powder coating

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A little off topic (not really but it's a long story): Can aluminum be powder coated?
Vic
 
Yes.
 
You know sears sells a powder spreyer for about $130. all you need is a used house oven to do small parts.
 
{You know sears sells a powder spreyer for about $130. all you need is a used house oven to do small parts.}




Ya...that should go over well with the wife

Can you please tell us her exact words when you try this........................
 
Big B. said:
You know sears sells a powder spreyer for about $130. all you need is a used house oven to do small parts.

Can't be a gas oven ... needs to be electric.
 
In2cruisers said:
{You know sears sells a powder spreyer for about $130. all you need is a used house oven to do small parts.}




Ya...that should go over well with the wife

Can you please tell us her exact words when you try this........................

If you notice I said "USED" oven. and gas would be fine
 
pappy said:
Can't be a gas oven ... needs to be electric.

You sure about that? I don't know about household ovens, but I run a propane-fired oven for my stuff. All the big ovens in industry are gas-fired too.
 
Off-Kilter said:
You sure about that? I don't know about household ovens, but I run a propane-fired oven for my stuff. All the big ovens in industry are gas-fired too.

It was my understanding that if the gas oven has a heat exchanger you are ok. If it's a household cooking oven the gas flame will ignite the volatiles coming off the powder as it cures.
 
Could I use my pottery kiln? Does the powder coat drip when you heat it? It should work. Just need to be real carful not to get glaze, or other stuff on the inside of the kiln. If you do it will short out the heating coils. Then my wife would be pissed.
 
Answer: yes, think of your mountain bike..... unless you are kicking my a** with all carbon fiber or titanium
 
kiln for powdercoating

albee said:
Could I use my pottery kiln? Does the powder coat drip when you heat it? It should work. Just need to be real carful not to get glaze, or other stuff on the inside of the kiln. If you do it will short out the heating coils. Then my wife would be pissed.

at wat temp do you need heat to for the powder coat.. dont think you'll have trouble with the coating dripping but i would be careful not to melt the part your trying to coat. :D i fire my kiln to 1300c and metal just burns off to leave a reddy brown stain...oops i just vapourized grill..he he
 
we used electric oven at about 375 degrees farenheit and take it out when you start to smell something funny
 
I'm going to use my kiln to powdercoat. Really anything can be used to do this as long as it gets up to 450 or what ever temp the powder requires and can stay there consistantly. My kiln has a digital controler, so I can just set it and go.
 
Gas oven will work fine. No worries about the "volitiles". My powder coater uses one just fine.
 
Different powders take different temps to cure. They range from 350 to 425 with a bake time of 12 to 20 minutes depending on the mass of the part and its composition. Coated parts do not drip anything. The powder is applied 1-3 mils thick. It flows out when heated to coat the part.

You do NOT want to use the kitchen oven for this! Not only will you fill the house with horrible fumes but the oven will retain the smell! I picked up an oven from my cousin who remodeled his kitchen and wired it into my basement next to a window. I open the window and garage door to get the fumes out. I use the powder kit from EastWood.

You can also cure large parts like axle housings with an infrared heat source. This is any kind of heater that puts out direct heat like a quartz heater. The part is placed close to the heater and when the powder flows on that section you wait 10-15 minutes then move the heater to the next section. It can take a while to flow a large object!
 

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