acid and has a relatively high PH of 3+ compared to other acids that are 1-. I bought a gallon but probably used a pint, if that. I applied it using small disposable sponge paint brushes. I'm impressed. Once dry, whatever polymer they use is pretty hard. Not sure if I'll be able to buff out the mess that I made onto the surrounding paint (I'm a very sloppy painter) but at least I'm less concerned about propagation for the next 3 or 4 years.

Barely any odor at all during application and drips and spills clean up easily with a wet towel.

Here's a fairly good article on the product; lot's of information out there: Corroseal Rust Converter Review
 
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